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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by altacoup View Post
    You certainly don't. But I spent a long soul crushing time probing for a girl who was died at snowbird in bounds after extensive control work. And while I'm sure some people skied some steep stuff in the backcountry that day. It taught me that even the most controlled slopes, being controlled by the best patrollers can be dangerous. In the end for me I have one simple rule. I never fuck with persistent weak layers and deep slabs. And every time I mention it to a professional avie person or avid BC skier I get the same awnser. You'll live to ski more that way. In the past I was more likely to take risks. But my philosophy has changed to have more fun for me time . Still down to send big lines and big air but have the patience to wait for things to line up. For me, I ski in the BC when my worries are only about newly deposited snow or changing temps. Simple as that. I don't judge those who have a higher danger threshold not should they judge those whose threshold is lesser. In the end is all about having fun and coming home safe. Terrain selection is your friend and good partners are to. It's a big picture process and each group must paint their own picture. Over hyped or not. I've yet to ever read a forecast that was just plain wrong anywhere. There's anyways good info whether you like the format or forecaster or you hate them. They might bring another color to your picture that wasn't in your palate and that alone is worthy. Stay safe or there. All data helps the WISE, only the fool rejects based upon impulse.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Despite the grammar, this is a great POV.

  2. #152
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    They might bring another color to your picture that wasn't in your palate and that alone is worthy. Stay safe or there. All data helps the WISE, only the fool rejects based upon impulse.
    embrace the gape
    and believe

  3. #153
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    Aug 2007
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    5,378
    Quote Originally Posted by altacoup View Post
    You certainly don't. But I spent a long soul crushing time probing for a girl who was died at snowbird in bounds after extensive control work. And while I'm sure some people skied some steep stuff in the backcountry that day.
    Sorry man, I was there too. We found one of her skis in the lower ampitheater and got people to start probing below it before ski patrol came and took over. it was a tough search.

    I like your philosophy though on when to go out. If it's a super tricky day, it's so easy to just hold back rather than try to put a million puzzle pieces together to see if you are going to ski or die.

  4. #154
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    Nov 2002
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    5,998
    This thread prompted me to actually look at some social media. Here is the CAICs Insta

    https://www.instagram.com/coavalancheinfo/

    If you got any to share (good or bad), lets post them up here.

  5. #155
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    Jan 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    This thread prompted me to actually look at some social media. Here is the CAICs Insta

    https://www.instagram.com/coavalancheinfo/

    If you got any to share (good or bad), lets post them up here.
    That strikes me as a 100% reasonable and informative post given the accident at hand.

  6. #156
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    Dec 2003
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    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXK...UUgjzFQ/videos

    The Northwest Snow and Avalanche Workshop presentations posted on youtube by NWAC
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  7. #157
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    Apr 2016
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    566
    Quote Originally Posted by doebedoe View Post
    That strikes me as a 100% reasonable and informative post given the accident at hand.
    Same. And I don't know anything about the skiers involved in the avalanche, but it seems like social media didn't overhype anything as far as they were concerned. They still found themselves on the type of slope likely to slide.

  8. #158
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    Jan 2008
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    truckee
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    I hiked part of the Muir trail one June in the Evolution/Palisades area. Spent a lot of time crawling over 3 ft + diameter knocked-down trees piled 3 and 4 trees high. The slope opposite Dusy Basin on the other side of the Middle Fork of the Kings was 2000 vertical feet and several hundred yards wide of similar sized knocked down trees--with not a single tree left standing.

  9. #159
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    Jan 2006
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    I remember this one time I shared an anecdote that had nothing to do with the thread title, or so I thought.

    But in reality, it was way more than just once.
    Move upside and let the man go through...

  10. #160
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    Apr 2016
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    Cool story Hansel.

  11. #161
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    Feb 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cravenmorhead View Post
    Cool story Hansel.
    So hot right now

  12. #162
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    Dec 2008
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    315
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunder View Post
    If you are going to make decisions about skiing a slope based upon slope angle, you are going to end up dead. A major problem with all avy classes is way too much time is wasted on book statistics and not real time in the mountains actually evaluating terrain and conditions. Never once in 20 years have I ever seen anyone decide to ski a slope because its only 35 degrees, and not the "book target range" At the end of the day its either steep enough to slide or its not. I dont know of a single avalanche professional that can give you an exact number on any given day based upon conditions.
    I agree with your sentiments, and this is also how I approach ski touring / hazard assessment / and decision making. But i think it bears mentioning that in Europe a large part of the decision making is through the Munter reduction method which (this came as a BIG surprise to me) is much more quantitative and empirical than the typical N. American approach.

    Sorry if this got covered elsewhere. Haven't read the whole thread yet.

  13. #163
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    Name:  Capture.JPG
Views: 598
Size:  48.7 KB

    From NWAC: Northway, Crystal (Closed, in bounds)
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  14. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    I remember this one time I shared an anecdote that had nothing to do with the thread title, or so I thought.

    But in reality, it was way more than just once.
    I was talking about the idea, posted on the previous page, that you're safe in the trees. I guess I should have made that more explicit; I thought it was pretty obvious, but maybe you only read the last page of the thread.

  15. #165
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    Jan 2010
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    Does anyone else use the BCA app w/ slope angle tool? Hopefully its accurate?!

  16. #166
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    Aug 2006
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    the big dirty
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    Not sure what is worse. People who say "stability was excellent" or people who quiz you about pit results, aspect or elevation when you post simple observations. As if the snowpack or human factors give a shit if you have that knowledge...

  17. #167
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    Nov 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiitsbetter View Post
    People who say "stability was excellent"
    Always find this a bit odd tbh

  18. #168
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    Nov 2002
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    Awesome thread. How that I think about it, I'm a big fan for using social media to attempt to hit as many eyeballs with as much information as possible if the goal is to assist in making good decisions. I think the recently posted pictures do this.

    Where I think it becomes counter productive is when the information is not objects an tries to effect the readers emotions. i.e. scare them. This seems to lead to a bit of a fuck you response.

  19. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiitsbetter View Post
    Not sure what is worse. People who say "stability was excellent" or people who quiz you about pit results, aspect or elevation when you post simple observations. As if the snowpack or human factors give a shit if you have that knowledge...
    We have a winner

  20. #170
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    Oct 2003
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    The Ranch
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiitsbetter View Post
    Not sure what is worse. People who say "stability was excellent" or people who quiz you about pit results, aspect or elevation when you post simple observations. As if the snowpack or human factors give a shit if you have that knowledge...
    Maybe they're both the worst.

  21. #171
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    Dec 2007
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    Hell Track
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    #stabilitywasnotfatal

  22. #172
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    Feb 2006
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    Montrose, CO
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    Back to the idea of social media hyping snowpack conditions...

    What they're reporting is information based on objective snow analysis for a particular area. Are those guys the definitive experts? Hard to say. Some of them are pretty well trained and know how to pick apart snowpack profile. Are they out skiing everyday on different aspects?-hard to say-some are, some aren't.

    I think the thing to keep in mind is that its information and to use it as one of many tools for planning your day. The majority of my backcountry skiing experience has been in places where the snowpack is notoriously bad: throughout Colorado and the Sangre de Cristos around Taos ski valley. Consequently, my background causes me to be perhaps more cautious than say, a person from an area with more of a maritime snowpack or consistent snowfall.

    As noted earlier in this post, the ability to read the terrain is probably the most important skill to have in the avalanche avoidance game. Aspects, pitch, micro-terrain, traps, convex roll-overs, escape plans...these are "real time" tools you can use on any day in the backcountry-whether its a high danger day or low.

    The rating scale is just part of it. I've had great touring days on high danger days-choosing to ski areas that are relatively safe and avoiding the areas that would've obliterated us. I've had scary days on "low danger" days too-thinking that its OK to push it because the rating was a "low moderate or even low".

  23. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  24. #174
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    Nov 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWbrit View Post
    That was frightening. Wow.

  25. #175
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    Jan 2010
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    Does social media overhype avy danger?

    Quote Originally Posted by PNWbrit View Post
    18 on ball bearings

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