Page 5 of 16 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 125 of 380
  1. #101
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    1,416
    people are going deep into wheel and even car quivers. TGR forumz bringing it

    Don't forget the TPMS sensor change fee. Actually spent money on a tool on the internets so I could re-program my yota's TPMS sensors every time I change my wheels out.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    15,748
    Quote Originally Posted by klauss View Post
    Don't forget the TPMS sensor change fee. Actually spent money on a tool on the internets so I could re-program my yota's TPMS sensors every time I change my wheels out.
    Ignoring the TPMS warning light = free.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    4,528
    Yep... sensors from my rig are long gone. The light will burn out eventually.
    PE, Mechanical Engineering
    University of Bridger Bowl Alumnus
    Alpental Creeper

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    1,175
    Quote Originally Posted by klauss View Post
    people are going deep into wheel and even car quivers. TGR forumz bringing it

    Don't forget the TPMS sensor change fee. Actually spent money on a tool on the internets so I could re-program my yota's TPMS sensors every time I change my wheels out.
    What Toyota? Our Highlander (2017) remembers both sets. Discount tire programmed the new sensors when we bought snows and it remains happy when I switch them out. Until it gets 3 degrees warmer or colder and the pressure changes by .000005psi and the stupid light comes back on anyway.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    P-tex, CA
    Posts
    8,196
    Yup, forgot about the sensors...add those to the list. Those things saved me in Telluride this past Summer. I was searching for some late July snow (on more of a dirt road than a 4X4) and found nothing so I got greedy in the SUV. Took a more aggressive road high into a cirque-like basin. Tagged a sharp rock and punctured the sidewall. The TPMS alarm started going off and I fucking gunned it back about a 1/4 mile back to the main dirt road watching the pressure go from 40 to 0. Without them, I'd have to walk to get cell reception etc.

    Another point for mountain drives on your SUV...the security bolts on your rims. I suggest you remove them. From the above experience, I was like 'no brainer, I'll just put on the donut and order a new tire.' However, the security bolt requires 'a key attachment' with grooves that aren't too deep. So doing it by hand with a wrench is impossible. I had a guy help me with one of us holding the wrench in place while the other tried to turn and nothing worked. I had to call a tow truck so he could take 2 seconds and use an impact wrench and the bolt came right off. So I guess you could keep a charged impact wrench in your car or remove the bolt. If I was in the middle of nowhere, I'd be screwed. With normal bolts, I'd be fine.

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by skier666 View Post
    Yup, forgot about the sensors...add those to the list. Those things saved me in Telluride this past Summer. I was searching for some late July snow (on more of a dirt road than a 4X4) and found nothing so I got greedy in the SUV. Took a more aggressive road high into a cirque-like basin. Tagged a sharp rock and punctured the sidewall. The TPMS alarm started going off and I fucking gunned it back about a 1/4 mile back to the main dirt road watching the pressure go from 40 to 0. Without them, I'd have to walk to get cell reception etc.

    Another point for mountain drives on your SUV...the security bolts on your rims. I suggest you remove them. From the above experience, I was like 'no brainer, I'll just put on the donut and order a new tire.' However, the security bolt requires 'a key attachment' with grooves that aren't too deep. So doing it by hand with a wrench is impossible. I had a guy help me with one of us holding the wrench in place while the other tried to turn and nothing worked. I had to call a tow truck so he could take 2 seconds and use an impact wrench and the bolt came right off. So I guess you could keep a charged impact wrench in your car or remove the bolt. If I was in the middle of nowhere, I'd be screwed. With normal bolts, I'd be fine.
    If it makes sense, you can always try carrying a breaker bar as well to help in loosening the lug off without an impact wrench.

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    OR
    Posts
    1,416
    Quote Originally Posted by GPP33 View Post
    What Toyota? Our Highlander (2017) remembers both sets. Discount tire programmed the new sensors when we bought snows and it remains happy when I switch them out. Until it gets 3 degrees warmer or colder and the pressure changes by .000005psi and the stupid light comes back on anyway.
    I have a 2013 sequoia and it only stores 5 codes at a time. I just dealt with the warning the first winter then just decided to buy the tool (ATAQ Quickset) for $40 used and give me the ability to do it myself since the winter wheels were OEM takeoffs from craigslist and actually had the sensors already included - I figured I would utilize them and including the tool may help with re-sell on the wheelset at some point but maybe not.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    4,528
    Quote Originally Posted by skier666 View Post
    Yup, forgot about the sensors...add those to the list. Those things saved me in Telluride this past Summer. I was searching for some late July snow (on more of a dirt road than a 4X4) and found nothing so I got greedy in the SUV. Took a more aggressive road high into a cirque-like basin. Tagged a sharp rock and punctured the sidewall. The TPMS alarm started going off and I fucking gunned it back about a 1/4 mile back to the main dirt road watching the pressure go from 40 to 0. Without them, I'd have to walk to get cell reception etc.
    .
    Or, like, change to the spare?
    PE, Mechanical Engineering
    University of Bridger Bowl Alumnus
    Alpental Creeper

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Wet and Mild
    Posts
    4,650
    Get 18 inch wheels to put snows on for your F150. Large wheels and low profile tires on a truck scream "I'm a vain douchebag" louder than having 4 lightbars.

    The only thing funnier than low-pro snow tires are low-pro mud tires.
    Set my compass North, I got Winter in my blood.

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    P-tex, CA
    Posts
    8,196
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Or, like, change to the spare?
    It basically allowed me to get to a better zone to change to the spare. Which ended up for the best because the tow truck could not have made it to where I punctured the tire.

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Den/Baltimore
    Posts
    5,129
    Quote Originally Posted by Havn View Post
    If it makes sense, you can always try carrying a breaker bar as well to help in loosening the lug off without an impact wrench.
    Yeah, I carry a breaker bar and a torque wrench. But I'm a nerd.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    1,505
    Just read the o.p. post, nothin' else.

    A Corrola ain't gonna get far in northwest british columbia big dump coastal snowfall zones. Even with winter tires and awd, yer gonna get high centered when the plows can't keep up with snowfall on major routes and more likely sideroads...or get stuck on windrows in the middle/sides of roads during storms. Need the clearance of an s.u.v. Extra bonus of a bigger truck is impact protection from moose which is a big hazard in these parts. Small cars get crushed...with a bigger truck at least you have a chance of it just landing on the hood.
    Master of mediocrity.

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    4,936
    Quote Originally Posted by swissiphic View Post
    Just read the o.p. post, nothin' else.

    A Corrola ain't gonna get far in northwest british columbia big dump coastal snowfall zones. Even with winter tires and awd, yer gonna get high centered when the plows can't keep up with snowfall on major routes and more likely sideroads...or get stuck on windrows in the middle/sides of roads during storms. Need the clearance of an s.u.v. Extra bonus of a bigger truck is impact protection from moose which is a big hazard in these parts. Small cars get crushed...with a bigger truck at least you have a chance of it just landing on the hood.
    100%
    And sizing up on your winter tires a couple of inches gives a bit more clearance.
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    the situation strikes me as WAY too much drama at this point

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    17,959
    out on the main highway which up here isn't very main when the plow can't keep up nobody is going anywhere
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    203
    Quote Originally Posted by swissiphic View Post
    Just read the o.p. post, nothin' else.

    A Corrola ain't gonna get far in northwest british columbia big dump coastal snowfall zones. Even with winter tires and awd, yer gonna get high centered when the plows can't keep up with snowfall on major routes and more likely sideroads...or get stuck on windrows in the middle/sides of roads during storms. Need the clearance of an s.u.v. Extra bonus of a bigger truck is impact protection from moose which is a big hazard in these parts. Small cars get crushed...with a bigger truck at least you have a chance of it just landing on the hood.
    Moose are no joke. Survived this a little over 3 years ago.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	11888650_1040291955990735_3007141830591935593_o.jpg 
Views:	127 
Size:	139.0 KB 
ID:	257526

  16. #116
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    4,844
    Quote Originally Posted by KyleLanTheman View Post
    Moose are no joke. Survived this a little over 3 years ago.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	11888650_1040291955990735_3007141830591935593_o.jpg 
Views:	127 
Size:	139.0 KB 
ID:	257526
    That should buff right out.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    10,807
    Let's also remember that it doesn't matter how good your tires are or whether you have 4WD or AWD if your wiper blades suck.

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    9,300ft
    Posts
    17,692
    RIMS: Most SUVs and trucks are fine with 16/17 or maybe 18" wheels. 18/19/20/21 are bling. Check! There are also usually a lot of cheap wheels on ebay and craigslist because people with too much money take off their factory 17/18s to buy bling 21s. Just make sure the bolt pattern is compatible (eg a 4runner/tacoma/tundra/FJ is going to be a 6x5.5 (6x139) and you want a 6.5-7.5" while a Subaru is probably a 5x100 unless you have a Tribeca).

    CHANGE YOUR OWN: If you have your own extra set of rims, you can get a floor jack and an electric impact wrench from harbor freight for $50 each which means you can change your tires with minimal effort in a half hour, no making appointments with the tire shop or loading/unloading tires in your car.

    DOWNSIZE: If your vehicle has high stock clearance like a 4Runner, or you have a lifted truck, or you don't get massive storms + drive on unplowed roads, downsizing your tire will decrease your cost, increase your actual fuel economy, and lower your center of gravity.

    UPSIZE If your vehicle has low stock clearance like a sedan, or your live somewhere with huge storms or you drive on unplowed, then upsizing your tire will increase your clearance, but check your vehicles forum to see how much you can do without rubbing.

    Again, narrowing your section width on your tire is a HUGE performance boost! eg stock 265 to 255 or 245, stock 225 to 215!

    TPMS if you vehicle gives you live readout of individual wheels in PSI, them maybe thats worth all the $, but otherwise you have one light that only comes on when they are >25% under inflated! That's far past the point where you lose performance, mileage, and experience accelerated and uneven treadwear!!! Be disciplined, buy a digital meter off ebay or amazon for $10, check once a week cold (to optimize pressures) and when you gas (for safety) and you'll get better mileage, performance, and treadlife.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  19. #119
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    403
    wow this thread is a shitshow. my 98 4runner, 4x4 not AWD, with Blizzaks is basically unstoppable in snow. I pull subies out of ditches at backcountry trailheads regularly. not to mention the boneheads that thought it was a good idea to try to drive their FWD economy car with all seasons up a snow covered dirt road (cough, Butler Gulch, cough), also the ones most likely to not say thank you and/or have a bad attitude about me trying to help them.

    otoh, I did Iceland for 3 months in winter in a Yaris with studded tires with no issues. but then, I was sticking to paved roads. I'm on the verge of swapping my T4R for a FWD with studs, just to save on gas. My gas costs right now going out to the mountains 3-4x a week is ridiculous.

  20. #120
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    17,959
    yeah but I had one of them 4-runers ^^ they were pretty good dicking around at low speed but scary at highway speed

    I was spending big coin doing a lot of highway miles so I traded it for a TDi golf, I ended up spending more for the car payment but saving on the gas/repair bills so it cost exactly the same per month to drive a new car instead of a 10 yr old SUV and the car was way less stressful to drive at hyway speed

    where it was all about stability/handling when the shit goes down
    Last edited by XXX-er; 11-27-2018 at 08:24 PM.
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  21. #121
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    4,528
    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    . Just make sure the bolt pattern is compatible (eg a 4runner/tacoma/tundra/FJ is going to be a 6x5.5 (6x139) and you want a 6.5-7.5" while a Subaru is probably a 5x100 unless you have a Tribeca).
    Couple nitpicks in an otherwise solid post...

    07+ Tundra and Sequoia break from old Yota convention and use 5 x 150mm.

    Subaru oddities include the STi at 5 x 114mm (except 2004).
    PE, Mechanical Engineering
    University of Bridger Bowl Alumnus
    Alpental Creeper

  22. #122
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    9,300ft
    Posts
    17,692
    ^good stuff!
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  23. #123
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,329
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    Couple nitpicks in an otherwise solid post...

    07+ Tundra and Sequoia break from old Yota convention and use 5 x 150mm.

    Subaru oddities include the STi at 5 x 114mm (except 2004).
    Legacy, outback, and wrx after 2015 are 5x114 too now. Forester, base impreza, crosstrek still 5x100.

  24. #124
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    1,175
    Quote Originally Posted by skier666 View Post
    Another point for mountain drives on your SUV...the security bolts on your rims.
    Thanks for the reminder. Forgot to put that damn thing in the car after I switched over to the snows.

  25. #125
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    403
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    yeah but I had one of them 4-runers ^^ they were pretty good dicking around at low speed but scary at highway speed

    I was spending big coin doing a lot of highway miles so I traded it for a TDi golf, I ended up spending more for the car payment but saving on the gas/repair bills so it cost exactly the same per month to drive a new car instead of a 10 yr old SUV and the car was way less stressful to drive at hyway speed

    where it was all about stability/handling when the shit goes down
    yeah, basically that. I spent a lot of time offroading this summer in UT and CO, it was great for that but now that I'm driving about 2 hours a day on 70, I'd much rather have something lower, better handling at highway speeds, and better mpg.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •