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  1. #51
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    In addition to the bike multitool, I carry a CRKT Zilla Tool Jr



    3.8oz gives me good pliers/cutters and a locking 5.7cm knife (it also has interchangable microdriver bits and comes with a phillips and flathead)

    I seem to recall using the pliers to fix chain issues (grabbing stuck chains, breaking a masterlink) but it is more multipurpose than a dedicated set of link tires.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  2. #52
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    Sep 2009
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    626
    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    I periodically think about buying and carrying one of those quick link pliers. Or the pricier, less slick one that OneUp just released. But then I think about how I’m already carrying a chain breaker and extra quick links. I keep concluding that $25 bucks and extra clutter doesn’t buy me enough added utility.
    Definitely open to a persuasive argument though ......


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    I recently bought the Wolflink tool. On longer rides I still carry my chain breaker so there's overlap. But this tool is really light and sits flat in my toolkit. Works really well on a masterlink (way better than pliers, chain breaker fumbling), holds 2 spares, plus it has a valve core remover!

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Aspen
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    I pack a 26" light tube instead of a 27.5" standard tube to save 100g and some space.

  4. #54
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    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    7,941
    I carry road tubes for the same reason/purpose.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  5. #55
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    Feb 2008
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    Donner Summit
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    601
    Why would you need to break a master link in the field? The only time I've done this at home was to replace the rear derailleur. Even there I could have removed the pulley wheels instead.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by teledad View Post
    Why would you need to break a master link in the field? The only time I've done this at home was to replace the rear derailleur. Even there I could have removed the pulley wheels instead.
    I've had a chain get horribly bent and removing it was the only option.

    I've had a chain get horribly stuck and breaking the master made it far easier to yard on from the right direction to get it unstuck.

    The point of having a master link is to make it EASY to remove a chain so you don't have to pop a pin or do things like remove derailleur pulleys... or carry a special tool!

    The idea of a masterlink tool is great for a shop. A masterlink tool for the trail is just silly! Pliers have many uses.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  7. #57
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    Jan 2008
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    Whistler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    The idea of a masterlink tool is great for a shop. A masterlink tool for the trail is just silly! Pliers have many uses.
    Do you think you can open your master link with those pliers?
    Quote Originally Posted by teledad View Post
    Why would you need to break a master link in the field? The only time I've done this at home was to replace the rear derailleur. Even there I could have removed the pulley wheels instead.
    I have had to break a chain to pull it out of a buddies frame/chain guide.
    I carry a spare link, but if I'm going to be cutting a bad section of chain off, I want to remove the quicklink and use it again.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,612
    Only time I've had to remove a master in the field I had bent (maybe twisted) the installed master. Multi-tool has a chain breaker for the other links, but pliers and wire work fine for the 1% of links.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    7,941
    Guy I typically ride with showed up yesterday with a Garmin inReach mini in his pack. The initial outlay of $350 isn't insignificant, but he's only paying $12/month for the cheapest service package, which isn't bad. This covers a lot of my concerns about riding in the backcountry. It'll probably end up being a Christmas present, but I've decided that this is something I want to start carrying.

    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Guy I typically ride with showed up yesterday with a Garmin inReach mini in his pack. The initial outlay of $350 isn't insignificant, but he's only paying $12/month for the cheapest service package, which isn't bad. This covers a lot of my concerns about riding in the backcountry. It'll probably end up being a Christmas present, but I've decided that this is something I want to start carrying.

    More extensive discussion here: https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...99#post5381599
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  11. #61
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    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    I figured these things were being discussed elsewhere, thanks. I've been considering one for the past couple years, but hearing about some recent calamities from riding buddies, and the insanely small size of the mini, have me ready to buy.

    I'd be getting it for the SOS feature, mainly. I don't see it getting much use, beyond sending the occasional preset message. Of course, that could change once I'm carrying it.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by teledad View Post
    Why would you need to break a master link in the field? The only time I've done this at home was to replace the rear derailleur. Even there I could have removed the pulley wheels instead.
    besides all the already mentioned reasons if you break a derhanger and you don't pack a spare I have had to shorten a chain to make a bike into an SS to limp out

    Sram quick links come apart without pliers IME and I carry a spare but shimano use or used the pin you drive in and break off the excess which is gona need a chain breaker

    https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5034-5...BoCsMUQAvD_BwE

    for 20$ you can get an ok chain breaker on the super grande mini tool
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  13. #63
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    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fart Collins
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    4,162
    https://sahmurai.com/
    I sprung for the Sahmurai Sword plug kit for a few reasons:
    1. I like buying things. Especially things new and different.
    2. Half the price of the shiny Dynaplug that I thought long and hard about.
    3. Read a review somewhere suggesting that Sahmurai's fat plugs were superior.
    4. I can never keep push in bar end caps in my handlebars, so literally had a good spot for them.
    5. In theory, nothing is faster than ganking it out of the bar end and jamming that fucker in place.

    First flat came within days of arrival. Unfortunately, the Sahmurai is set up as a one shot deal. And I got a classic two-hole pinch flat. Total and complete fail. Threw in a tube. Realized the Sahmurai bacon is waaay too long and impossible to cut in the field. Hung out like a piece of toilet paper stuck to your shoe. Listened to it tap the bike on every revolution, but fuck it didn't stay the fuck in!

    Got home, cut bacon in half, rethreaded and rubber banded the second half bacon to the reamer thing in the other plug. See if these things work next time. Have better appreciation for the Dynaplug bacon with the metal tips. Also realize that the Racer has similar limited utility of the Sahmurai.
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  14. #64
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    Oct 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    https://sahmurai.com/
    I sprung for the Sahmurai Sword plug kit for a few reasons:
    1. I like buying things. Especially things new and different.
    2. Half the price of the shiny Dynaplug that I thought long and hard about.
    3. Read a review somewhere suggesting that Sahmurai's fat plugs were superior.
    4. I can never keep push in bar end caps in my handlebars, so literally had a good spot for them.
    5. In theory, nothing is faster than ganking it out of the bar end and jamming that fucker in place.

    First flat came within days of arrival. Unfortunately, the Sahmurai is set up as a one shot deal. And I got a classic two-hole pinch flat. Total and complete fail. Threw in a tube. Realized the Sahmurai bacon is waaay too long and impossible to cut in the field. Hung out like a piece of toilet paper stuck to your shoe. Listened to it tap the bike on every revolution, but fuck it didn't stay the fuck in!

    Got home, cut bacon in half, rethreaded and rubber banded the second half bacon to the reamer thing in the other plug. See if these things work next time. Have better appreciation for the Dynaplug bacon with the metal tips. Also realize that the Racer has similar limited utility of the Sahmurai.
    That was very helpful in my decision making as I was planning to upgrade from the genuine Innovations to the dynaplug or Samurai. Thank you. Dynaplug it is.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    I'm going to focus on emergency stuff because I'm not going to have any cool repair ideas that bike gurus haven't already mentioned.

    COMMUNICATIONS: Whistle, Cellphone, PLB

    REPAIR: Includes tape and a multitool that has a good knife

    1st AID KIT:
    3x gloves
    Pain reliever
    Alcohol wipes
    Bandaids (tough)
    4" coban roll
    Triangular bandage + safety pin
    Hemostatic Gauze
    SWAT-T Tourniquet
    10mL NS flush syringe
    Numask
    28fr adjustable flange NPA + Lube

    With that kit you and some improvisation you can treat:
    Road Rash
    Extremity Fracture
    Laceration/severe bleeding

    It's not going to be pretty, but it is cheap, light, and should get you out or help your friend until professional rescue arrives.

    Whistle is important because if you are off the side of the trail, nobody riding by with their eyes on the trail will see you and they may not hear you, especially with earbuds in. One time I endoed off trail down an embankment and fractured my knee cap. Luckily I dragged myself and my bike onto the trail and rode out.

    PLB (or InReach) a simple little ride just two miles on a trail between neighborhoods, my wife wrecked in a small area where her phone didn't work. Her knee was sliced to the bone the full width of her leg on the front. She couldn't stand up. She bandaged herself with the above medkit and activated the PLB. Help came.
    I refined my bike trauma kit and made it much lighter. It does rely on the innertube from my repair kit to serve as a sling or tourniquet (it's a 27.5" 2.2-2.4" tube, but it weights the same as a tourniquet+triangular) and a hand pump to serve as splinting support.

    1st AID KIT:
    2x gloves
    Pain reliever
    Povidone Iodine packet + Castille Soap wipe packet (tiny handwipe like you get from a BBQ place)
    Bandaids (tough)
    3x8" non-stick gauze pad
    1" Tape
    4" Trauma Dressing (this serves as an ACE wrap or pressure dressing)
    Celox Rapid Z-fold Hemostatic Gauze
    10mL NS flush syringe
    CPR barrier (serves as a chest seal or abdominal tent)
    3.5" mini trauma shears (0.5 oz)
    28fr adjustable flange NPA + Lube (First Responders and above)
    10ga 3.25" angiocath + 3way (Advanced providers at your own hazard)

    With that kit you and some improvisation you can treat:
    Road Rash
    Extremity Fracture
    Laceration/severe bleeding

    This 1st aid kit weighs in at a mere 8oz, less than a pump + multitool!
    Last edited by Summit; 07-11-2018 at 02:24 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  16. #66
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    Apr 2008
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    Fart Collins
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    That was very helpful in my decision making as I was planning to upgrade from the genuine Innovations to the dynaplug or Samurai. Thank you. Dynaplug it is.
    Which Dynaplug kit did you get? Seems like having some of the larger plugs would be mandatory.
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  17. #67
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    Oct 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    Which Dynaplug kit did you get? Seems like having some of the larger plugs would be mandatory.
    I agree that having both plug sizes would be a big help. I'm split between:

    Racer with a mega and regular loaded and mounted then keeping reloads in my repair kit.

    Megaplug with a mega and regular loaded but only one mounted with reloads in the plastic container.

    Both are the same price. Probably six one way half dozen the other. Order from Dynaplug they ship free.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  18. #68
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    Feb 2013
    Location
    Methow Valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    28fr adjustable flange NPA + Lube
    10ga 3.25" angiocath + 3way
    What is the purpose of these? It's outside the scope of anything I know so I wouldn't put them in my first aid kit, but you obviously have a higher knowledge of this stuff.

  19. #69
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    Oct 2003
    Location
    Ogden
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    What is the purpose of these? It's outside the scope of anything I know so I wouldn't put them in my first aid kit, but you obviously have a higher knowledge of this stuff.
    The first one is a big old tube to stick in someones nose to secure an airway and the second one is a big old needle to stick in someones chest to treat a tension pneumo.

  20. #70
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    Feb 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    The first one is a big old tube to stick in someones nose to secure an airway and the second one is a big old needle to stick in someones chest to treat a tension pneumo.
    Thanks. Dynaplug will probably make an attachment for those in the next few years

  21. #71
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    Oct 2007
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    the junkshow
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    Quote Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
    The first one is a big old tube to stick in someones nose to secure an airway and the second one is a big old needle to stick in someones chest to treat a tension pneumo.
    Yep, and I believe, if I'm not mistaken, they require additional certification and skills in order to use. Therefore, your average Joe Schmoe ain't gonna be carrying them in their pack. In fact, the chances of someone needing them on your average trail are pretty slim but if you have the skill to use them and they don't weigh much, why not.

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by John_B View Post
    What is the purpose of these? It's outside the scope of anything I know so I wouldn't put them in my first aid kit, but you obviously have a higher knowledge of this stuff.
    28fr adjustable flange NPA + Lube

    Name:  adj_naso__39598.1484956874.275.275.jpg
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    NPA = NasoPharengeal Airway

    It is a rubber tube that goes up the nose (with some lube so you don't tear things up) all up and around the corner and ends up behind the tongue. Its purpose is to hold the tongue off the back of the throat to keep a person's airway open. If you take a EMT or First Responder class (WFR or EMR) you'll learn how to use NPAs (they are incredibly simple to use). When you would use this biking is on a buddy who is doing very badly in terms of reduced consciousness to the point where they cannot automatically keep muscle tone on their tongue so that it doesn't fall back under gravity and block their throat so that they cannot breath. Problems that might cause this: head injury, severe blood loss, severe chest trauma, struck by lightning, heart attack, overdose of certain drugs, blocked airways due to trauma or asthma, etc. In other words, they are going to be critically ill. The NPA holds the airway open and frees up your hands.

    For trained folks: Sizing is the nares to the angle of the jaw (NOT nostril size or pinky size as you might have been taught, it just has to be thin enough to fit). Length is what is important (that's what she said). It must be long enough to get behind the tongue but not so long as to trigger a gag reflex. On an adjustable NPA, the rubber ring slides to adjust length so one NPA can fit many patients. An adjustable 28fr will fit most adults. An adjustable 26fr or 24fr will fit most average adults to most adolescents. (NPA size adjustability and usability with an intact gag makes them a better choice over an OPA if you are going to carry just one basic airway).

    If you don't have the training to use these and the patient's airway isn't staying open, you have two choices:

    1. NO TRAUMA: use the recovery position (from your CPR class) which uses gravity and position to keep the airway open and also gravity drain and secretions or vomit. This position is key if you must leave their side (e.g., to summon help):
    Name:  recovery_pos.gif
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    2. WITH TRAUMA: you want to avoid manipulating the spine in trauma with altered consciousness. You can use the trauma-jaw-thrust technique but this requires hands on (and some significant force from your hands if they have muscle tone in their jaw).

    10ga 3.25" angiocath + 3way

    This tool is something that you'll learn to use if you re a paramedic, nurse, or provider (or TCCC if you were military). It is an unusually large gauge and long needle with a plastic IV catheter over it. Broken ribs and pneumothorax (hole in the lung that leaks air into the chest cavity) are a common injury in mtb crashes. A deadly potential complication is tension pneumothorax where so much air builds up that the lungs cannot inflate enough and it impairs the heart's ability to receive blood. Apart from massive external bleeding, a tension pneumo is really the only other deadly complication of trauma that can be mitigated on the trail. Every other type of deadly complication of trauma (e.g., shock from internal bleeding, severe head injury, internal organ damage from blunt trauma) either kills you or you are brought to an operating room before it kills you. To temporarily fix tension, one sticks that giant needle in between the ribs to relieve the pressure. I won't describe the diagnostic/decision process or the invasive procedure here. It's not hard, but doing it when it isn't needed or doing it wrong could lead complications like creating an open pneumothorax, lacerating the heart or great vessels, puncturing the liver or spleen, infection etc. Needless to say, this is something that would be used by a trained professional in desperation on someone they care about who is about to die.

    For trained providers, the evidence suggests: A. 10ga is superior to 14ga. B. 1.75" is unreliably short compared to a 3+". C. 4-5th ICS on the AAL (or MAL) is far more reliable than the 2nd ICS on the ICL (and also useful if the ICL is obscured by chest armor yet to be cut away). I'm happy to provide the journal articles on these points.

    ETA: I spent 10 minutes typing up what zion zig zag covered in 2 sentences!
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  23. #73
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    Nov 2005
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    Down In A Hole, Up in the Sky
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    This thread is now officially terrifying.
    StokePimpin' ain't easy

  24. #74
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    PNW
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    I'm never leaving the couch again. Too scary.

    😎
    PE, Mechanical Engineering

  25. #75
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    Oct 2003
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    9,300ft
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideit View Post
    This thread is now officially terrifying.
    While it completely blows my mind how many bikers don't even carry a bandaid with them, re-read this post until you aren't terrified:

    Quote Originally Posted by shredgnar View Post
    In fact, the chances of someone needing them on your average trail are pretty slim but if you have the skill to use them and they don't weigh much, why not.
    I agree with him. In 15 years of SAR, I haven't seen a bike wreck patient who has needed such things (giant needle). It *could* be needed and I know how to use them, and they are very light/cheap, so I have them.

    Now, bike/ski patrol at lift served certainly have seen the need. So have backcountry skiers and snowmobilers (avalanches or smashing trees or botching a cliff huck).
    Last edited by Summit; 07-11-2018 at 02:46 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

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