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  1. #1
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    What ropes are people climbing on these days?

    I have a nearly new 10.5 x 60 sport rope that’s too heavy to bring anywhere.

    What is the lightest single rope these days? For Teton rock routes I’d like something new and snazzy- a 60m dry rope.

    Are alpine climbers on sub 9mm ropes?

    What belay devices work the best for these thinner single roles? Anything newer than a std. ATC?
    Ski Shop



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  2. #2
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    May 2004
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    In with the 9.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2010
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    The 8th best place in the LBP
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    All three ropes did slip in a GriGri 2 when they were new and slick, but once their initial sheen wore off, they all caught and held without issue.
    Well that's reassuring lol.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiing-in-jackson View Post
    What belay devices work the best for these thinner single roles? Anything newer than a std. ATC?
    If you don't need to top-belay or rappel, maybe look at the Mammut Smart? I think it's rated for 8.6mm where the GriGri2 is rated for 8.9mm. The alpine version can also be used for rappelling and is available for use with ropes as thin as 7.5mm (there are two versions).

  5. #5
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    ATC is all you will ever need. KISS

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    259
    Quote Originally Posted by skiing-in-jackson View Post
    I have a nearly new 10.5 x 60 sport rope that’s too heavy to bring anywhere.

    What is the lightest single rope these days? For Teton rock routes I’d like something new and snazzy- a 60m dry rope.

    Are alpine climbers on sub 9mm ropes?

    What belay devices work the best for these thinner single roles? Anything newer than a std. ATC?
    We use a Beal Stinger Pro (9.4mm) as our main cragging rope and love it. Typically climb with 1 Beal Ice Line (8.1, 1/2) on easy to moderate alpine routes and will double them up if we expect difficulties. GriGri 2 works great with the Stinger, Reverso for the iceline or when multipitching with the Stinger.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2007
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    Wow, 8.5mm 50g/m single rope. Technology marches on. I remember when 11mm 65g/m was the skinniest/lightest single rope.

    FWIW, we have preferred the ATC XP over the classic ATC for skinnier ropes. IME the groove/teeth thingies provide a bit more braking power with skinnies. I dunno what else is out there. (My technical climbing days are behind me.)

    Quote Originally Posted by skiing-in-jackson View Post
    Are alpine climbers on sub 9mm ropes?
    Sure, for years. 25 years ago it wasn't uncommon to use a double rope for some alpine routes with low fall factors. Now it's possible to go sub-9mm with single rating, which is nice.

  8. #8
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    Jan 2006
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    Jackson Hole
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    Also from Rock and Ice.

    I had a great set of twin 9s back in the early 90s. It was very convenient. Lots of Teton- pretty much everything on the Grand- require a rappel. Not having a big rope has great appeal. Many times I climbed easier terrain with just a single 9.

    The above article refers to slickness and potential belay/rappel issues due to treated sheaths & smaller diameters.

    I’m hoping to get out a lot in September and Oct. Hoping to bring a daughter up the Grand & other stuff. New ropes are in order. For the Upper Exum, I know the perfect rack. There’s really only a few moves that need pro. I know a guy who regularly climbed ( he’s old now) who insisted you only needed a half dozen #4 nuts to climb the Grand. Still he always brought two ropes, he never downclimbed the OS.
    Ski Shop



    Do not tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don't tell them where they know the fish.

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    9,296

    What ropes are people climbing on these days?

    There are tons of new options for belay devices. If you want to only crag I'd look at the ATC pilot or a similar design (the smart was mentioned, but there are many similar) over a standard ATC.

    as for ropes, it seems like the standard crag cord has drifted down to the 9.6 territory, and they’ve gotten less expensive at the same time.
    .....I hope you know that this will go down on your permanent record

    http://procatinator.com/?cat=80

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    Lower Mainland
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    Note that most super-skinny ropes get that way by using really thin sheaths, which means decreased durability. I would suggest ignoring the advertised diameter, and focus on a rope that maximizes sheath percentage (most manufacturers list it somewhere) while minimizing weight (g/m is pretty easy to compare across ropes).

    Also, be aware that ATC-style devices list a larger range of usable diameters than is actually possible with a single rope. For example, Black Diamond says that the ATC-Guide can handle ropes from 7.7mm to 11mm, but if you actually look at the instructions (instead of the marketing) this is what it says:
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    You can use sub-9mm single ropes on an ATC-style device, but you have to find ways to mitigate the lack of friction (wear gloves, use two carabiners, etc).

    And also don't get carried away by lightweight when it comes to ropes. 50g/m sounds a lot better than 53g/m, but on a 60m rope that only translates to 6 extra oz of weight. Just take a dump at the trailhead instead and use that extra $20 for beers when you get back down.

  11. #11
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    Jun 2006
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    There are plenty of sub 9mm ropes out there these days. Used mostly for redpoints or as in your case as light weight alpine lines. The new Grigri + works well to 8.5mm, but I think it's rated for 8.9mm ropes. Nearly all sub 9mm ropes recommend they be used with an experienced belayer. Like most things in climb, experience is the key. If you are climbing with people who you know and trust, going sub 9mm is reasonable, but if you climb with relatively new climbers, I would keep the rope in the mid 9mm range. Plenty light, but has the extra margin of safety. Just take a few less beers in your climbing pack to balance the extra rope length.

    edit to add: I just bought a new rope, a Blue Ice 9.6, nice middle of the road, do everything kind of rope. Not super sexy dental floss, but good all around rope. Light enough for alpine use, tough enough for cragging, dry treated for ice, et. al. I don't climb enough to justify a climbing rope quiver.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  12. #12
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    Sep 2008
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    It's true that the difference between 10.5 and 9.4 isn't crazy on a 60m and that nice fat sheath can be nice on some TR's.
    .....I hope you know that this will go down on your permanent record

    http://procatinator.com/?cat=80

  13. #13
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    May 2011
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    Alex and Tommy did their el cap speed runs with Tommy's pro model rope. It's an Edelrid 9.6mm with extra beefy sheath.

  14. #14
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    Oct 2003
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    Ogden
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    I was following up a chossy chimney in the Tetons when rockfall severed the rope about 15 feet above me (I ducked back into a hole). It was an 8.7 mm mammut serenity. I have no idea if a beefier rope would've been ok or not.

    Just FYI, a 70m rope makes both rappel stations off of the Grand doable on a single (throw south((if memory serves, double check this)). Lots of stuff in the Winds is suited to a 70m these days as well.

    edit: the OP probably knows way more about rappelling the Grand then me so disregard.

  15. #15
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    Sep 2008
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    https://www.jhnewsandguide.com/news/...a9f7694de.html

    this article says 2 60s are customary. and rip, climber
    .....I hope you know that this will go down on your permanent record

    http://procatinator.com/?cat=80

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ml242 View Post
    https://www.jhnewsandguide.com/news/...a9f7694de.html

    this article says 2 60s are customary. and rip, climber
    Different climb. Guides wall is a five pitch route in Cascade Canyon. And yeah, 60 and a tag line is the way to go for it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    I was following up a chossy chimney in the Tetons when rockfall severed the rope about 15 feet above me (I ducked back into a hole).
    Well, that sounds absolutely fucking terrifying.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Well, that sounds absolutely fucking terrifying.
    The rockfall certainly was..... but the the rope, it was severed but held together with a few strands of inner core. My partner didn't realize it until it reached his belay device, and he made the decision to not tell me until I clipped into the anchors.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
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    2
    I personally use either a Mammut Infinity 9.5 60m or the Black Diamond 70m 9.6 Dry. I find both beeing very similar in handeling but the better dry treatment on the BD rope is good as with the extra 10m. However I might just shell out for a Infinity Dry 70 or 80m as I love my 60 and I have several friends that love their mammut ropes too.

    But get at least a 70m rope. Makes rapples easier, unless you lead with a tagline, and a lot of new sport routes got 30m pitches where a 60m might be on the edge of too short.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Tahoe
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    bought a used very lightly 70m mammut eternity (don't know if it's classic, protect, or dry) and I love it. However I was repelling on just one strand recently and found it uncomfortably slick with a guide atc. Maybe once it wears in a bit more.
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  21. #21
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    What diameter rope, and ATC? I have never had an issue with skinny ropes and ATCs, but it can be a concern, not just in rapping, but belaying as well. Best to back up a rap with an autoblock, and know you have a competent belayer if any questions about your ATC.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post
    What diameter rope, and ATC?
    Mammut Eternity is 9.8mm, no? AFAIK, there's only one version of Guide ATC, which is spec'd to for as skinny as 7.7mm ropes (although I wouldn't dare rap on a single 8mm line without adding significant friction in the system).

    Auto block is always good advice. IME (I'm bigger than the average climber), for single strand raps with it's a good idea to add friction to the system, e.g., add a biner, curl rope around biner, etc.

  23. #23
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    the Eternity is 9.8, so not skinny. Guide ATC, oriented the right direction. Was slick and the hand was getting super hot. Backed up with prusik.
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    33
    Using the Mammut Serenity 8.7mm. It handles well, feeds through the Gri Gri easily, durable, and super lightweight.

  25. #25
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    Anyone using anything thinner? Thinking of something for just rapping like a Petzl RAD.

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