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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    231

    Capable road bike with a more upright position

    I'm looking at getting more heavily into road riding and am a little lost in the sea of bikes. I don't need anything special, just capable for general road and perhaps a little gravel on the side. My biggest caveat is that I have a messed up SI joint (the connective tissue between your lower back and hip) and have trouble in the forward riding position traditional to road bikes. The very upright position of my mountain bike is relatively safe, but obviously too upright for road.

    I was initially thinking of trying to find something with flat bars on road-ish geometry, but I'm worried those bikes (usually in brands' "urban" or "comfort" categories) aren't really built for long, hilly rides in the Santa Cruz mountains. Is something like a modern Cross bike, perhaps with a shorter than normal stem, more what I should be looking for? I appreciate any help and advice.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    98
    Have you looked at a Specialized Roubaix?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Magically whisked away to...Delaware
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    1,848
    I'd look at the Canyon Endurace.

    https://www.canyon.com/en-us/road/endurace/cf-slx/

    https://www.canyon.com/en-us/road/endurace/cf-sl/

    Nearly every company has their "endurance" bike. Honestly, it's what most of us should probably be riding anyways. Until recently though, the endurance models were a "lesser" version of their flagship bikes. But they've stepped it up recently and the endurance bikes are largely on par.

    My whole point is: everyone has one and most are good. Generally, head tube is a little longer for a more upright position. The wheelbase is a little longer and HTA a little slacker for a more stable ride.

    EDIT to add: make sure it's a "gravel" bike with discs that can fit a 30 tire...b/c, otherwise you're not cool and your bike will explode.
    Last edited by smartyiak; 10-29-2018 at 09:53 AM.
    It makes perfect sense...until you think about it.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whistler
    Posts
    1,438
    "Endurance Geometry" road bikes have a taller head tube. Then add fork steerer spacers and positive rise stem. You can easily get your bars as high as your seat level.
    There is a ton of adjustment that can be done. The key is starting with a frame with a tall head tube.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    13,236
    This aint rocket science:
    1. Stick with drop bars.
    2. Get a stem with lots of rise, e.g., Ritchey 30* or Bontrager 35*. Stack steerer shims to tweak height.
    3. Get a shallow drop bar
    4. Mount brake levers at top of apex of drop curve

    OR

    Get a custom frame. I do both

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Missoula
    Posts
    1,197
    Depends how much off pavement riding you want to do. I do a pretty good amount of it on skinny tires. 28-32 is passable on most surfaces, but if you're spending a lot of time on gravel, especially loose gravel, 38-40mm tires are a lot nicer and give you more grip, stability, and comfort. How much tire fits is kind of the big difference between an "endurance" road and a "gravel" bike. So if you want to spend more time on dirt and gravel roads get something like a kona rove or cannondale topstone or whatever instead of like, a specialized roubaix or cannondale synapse.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    623

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
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    13,236
    I like much of what Rivendell does, but what the fuck with the threaded steerers and quill stems?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Summit North
    Posts
    5,328

    Capable road bike with a more upright position

    Quote Originally Posted by GeezerSteve View Post
    I like much of what Rivendell does, but what the fuck with the threaded steerers and quill stems?
    It fits Grants luddite brand position?
    Alpental Indigenous

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    5,984
    Ha, yup.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    635
    Check out the Specialized Diverge. I test rode it and felt it was too upright for me - much more so than a Roubaix, but is still very much a road bike.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    231
    Thanks for the recommendations. The Canyons are really enticing. I'm going to take a gander at them when I'm down by their showroom in Carlsbad in a few weeks.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Land of Brine Shrimp and Magic Underwear
    Posts
    5,812
    I got on a Giant Defy last year. Got a shorter stem and flipped it on stacked spacers. Very comfy, and fast feeling bike. This year's fits some bigger tires too.
    There's nothing better than sliding down snow... flying through the air.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Down In A Hole, Up in the Sky
    Posts
    24,020
    I got an '18 Defy that will fit 30mm tires. The '19 fits 32mm...but I wish mine fit 38mm.
    Oh well.
    StokePimpin' ain't easy

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Eburg
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    Quote Originally Posted by ACH View Post
    It fits Grants luddite brand position?
    yeah, that's likely it

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,941
    So many ways to get to the OP's goal. Personally, I'd go Synapse disc. Play with risers, stems, etc until I got it dialed.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Gaperville, CO
    Posts
    2,951
    Quote Originally Posted by GeezerSteve View Post
    I like much of what Rivendell does, but what the fuck with the threaded steerers and quill stems?
    If you're paying the premium for a Riv you're sold on the whole stick. Stems and threadless look prettier I agree. But they are a PITA to work on, adjust, replace, and lack stiffness of a threadless 1 1/8th steer.

    Which is why you admire Grants bikes, then go buy a VO.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    13,236
    Quote Originally Posted by doebedoe View Post
    Which is [if] why you admire Grants bikes, then go buy a VO.
    Nah. I'll keeping building my own frames.

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