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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    7,684
    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Yeah, I only have a small, lightweight fanny pack, and am not a fan when it's loaded. I've been wondering about something that rides low, but has shoulder support. Do you have the Henty? I was also looking at the Source Hipster. Honestly, makes me wish I would have gotten a Wingnut years ago.
    Yeah, I have the henty. Also had a wingnut until it died.

    Henty isn't too big. Basically just a medium-large fanny pack, but the shoulder straps keep it a lot more stable when loaded, and they don't make it too hot.

    Wingnut was a real backpack and held a lot more stuff, but was definitely hotter.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    378
    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Andeh, you like the LR? Coming to the conclusion that a fanny pack isn’t for me, but don’t think I can go back to a regular pack.
    I like it:
    * I try to carry as little water as possible - it has a giant 3L bladder, so it's easy to carry more than you need
    * The rear straps on the back work well for securing a removable helmet chinbar (for Bell Super, you can just run the outer pouch buckle through one of the face holes, and tuck the wrap around ends through the lower loops. For Leatt, you can flip it upside down and lock it in place with the lower loops).
    * left hip belt pocket fits my Pixel 2 and some chap stick
    * right hip belt pocket fits 3 gels
    * includes a nice tool roll
    * for longer / more serious rides, I can carry 3L of water, food, first aid, tools, elbow pads, and goggles all inside my pack. That's pretty heavy though.
    * while the weight does sit lower, and the pack rides up a lot less than, say, the old MULE, it can still ride up a few inches on really rough descents. If I know I'm going into something like that, I make sure to crank down the hip belt.
    * it's probably a bit cooler (in terms of letting your back breath) than a normal pack, but it's still very warm in comparison to a hip belt. That's a major reason I reach for my bum bag a lot.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    1,132
    Quote Originally Posted by panchosdad View Post
    Anyone tried one of these for on bike storage? Carrying a pump is one reason I carry a pack even on shorter rides, this might eliminate that need.

    https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...ducts/pump-bag
    Haven't tried that one in particular but I have a few small bags that mount to frame or bars for bikepacking or long day rides. I like them, and this one would work to hold a pump which a lot of bags aren't long enough to do. I'd double check the pump length though.

    Not much I can add to the lists posted. I tend to use the same pretty heavy pack for most of my rides so I always carry most things mentioned. I'm used to it and the pack doesn't bother me. I'd rather have everything in the same pack all the time than try to move stuff around and inevitably forget something important. For short local rides I'll sometimes go pack-less, tool-less and water-less or just use one of afore-mentioned frame/bar bags. Only had to do the walk of shame once so far...

    I've probably used zip ties and the wraps of duct tape around my pump more than anything. I've also learned the hard way to carry a pump and CO2 and presta/schraeder adaptor. I've had a pump suddenly fail to work on one of few occasions when I didn't have CO2/adaptor on me. Had to bail on a 3-day bikepack and limp out on an underinflated rear tire. I tend to bring spares for anything reasonable to carry that could leave me stranded - so a shifter cable, tube (or 2), D-hanger, quick links, brake pads/clips, spare bolts, are always there. I normally carry a light and spare headlamp too as plenty of my rides end in the dark, planned or not. Also carry tire repair kit with bacon, needle/thread/glue, patches, etc. Seen tires fail too many ways. Haven't had to sew a tire up yet but a few friends have.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    PRB
    Posts
    19,320
    I always carry a hudge pack with me. Partly because I hate needing/wanting something and not having it, and partly because I hate dealing with putting things back in the pack for long rides, taking them out for short ones, etc.

    Water
    Food
    long sleeve softshell shirt
    lightweight hardshell
    hat
    tube
    pump
    patch kit
    toilet paper
    multi-tool and multi-allen wrench
    leatherman
    ibuprofen
    zip ties
    derailleur hanger
    magic link
    trash bag
    sunglass lenses (unnecessary, as I rarely change lenses after I ride, but if it's in my pack it's always with me at the trailhead, when I do want to change lenses)
    cell phone
    light
    Last edited by Danno; 06-21-2018 at 12:04 PM.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    none
    Posts
    5,993

    What’s In Your Pack (or On The Bike)?

    Do you guys not use seat bags?

    Between my Ibis pork chop and a fairly large seat bag, I have everything I need.
    I ride everyday and it’s a pita to fuck with a pack, unless I’m going on a safari.

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    9,300ft
    Posts
    16,741
    Seat bags rub on rear tires when the dropper is down
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    PRB
    Posts
    19,320
    The pack never bothered me, feels weird to ride without it.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    the junkshow
    Posts
    7,344
    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    Seat bags rub on rear tires when the dropper is down
    These don't:
    https://www.outvi.com

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Shredhead View Post
    Do you guys not use seat bags?

    Between my Ibis pork chop and a fairly large seat bag, I have everything I need.
    I ride everyday and it’s a pita to fuck with a pack, unless I’m going on a safari.
    Water?

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    none
    Posts
    5,993
    Quote Originally Posted by Peruvian View Post
    Water?
    I’m still a bottle guy 90% of the time. I ride at 6am while it’s cool and I don’t usually finish a large bottle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    Seat bags rub on rear tires when the dropper is down
    Yes, it does rub sometimes, but not a ton.
    If I loose the pump and go with a smaller pack, I’m sure I could avoid the rub.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Cuntecticut
    Posts
    1,538
    Small behind the seat Awesome Strap setup. Bottle in the cage. Tool in the pocket. Ahem. A little duct tape, a couple zip ties. A couple spare bolts, quick link, and glue-less patch. Tube. Minimal tire lever. Specialized mini-pump/c02 head and a cartridge.


    Doesn't get in the way of the dropper or the rear tire when both are fully compressed. Meh.


    The bum pack. A few more bolts, zip ties, and tape. Larger version of the Speci pump/c02 combo and two carts. Guide pads - running the same brakes on all the bikes makes it easy for spares. Another lever. Micro tripod, snacks!, Krkt knife that clips on and doubles as the metal bit where I hook the magnetic hose bit. Shock pump with pointy bits trimmed down. 70oz bladder. The same mini tool. It lives in the car console by my shifter. Gratuitous dog pee pic. This setup now gets probably most of my ride time, and the larger packs only when really needing more water in hot humid summer times or carrying more food/clothing/beverages for longer/colder/social-er rides.


    BIgger pack is bigger. More little bits. Usually a 2nd tube. A larger folding knife. 100oz bladder. Pouches for phone/camera. More room for more stuff as needed.


    Ancillary bits. Saw can get strapped near anywhere for spring cleanup rides. Cut-down bottle and Awesome Strap works well to keep things safe in the bottle cage. BD USB recharged lamp lives in the car and gets taken when pushing daylight may be an issue. A beer coozie works well to protect the phone. Micro tool and Spibelt work great in pockets for lift days.


    Honorable mentions: Race Face Stash tank. Get a lot of use when not crazy hot and needing more water - 50oz bladder and bits fit fine without bouncing or feeling unwieldy. Best thing for winter - keeps water from freezing. Lots of leftover XC 3-pocket jerseys with the sleeves hacked off. Race Face Ambush shorts. The side/rear cargo pockets are freakin' amazing. Multi tool, camera, keys, whatever. Don't bounce around, don't get in the way of pedaling. Salsa tank bag, thing, whatever. Fits near anywhere. Holds stuff. Keeps more off my body. Also have another larger Osprey pack, and a fairly ancient but huge Camelbak Octane something pack that expands or zips down as needed.

    A fairly decent sized and capable first-aid bag lives in the back of the car and gets tossed into the bigger packs to ride-along at times.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,610
    I just got a butt dial from Florence--she didn't call on purpose, but she did say you should simplify.

    ETA: Bonus bonus points for catching the dog in the act. Well played, sir.

  13. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    7,937
    Thanks toast and Andeh!

    Wolf Tooth definitely makes some great stuff, but it all seems overpriced for what you're getting.

    I've been able to cut down on weight by carrying a filter instead of trying to haul all of my water. After going back to bottles, I prefer them, and it allows me to limit pack weight to tools and such. We have pretty consistent access to water in the valleys between climbs, but I know that's not the case for everybody.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whistler
    Posts
    1,448
    How many CO2 canisters do you guys carry. I'm not talking about epics or multi days, I mean everyday rides where a limp to the trail head or a phone call for a pick up is possible.
    I carry one 16g and one 25g canister. My experience is when I hear or feel a puncture I use a plug kit and top off the tire with a 16g. When the plug does not hold and I have to put in a tube, or when I completely blow a tire and cut a sidewall and have to use a tube I have a 25g to get me to full inflation.

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    9,300ft
    Posts
    16,741
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    How many CO2 canisters do you guys carry. I'm not talking about epics or multi days, I mean everyday rides where a limp to the trail head or a phone call for a pick up is possible.
    I carry one 16g and one 25g canister. My experience is when I hear or feel a puncture I use a plug kit and top off the tire with a 16g. When the plug does not hold and I have to put in a tube, or when I completely blow a tire and cut a sidewall and have to use a tube I have a 25g to get me to full inflation.
    I think you need at least 2 in that instance if you don't carry a pump. Many times you miss something on the first fix and need another fill or put in a tube. On long rides I also carry sealant and a hand pump.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    10,027
    Quote Originally Posted by Summit View Post
    I think you need at least 2 in that instance if you don't carry a pump. Many times you miss something on the first fix and need another fill or put in a tube. On long rides I also carry sealant and a hand pump.
    I usually have one big and one small at least... they don't take up much room, so sometimes I just stuff an extra in there.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    7,937
    Two 16s so I don't have to pump, but I have a pump strapped to the bike cause I've been let down by C02 too many times.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whistler
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Two 16s so I don't have to pump, but I have a pump strapped to the bike cause I've been let down by C02 too many times.
    I also have a pump that accepts C02s, thats my go to for longer rides.

  19. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    2,256
    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    <snip>
    I've been able to cut down on weight by carrying a filter instead of trying to haul all of my water. After going back to bottles, I prefer them, and it allows me to limit pack weight to tools and such. We have pretty consistent access to water in the valleys between climbs, but I know that's not the case for everybody.
    Yup - I've taken to this on rides that I know will have regular water access. A 3oz Sawyer Squeeze is way better than bothering with liters of water.

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fart Collins
    Posts
    4,162

    What’s In Your Pack (or On The Bike)?

    Just put together a rudimentary first aid kit.
    (Costco card for size reference)
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    10pk Of 4x4 gauze
    ABD pad
    1 roll 2” Coban
    3ft 2 sided Velcro
    Pk 1/2” steri strips
    3x3 bandages
    Pill bottle with:
    3x Benadryl
    10x Ibuprophen
    10x acetaminophen
    Saline bullets (eye drops)
    Shitter/Cleanup/Bio Bag
    4x baby wipes
    2x dog poop bags
    Quart sized ziplock


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    9,300ft
    Posts
    16,741
    When I put together a kit, whether its basic, repair, or medical, I choose items based on their likelihood to meet the following philosophies:

    • Prevent – prevents likely significant problems
    • Fix – Turns likely/serious disruptions into non-issues
    • Survive – Makes critical problems survivable


    Then I think about likelihood vs consequences when I'm asking "do I really want to carry a solution to that problem?"

    Examples of the basics on a long ride: water is prevention (prevents dehydration) while a rain jacket is a fix, but a space blanket is a survival item.

    Flat repair kit and tools are a fix. Flats are common, impact, and usually completely fixable.

    For medical, prevention is nutrition, hydration, and protection. Head injureis are the most common injuries for XC bikers. Maxillofacial fractures are very common. So we we wear helmets maybe with detachable chinguards (facial fractures are more common among XC riders than DH riders because DH riders wear FFs almost universally). Fractured knee caps are surprisingly rare with DH bikers because the prevalence of knee pads (I wear lightweight knee/shin pads XC). Clavicular fractures are common with DH because of speed and inability to really protect the clavical.

    Some bandaids, nonstick pads, iburprofen, and tape are fixes. Why? Because lacerations, abrasions and contusion are the most common minor injuries.

    For medical-survival, you have to think of things you can actually mitigate severe injuries with light weight interventions on the trail. The most common severe injuries for all types of MTB that you can mitigate with minimal gear/training are extremity fracture/sprain (vet wrap and splinting), severe hemorrhage (hemostatics, pressure bandage, tourniquet). If you are a FR or EMT, then add failure to maintain airway (NPA).
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whistler
    Posts
    1,448
    How do you remove a quick link in the field? In the good old days of 9 speed you could open them with your bare hands. Now with 11s and 12s they are designed to be broken with a tool.

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Down In A Hole, Up in the Sky
    Posts
    24,078
    Just got one of these, holds a few links as well.
    Wolftooth.

    StokePimpin' ain't easy

  24. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,610
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    How do you remove a quick link in the field? In the good old days of 9 speed you could open them with your bare hands. Now with 11s and 12s they are designed to be broken with a tool.
    Nothing wrong with the tool, but I just carry wire since I've got a pair of pliers anyway and the wire is nice for other things, as well as keeping the spare link halves together. Wrap wire around link, twist with pliers until tight enough to pop the link. I haven't tried it with string of any kind, but that probably works, too--twist with a longish stick, like an improvised tourniquet.

  25. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fart Collins
    Posts
    4,162
    I periodically think about buying and carrying one of those quick link pliers. Or the pricier, less slick one that OneUp just released. But then I think about how I’m already carrying a chain breaker and extra quick links. I keep concluding that $25 bucks and extra clutter doesn’t buy me enough added utility.
    Definitely open to a persuasive argument though ......


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

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