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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,410
    Z. :


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Ventura Highway in the Sunshine
    Posts
    21,202
    A lot of the article makes sense, but certainly isn't proven science, one way or the other.

    Common sense dictates to do what you evolved to do. Dark skinned people lived near the equator and can deal with massive doses of solar radiation. Far northerners evolved to get sun when they can. The problems arise when switching places. Dark skinned people living in the north don't get enough sunlight/Vit D/what ever, and northerners get too much if they go south, like XXXer's Montrealians in Antigua, a recipe for sunburn and hence skin cancer.

    I am of Mediterranean descent, and live in a Mediterranean climate. I have always got a lot of sun, still do. I tend to slowly tan starting in the spring and fade in the fall. I avoid sunburns. So far so good. Never had a BP problem (until this year). I assumed it was stress, (loss of the house in the fire, rebuilding, etc), but I am also not out in the sun nearly as much this last year (by a large amount,) due to living in an apartment, not cycling, etc. My first winter in vet school we had zero sun for months on end, and it really affected me. I definitely feel better with regular sunshine.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    17,493
    Once again "everything in moderation" seems to be the safest bet.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    501
    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    FYI, 1993 was 26 years ago. Virtually all sunscreens sold today are broad-spectrum UVA/UVB and have been for years.
    Yeah, part of my point is that the concerns noted in the (recent) article aren't new. The older article does mention the advent of the (then) new Parsol 1789, and that UVA blocking was moving forward, although other products on the market at the time claiming to block UVA blocked only about a third of the UVA spectrum. As a palefaced skier, I'm necessarily a sunscreen consumer, but given the history of dubious labeling claims, my default assumption is that "broad spectrum" claims are a mixed bag; hence, caveat emptor, try to buy the best, physical barriers where possible, etc etc. And the points made by both articles, that unscreened sunshine in moderation is *good* for you (which is the opposite of the advice that lots of people are dishing out) remain compelling.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    SLC
    Posts
    3,892
    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    FYI, 1993 was 26 years ago. Virtually all sunscreens sold today are broad-spectrum UVA/UVB and have been for years.

    Sunburn is bad. If you will be out long enough to get sunburned, put on sunscreen. If you won't, don't bother with it. This shit isn't rocket surgery.
    lol yeah

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