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  1. #26
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    I rarely ever tip for takeout unless I have a filled punch card or something like that.
    Bartenders get 50 cents to a dollar (usually a dollar) per drink or $2 for a pitcher.
    Couple three extra bucks for barber, taxi, delivery (although up to $4 for delivery if the driving conditions are shitty. Usually 3).
    Dine in is 20% unless shitty service or it's the kind of place where you bus your own table.
    Ski/bike shop rats love beer, but it's not expected unless it was a rush job, something you didn't have to pay for or something nice.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by oftpiste View Post
    Uber/Lyft
    The drivers "rate" the passenger just as the passenger rates the driver. Drivers see your rating when they get the notification to accept the passenger. Recently I landed at the airport at 2am and needed a ride home. The driver told me he refused to accept a few other passengers due to their low ratings that evening. For a few extra bucks, I'll tip to keep my rating high and get the ride home 40+ miles at 2am. If you want to help get a higher rating tip your driver cash as they can not accept another passenger until they have rated you. This means even if you tip via the app, they won't know till long after they have rated you that you tipped.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    I've never been a waiter. I wonder how often servers pool tips and how often tips are shared with the cooks and bussers, and how those employees are paid compared to servers.
    It does depend on the restaurants. Most do not pool tips.

    At the end of the night, servers generally tip out bartenders, bussers and food runners. I want to say itís 1-2% of their sales. Not a percentage of their tips.

    I havenít worked in a restaurant but my wife did for years. As a manager she wasnít allowed to get in the middle of any tip outs because it wasnít company money, but a couple times there were big fights of a bartender felt like they got stiffed.

    Back of house generally doesnít get tipped out. Most of them make pretty decent money it sounds like. The one restaurant where the cooks got tipped out that my wife worked at she said they were all the laziest most entitled cooks sheís ever seen. Lol.

  4. #29
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    Most decent restaurants the servers have a mandatory tip out for the kitchen up to 3% of SALES, not tips received.

    So if you stiff the server on a tip, she's still paying the kitchen, now out of her own pocket.
    Last edited by BCJC; 06-16-2018 at 03:47 PM. Reason: typo

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gepeto View Post
    I generally pay attention to who is serving me. Anyone who is an independent contractor; plumber, barber, mechanic - running their own business get no tip as they should have already guaranteed what they expect to be paid.

    If your working for someone else at a flat rate or percentage of the take (read; someone else is making money from your effort), you entitled to a tip.
    Interesting point, makes sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by BCJC View Post
    Most decent restaurants the servers have a mandatory tip out for the kitchen up to 3% of SALES, not tips received.

    So if you stiff the server on a tip, she's still paying the kitchen, now out of her own pocket.
    There is so much wrong with this whole restaurant tipping system, ugh.

    Quote Originally Posted by AKPogue View Post
    Did you like Fairbanks?
    Well, I'm still there and trying to figure out how I like it. All these people I don't know how to tip are in Fairbanks.

    As far as the actual town goes, I work at UAF and live fairly close by, so there is rarely any need to venture beyond the great Home-Work-Fred Meyer triangle. There is also no desire to do so. I spend 90% of my time in the peculiar bubble of academia, which has its oddities of local flavour but isn't all that different from the same bubble in other places, I think.

    I arrived in late February, so I missed the really cold and dark phase. Skiland is surprisingly great for what it is (it is a hill with a single ancient chairlift and like 300m of vertical). Is is so much better than nothing. Ester Dome okay for mini touring laps in the trees.

    I bought a hardtail mtb off Craigslist when the snow melted, thinking I would mainly use it for commuting. I do commute on it but it's also kind of become the thing that keeps me sane and makes the bad days better. My commute is about 5 miles and I can do it almost entirely on windy trails through green and white birch woods. The Ester Dome single track is great and the Birch Hill trails are also pretty fun.

    I have had limited success finding people to go on bigger adventures with, so I have explored some of the more straightforward skiing in the Deltas and in the park but wasn't able to do as much as I would have liked in spring. I assume I will be around for at least a large chunk of the next ski season, so I am hoping that I will be able to make better use of that and figure things out some more.

    Aside from a little loneliness here and there and missing home (some days more than others), the main issue is my work situation, which I do not like. I do not fault Fairbanks for that.

    edit: oh yeah, a couple of days ago it was really smoky in town for the first time. I have never lived anywhere where shit burns all the time and I can deal with moskitos and winter but I don't think I could handle a bad fire season.

    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    What do you want to know?
    I don't know what I don't know. Curious about psychedelics but never tried any or stumbled upon a situation where that happened to be an option.

    In terms of understanding the USA, what is the deal with weed, exactly? It is legal in the great state of Alaska. However, I assume you are not supposed to e.g. drive while stoned. How is that enforced, if at all? I was hanging out at the DMV quite a bit to get my local license and they had an amazing little cartoon movie explaining that “these are not your grandmother's brownies” but they didn't go into more practical detail. Also, rumour has it that whether or not it turns into a problem depends on whether you are talking with federal or state law enforcement? What is that supposed to mean?
    Ich bitte dich nur, weck mich nicht.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by klar View Post
    There is so much wrong with this whole restaurant tipping system, ugh.
    Just tip 20% since your waitrons are making shit for wages and oh yeah, trickle down economics.





    I don't know what I don't know. Curious about psychedelics but never tried any or stumbled upon a situation where that happened to be an option.

    In terms of understanding the USA, what is the deal with weed, exactly? It is legal in the great state of Alaska. However, I assume you are not supposed to e.g. drive while stoned. How is that enforced, if at all? I was hanging out at the DMV quite a bit to get my local license and they had an amazing little cartoon movie explaining that “these are not your grandmother's brownies” but they didn't go into more practical detail. Also, rumour has it that whether or not it turns into a problem depends on whether you are talking with federal or state law enforcement? What is that supposed to mean?
    I used to love doing pyschedelics. I've just lost touch with where to get stuff. Mushrooms are around. Try a small dose, it's a wonderful experience.

    Don't drive stoned is the adage. Well, not too stoned. You're likelihood of being harassed in AK, WA, OR is limited to federal land like airports, BLM land, NFS land and National Parks.

    Keksie is a great guy.
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  7. #32
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    I hear it's standard practice to pay attention to the tip in Nevada.
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    the situation strikes me as WAY too much drama at this point

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    Keksie is a great guy.
    Is that a random name drop or are you implying something here? He is great. He is also pretty useless for advice on situationally aware t(r)ipping in the USA.

    So once you set foot in a national park or similar, located within a state where weed is legal, weed is no longer legal?
    Ich bitte dich nur, weck mich nicht.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by klar View Post
    Is that a random name drop or are you implying something here? He is great. He is also pretty useless for advice on situationally aware t(r)ipping in the USA.

    So once you set foot in a national park or similar, located within a state where weed is legal, weed is no longer legal?
    Random name drop...On the tripping advice, get a small dose, have something very simple to do, like swimming in a known spot or a short hike by water. One can spend satisfying hours watching the ripples of a stream. Be in the now. Very D. La Chapelle.

    Yes, evidently the legal issue is that once one sets foot on "Federal" land, it's like crossing a border into hostile territory.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
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  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by klar View Post
    Interesting point, makes sense.



    There is so much wrong with this whole restaurant tipping system, ugh.



    Well, I'm still there and trying to figure out how I like it. All these people I don't know how to tip are in Fairbanks.

    As far as the actual town goes, I work at UAF and live fairly close by, so there is rarely any need to venture beyond the great Home-Work-Fred Meyer triangle. There is also no desire to do so. I spend 90% of my time in the peculiar bubble of academia, which has its oddities of local flavour but isn't all that different from the same bubble in other places, I think.

    I arrived in late February, so I missed the really cold and dark phase. Skiland is surprisingly great for what it is (it is a hill with a single ancient chairlift and like 300m of vertical). Is is so much better than nothing. Ester Dome okay for mini touring laps in the trees.

    I bought a hardtail mtb off Craigslist when the snow melted, thinking I would mainly use it for commuting. I do commute on it but it's also kind of become the thing that keeps me sane and makes the bad days better. My commute is about 5 miles and I can do it almost entirely on windy trails through green and white birch woods. The Ester Dome single track is great and the Birch Hill trails are also pretty fun.

    I have had limited success finding people to go on bigger adventures with, so I have explored some of the more straightforward skiing in the Deltas and in the park but wasn't able to do as much as I would have liked in spring. I assume I will be around for at least a large chunk of the next ski season, so I am hoping that I will be able to make better use of that and figure things out some more.

    Aside from a little loneliness here and there and missing home (some days more than others), the main issue is my work situation, which I do not like. I do not fault Fairbanks for that.

    edit: oh yeah, a couple of days ago it was really smoky in town for the first time. I have never lived anywhere where shit burns all the time and I can deal with moskitos and winter but I don't think I could handle a bad fire season.



    I don't know what I don't know. Curious about psychedelics but never tried any or stumbled upon a situation where that happened to be an option.

    In terms of understanding the USA, what is the deal with weed, exactly? It is legal in the great state of Alaska. However, I assume you are not supposed to e.g. drive while stoned. How is that enforced, if at all? I was hanging out at the DMV quite a bit to get my local license and they had an amazing little cartoon movie explaining that “these are not your grandmother's brownies” but they didn't go into more practical detail. Also, rumour has it that whether or not it turns into a problem depends on whether you are talking with federal or state law enforcement? What is that supposed to mean?
    Weed is a federal crime whether you're on federal land or not, but the chances of getting busted for it off of federal landunless you're a serious black market dealer are very slim . People selling state-legal pot are currently being left alone by the feds but that could change.
    As far as driving under the influence there is no recognized blood level that determines whether you're under the influence. That's not LE's fault; the science doesn't exist. In the absence of a reliable test for intoxication it will come down to the observation of the officer observing the driver and a field sobriety test plus a tox screen showing the presence of any intoxicant--including legal intoxicants like prescribed sedatives and anithistamines. Assume that if you're cited you'll likely be unsuccessful in challenging the citation unless you luck out and your judge is a stoner. (Many are)

    Depending on the state there may also be laws about how MJ can be transported in a car--in CA it has to be in an unopened sealed container although I don't know how often this law is being enforced, and it's only a $100 infraction. Look up AK law.

    Old Goat, Esq, JDG (Doctor of google jurisprudence)
    Last edited by old goat; 06-16-2018 at 09:12 PM.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by klar View Post
    Well, I'm still there and trying to figure out how I like it. All these people I don't know how to tip are in Fairbanks.

    As far as the actual town goes, I work at UAF and live fairly close by, so there is rarely any need to venture beyond the great Home-Work-Fred Meyer triangle. There is also no desire to do so. I spend 90% of my time in the peculiar bubble of academia, which has its oddities of local flavour but isn't all that different from the same bubble in other places, I think.

    I arrived in late February, so I missed the really cold and dark phase. Skiland is surprisingly great for what it is (it is a hill with a single ancient chairlift and like 300m of vertical). Is is so much better than nothing. Ester Dome okay for mini touring laps in the trees.

    I bought a hardtail mtb off Craigslist when the snow melted, thinking I would mainly use it for commuting. I do commute on it but it's also kind of become the thing that keeps me sane and makes the bad days better. My commute is about 5 miles and I can do it almost entirely on windy trails through green and white birch woods. The Ester Dome single track is great and the Birch Hill trails are also pretty fun.

    I have had limited success finding people to go on bigger adventures with, so I have explored some of the more straightforward skiing in the Deltas and in the park but wasn't able to do as much as I would have liked in spring. I assume I will be around for at least a large chunk of the next ski season, so I am hoping that I will be able to make better use of that and figure things out some more.

    Aside from a little loneliness here and there and missing home (some days more than others), the main issue is my work situation, which I do not like. I do not fault Fairbanks for that.

    edit: oh yeah, a couple of days ago it was really smoky in town for the first time. I have never lived anywhere where shit burns all the time and I can deal with moskitos and winter but I don't think I could handle a bad fire season.
    I used to patrol at Skiland, it is a cool little place. If you haven't yet, hit up Moose Mt just to check it out the bus served skiing. There is so much to do in AK, I only found time to do just a little bit.

    There are some clubs to get involved with to meet people. Try http://www.alaskaalpineclub.com/ and get on their email list. They have a lot of different events and you can meet people that way to get out with. They have a mountaineering class in the spring and are always looking for people to help lead trips and it's also another good way to meet like minded people. There are also https://www.fairbankscycleclub.org/ and https://www.nscfairbanks.org/ The cross country skiing during the winter is great there. The cross country ski club has a swap meet in the fall so you can get some cheap gear if you don't have any cross country ski gear.

    I spent 5 years in Fairbanks and 1 summer just sucked for fires. It got so bad in town you could only see about 400 meters and there was a concern the fire was going to make it to Fairbanks. Luckily it didn't.

    Another cool event in AK is the Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic that is going to be held in beginning of August.
    The pacifists always lose, because the anti-pacifists kill them.

  12. #37
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    Situationally aware tipping in the USA like a decent person - how to ?

    Itís definitely not weird to give a six pack to a bike shop, Iíve done that a few times when they helped me out with something a little out of the ordinary.

    Even as an American there are times every now and then when Iím not sure whether I should tip or not or, if yes, how much. Itís a really stupid system.

    Also sitting in a nice subalpine Alaskan forest and eating some mushrooms sounds like a good idea.

  13. #38
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    I tip my local ski shop beer to fast track things. Got a wax 15 before closing with a 12 pack.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoon View Post
    Back of house generally doesn’t get tipped out. Most of them make pretty decent money it sounds like. The one restaurant where the cooks got tipped out that my wife worked at she said they were all the laziest most entitled cooks she’s ever seen. Lol.
    In my experience, which was long ago, back of the house doesn't make shit (except for the exec chef and his sous) and didn't get tipped out. And they bust their asses in sometimes pretty miserable conditions. Sucked making close to minimum and watching servers pay each other $100 just to cover shifts because they didn't feel like working. Best days I had right before I got out of that were when I got to work front of the house when they didn't need me in the kitchen and were short up front. In a good (expensive) restaurant servers make real money.
    [quote][//quote]

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by klar View Post
    I continue my struggle to understand life in the United States of America.

    I get restaurant situations, they spell it out for you after all, but am unsure what to do when nobody gives me my options expressed in percent on the bill.

    Am I supposed to tip taxi drivers? If so, how much? I just booked an airport shuttle thing and it says 'gratuity is up to you' - I assume that means I am supposed to tip, but how much? Do I hand the person cash if I have prepaid the rest of the fare? (Nobody really seems to carry cash?) What about regular taxis?

    I had my bicycle in a shop to get some things fixed and paid about 150$ for work and mostly parts. Everyone at the shop was really nice. At home I would expect a communal tip jar in a place like this and I would have thrown something in because they went out of their way, not because it would normally be expected. A six pack of beer or something along those lines would also be appropriate if they did something super special. Huge cash tips or just handing the guy some extra money would be weird and borderline insulting since they are professional bike mechanics and it would be like implying they need me to do them a charitable favour, like you would not tip, say, a car mechanic or a plumber either (right???) because this is a professional who is charging an appropriate amount for their time (right???).

    The idea of trying to tip someone I'm not supposed to be tipping makes me feel way more awkward than undertipping (I don't want to do that either but that thought does not trigger the same level of cringe).

    Can I get some general guidelines please?
    Itís important to learn how workers are paid in a given situation.
    There are situations in this country where a minimum legal wage is absurdly low to, in theory, account for tip income. Servers and taxi drivers are not typically paid an appropriate hourly wage for that work without tip income.

    The rest is just a discussion of taste and classiness, etc.... but as a working class person I implore you to tip servers and drivers always (without tip income I made like $3-$4 per hour as a taxi driver) and well if you like them and want them to earn a living wage.

  16. #41
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    Servers and drivers:
    tip always (~20%)
    tip well (+30...50...or more %) at your discretion based on experience.

    Others who make a reasonable base wage:
    tip at your discretion based on experience.

    When in doubt, it’s fair to ask how ppl are paid and what a high/low/typical tip is for them. If they can’t have that discussion in a suitable way, to me that’s an indication they’re not reliant on tip income and I can tip lightly if at all.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by jorion View Post
    Also sitting in a nice subalpine Alaskan forest and eating some mushrooms sounds like a good idea.
    When I was a young man working in Haines, four of us set up camp across Chilkat Bay from the Rainbow(?) Glacier, dropped acid and watched the glacier calve. Pickup, gas generator, 100’ extension cord, 100w amp, studio speakers, & the complete works of Pink Floyd. It did calve that night-pretty fucking spectacular when you see the ice fall into the water, then hear it a few seconds later.

    Then a bus full of tourists off the cruise ships showed up at 1AM - that was kinda awkward, as we were dancing around naked in the early July gloaming at the time...

    Klar, be sure to get to Arctic Man next winter http://www.arcticman.com/
    It’s like Burning Man for Alaskans, with a little snow sport competition thrown in.
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  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBS View Post
    Klar, be sure to get to Arctic Man next winter http://www.arcticman.com/
    Itís like Burning Man for Alaskans, with a little snow sport competition thrown in.
    I kind of avoided that on purpose because it sounds like a huge shit show. Less burning man and more hundreds of drunk people on snow machines? Was I wrong about that? one guy got killed this year in a snow machine related accident.

    Quote Originally Posted by ill-advised strategy View Post
    Itís important to learn how workers are paid in a given situation.
    There are situations in this country where a minimum legal wage is absurdly low to, in theory, account for tip income. Servers and taxi drivers are not typically paid an appropriate hourly wage for that work without tip income.
    Yeah, I was aware that this is the situation for servers in the US but asked because I was unsure about whether it's the same for other people. My only other experience with tipping being that centrally integrated into the system for certain jobs (but not others) is from traveling in Chile, where e.g. the people bagging your groceries get nothing except tips, which I did not realize at first since they wear the same uniform as the cashiers, who actually get paid.

    Quote Originally Posted by AKPogue View Post
    I used to patrol at Skiland, it is a cool little place. If you haven't yet, hit up Moose Mt just to check it out the bus served skiing. There is so much to do in AK, I only found time to do just a little bit.

    There are some clubs to get involved with to meet people. Try http://www.alaskaalpineclub.com/ and get on their email list. They have a lot of different events and you can meet people that way to get out with. They have a mountaineering class in the spring and are always looking for people to help lead trips and it's also another good way to meet like minded people. There are also https://www.fairbankscycleclub.org/ and https://www.nscfairbanks.org/ The cross country skiing during the winter is great there. The cross country ski club has a swap meet in the fall so you can get some cheap gear if you don't have any cross country ski gear.

    I spent 5 years in Fairbanks and 1 summer just sucked for fires. It got so bad in town you could only see about 400 meters and there was a concern the fire was going to make it to Fairbanks. Luckily it didn't.

    Another cool event in AK is the Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic that is going to be held in beginning of August.
    Thanks for the Fairbanks advice. I have signed up for the cycling club and go on their weekly mountain bike rides and am on the climbing club listserv but haven't managed to go on one of their trips (they stopped skiing in April I think). Will try to volunteer with the alpine ski club in the winter. I bought my first ever pair of xc skis three days after I got there and it is a good way to get outside in the winter. Going for an xc ski over lunch just isn't quite as good as going for an actual ski, which I was able to do at home. Fairbanks isn't as terrible as people make it sound, I just have high standards in terms of skiing because of what I had at home.

    Were you there for the 2015 fire season or 2004? It sounds like both were really bad by objective metrics as well as subjective "I need to get out of fairbanks" feelings. Are you still in AK?
    Ich bitte dich nur, weck mich nicht.

  19. #44
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    Always interesting reading threads like this, because we all have our own tipping protocols but normally no way to know whether other people do the same. Here is mine, another data point. Obviously, these can get adjusted up or down depending on how I feel and how the service was.

    Restaurant servers: usually 20% (just easy math)
    Food delivery driver: $2-4 depending on size of order
    Takeout: $0-2
    Cabbies: $2-5 depending on length of trip
    Barbers: $3-4
    Car Valet: I suppose I'd tip a few bucks, but can't recall the last time I used one
    Airport Valet: $1/bag
    Other large delivery (furniture, appliances, etc): $0 to $10/per person, depending on how hard they worked and how conscientious they were

    Rarely have I tipped the hotel staff. In other places where there's a tip jar, sometimes throw my change in.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
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  20. #45
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    Do you guys tip a meal on the pre tax amount or post tax amount?

    I tip on the service and the food usually. So I do 20% of the pretax amount.

    Something just inherently wrong in my mind about tipping on tax I guess. My wife thinks I'm a cheap ass. Jokes on her because I am.


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  21. #46
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    I'm almost exactly the same Danno, but tip the bellmen at hotels 5 bucks a bag. Its pretty rare that I stay at swanky places like that though. Everything else at a hotel though, even after working at them, shouldn't get tipped IMO.

    I also always round up to the nearest whole number on the bill on top of it. So like if the bill+tip is going to be 19.50, I'm upping the tip to make it an even 20 bucks. I'm OCD about nothing but apparently that as I actually stayed up late once because it was gnawing at me that I didn't.
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  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    Do you guys tip a meal on the pre tax amount or post tax amount?

    I tip on the service and the food usually. So I do 20% of the pretax amount.

    Something just inherently wrong in my mind about tipping on tax I guess. My wife thinks I'm a cheap ass. Jokes on her because I am.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    If I were the judge I'd say thats pretty cheap of you to do so. Even a 200 dollar bill you are talking about what, 4 extra bucks by tipping on the tax.
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  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK47bp View Post
    Do you guys tip a meal on the pre tax amount or post tax amount?

    I tip on the service and the food usually. So I do 20% of the pretax amount.

    Something just inherently wrong in my mind about tipping on tax I guess. My wife thinks I'm a cheap ass. Jokes on her because I am.
    Absolutely, the conventional approach is you don't tip on tax. Me? I like my math to be easy. So, while I take into account the fact that the bill total includes tax, I usually just use the bill total. But if my 20% tip (on the taxed amount) takes me to slightly above a round number, I round down. I also try to remember that the differences we're talking about here are almost always very small, so why not give a slightly bigger tip and make the server happy? I mean, say the total bill is $108 ($100 + 8% tax). Technically, a 20% tip is $20 (tipping only on the bill, not the tax). Tipping 20% on the tax too only adds $1.60, hardly worth worrying about.

    So, some examples of how I make my math easy: bill with tax equals $19.85, I'll tip $4 (20% of $20). If the bill is $15.60, I'll tip $3 (20% of $15).
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
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  24. #49
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    Move the decimal point one place to the left and double that amount.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdironRider View Post
    I'm almost exactly the same Danno, but tip the bellmen at hotels 5 bucks a bag. Its pretty rare that I stay at swanky places like that though..
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

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