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  1. #1
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    Sep 2007
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    Carbon fork on fat bike?

    Anybody swap to a carbon fork on a fat bike? Any noticeable change to riding characteristics? Anybody know how much weight you can save? Found a good deal on one that will fit my bike and the weight savings would be nice. Not sure I would notice any vibration or handling changes with the big tires.

    Also, the fork is about 10mm longer but has an offset of 45 rather than 48 on the stock fork. I know the length will slacken things up a tiny bit, but what will the offset difference do?

    Seth

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Central VT
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    4,156
    Iíve debated swapping out my Bluto for a carbon fork. My fat bike is a pig and thats an easy 2+ lb weight loss. I had a Carver Popeye Carbon fork on a previous fat bike and it was nice to have such a light front end. Iíd say do it if youíre fat biking on mostly packed snowy trails.

    On the other hand the Bluto is nice if you use your fat bike on dirt.


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Fatbiking will always be slow, not sure it would be worth the investment to me. Also cheap carbon forks kinda scare me.
    a positive attitude will not solve all of your problems, but it may annoy enough people to make it worth the effort

    Formerly Rludes025

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    31
    Not a fat bike- but I put a carbon fork on an older aluminum hardtail (swapping out a Fox 32) and I really like it for smooth trails and fireroads. The front end is super lite now and really transformed the ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by sethschmautz View Post
    Anybody swap to a carbon fork on a fat bike? Any noticeable change to riding characteristics? Anybody know how much weight you can save? Found a good deal on one that will fit my bike and the weight savings would be nice. Not sure I would notice any vibration or handling changes with the big tires.

    Also, the fork is about 10mm longer but has an offset of 45 rather than 48 on the stock fork. I know the length will slacken things up a tiny bit, but what will the offset difference do?

    Seth

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  5. #5
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eluder View Post
    ...cheap carbon forks kinda scare me.
    Agreed. Not cheap, but a good deal/value.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2008
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    Iíll buy your bluto. Tired of my damn hands going numb.
    But Ellen kicks ass - if she had a beard it would be much more haggard. -Jer

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    264
    I sold the Bluto that came on used Farley back to the original carbon fork and defiantly dropped a good couple pounds. Don't think I'll miss it much but the fatty is pretty much been relegated to snow only. I thought the Bluto sucked though.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Canadian Rockies
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    1,080
    I ditched my boat anchor bluto in a trade for a carbon fork. Soooo much better for the type of riding I do. If I need suspension then winter is over. Once in a blue moon I miss the rock shox but the benefit of the carbon fork far outweighs my need for 2 extra pounds of squish. *that hardley ever worked in the cold*
    Bike is so much more manuverable when I need it to be. Highlights include being much easier to bring the bike back on the hardpack trail out of the soft stuff, way lighter for river and lake riding where suspension is overkill.
    One more time. * my first gen Bluto was allergic to the cold!!!!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Šguila
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    1,006
    Sold my Bluto, got china carbon fork. The 4.8" Buds are my suspension. Besides that, I think everyone else covered it. Bluto don't work in cold. I've got full suspension mtb for summer riding. Carbon is lighter, handles faster, dampening, all that.

  10. #10
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    Sep 2007
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    My fork arrives today. Looking forward to getting it swapped over this weekend.
    Last edited by sethschmautz; 01-05-2019 at 07:26 PM.

  11. #11
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    Sep 2007
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    Just got it installed. The very rudimentary scale I have showed 1.9# for the carbon fork and thru axle. The aluminum fork and thru axle was 3.1#. Looking forward to getting the first ride in this week. Thanks for the suggestions.

    SethClick image for larger version. 

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  12. #12
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    Sep 2007
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    Last update, I think. Got the first ride in today on a short little loop close to work. Front end was noticeably lighter and more nimble than with the aluminum fork. Bike seemed to handle much better all around.

    Seth

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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    crown of the continent
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    Nice. Inspiring me to go carbon and upgrade to tubeless next winter.


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    Something about the wrinkle in your forehead tells me there's a fit about to get thrown
    And I never hear a single word you say when you tell me not to have my fun
    It's the same old shit that I ain't gonna take off anyone.
    and I never had a shortage of people tryin' to warn me about the dangers I pose to myself.

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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
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    tip of the right hand stache
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    Iím on the bluto bandwagon.. I couldnít care less about the weight of my 5Ē tire fatty with frame bag and mechanical dropper. I canít speak to the offset change, but if you took away the bluto Iíd have to ride so defensively on the downs it wouldnít be fun anymore. FWIW Iím riding on single track that is typically pretty rocky/rooty and smoothes out a lot with the snow. You lose your front end on an ice patch in the middle of a turn and youíll be on the ground really fast. Or if the trail gets postholed by deer or some hikers the bluto is easily worth its weight.

    Obviously bluto forks would work better in warmer temps as with anything that relies on oil viscosity. Dropper posts and rear suspension Iíve seen blow up a few times though. Horses for courses I guess.

  15. #15
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    Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluenext View Post
    Iím on the bluto bandwagon.. I couldnít care less about the weight of my 5Ē tire fatty with frame bag and mechanical dropper. I canít speak to the offset change, but if you took away the bluto Iíd have to ride so defensively on the downs it wouldnít be fun anymore. FWIW Iím riding on single track that is typically pretty rocky/rooty and smoothes out a lot with the snow. You lose your front end on an ice patch in the middle of a turn and youíll be on the ground really fast. Or if the trail gets postholed by deer or some hikers the bluto is easily worth its weight.

    Obviously bluto forks would work better in warmer temps as with anything that relies on oil viscosity. Dropper posts and rear suspension Iíve seen blow up a few times though. Horses for courses I guess.
    Bumping this thread as I was looking for info on how cold is too cold for my shimano mineral oil hydraulic brakes... and this comment makes me wonder if it's too cold for a bluto to play nice, maybe my brakes don't work anymore anyway?

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  16. #16
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    Sep 2007
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    I'm still of the opinion that carbon was the right choice for me. I've been really thankful for how simple the rigid bike is. It can get a little rowdy if it gets really bumpy, but snow tends to smooth that out a bit and I'm only riding this bike on trails in the summer with small kids, so not needing much in the way of suspension at those slow speeds.

    If this was a one bike quiver, I would think that a suspension fork would be really nice. I've been thinking that if I end up adding suspension it might be a lauf. I think those work pretty well in the cold.

    Seth

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shorty_J View Post
    Bumping this thread as I was looking for info on how cold is too cold for my shimano mineral oil hydraulic brakes... and this comment makes me wonder if it's too cold for a bluto to play nice, maybe my brakes don't work anymore anyway?

    Sent from my SM-A505W using Tapatalk
    My shimano brakes worked fine at -15f last week.
    But Ellen kicks ass - if she had a beard it would be much more haggard. -Jer

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chugachjed View Post
    My shimano brakes worked fine at -15f last week.
    Right on... thanks.

    I was debating riding to the pub yesterday when it was the same temp but didn't want to have no brakes coming home and have to walk so I bailed on the idea.

    I'll give it a try next time

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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    120
    You can usually find a Specialized Fatboy carbon fork on eBay for a reasonable price; and they are solid. Lot's of those bikes around and many folks put Bluto's on them.

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