Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 51 to 66 of 66
  1. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    8,674
    Quote Originally Posted by splat View Post
    Yeah, I think it was that bro attitude that caused a boarder to climb out of a chopper in Valdez and hoist his board into the blades of a chopper. I wouldn't want to ride with an idiot looking to get after it so hard he could kill a pilot and himself, as well as others, due to his 'get after bro' stupidity. That's some serious flatlander bullshit, DD.
    when we were flying out of Cordova, at the lodge we waited outside the LZ while the guide hauled and loaded our skis and packs--they didn't trust us to not stick something in the rotors. On the glaciers, we huddled in the LZ while the heli landed (almost) on top of us. The guide kept reminding us to keep looking at the helicopter, which is hard to do when it's blasting snow in your face as it lands.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Spokane/Schweitzer
    Posts
    4,809
    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    when we were flying out of Cordova, at the lodge we waited outside the LZ while the guide hauled and loaded our skis and packs--they didn't trust us to not stick something in the rotors. On the glaciers, we huddled in the LZ while the heli landed (almost) on top of us. The guide kept reminding us to keep looking at the helicopter, which is hard to do when it's blasting snow in your face as it lands.
    That's standard. When the heli is landing, the best place to be is in the 'heli-huddle' as the pilot can see you and the rotor wash is the least. Keep your eye on the heli and be ready to get out of the way in case he might land on you (wind-shift). When you walk toward the heli outside the rotor ring with your skis, drag by the tips with nothing above waist-high. Walk around the front and don't touch the pitot tubes. Never go behind the cabin toward the rear rotor, etc. Lots of things that can go wrong around a helicopter.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    8,674
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldMember View Post
    That's standard. When the heli is landing, the best place to be is in the 'heli-huddle' as the pilot can see you and the rotor wash is the least. Keep your eye on the heli and be ready to get out of the way in case he might land on you (wind-shift). When you walk toward the heli outside the rotor ring with your skis, drag by the tips with nothing above waist-high. Walk around the front and don't touch the pitot tubes. Never go behind the cabin toward the rear rotor, etc. Lots of things that can go wrong around a helicopter.
    When I was a kid we went to DC. At the time the Smithsonian complex included the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, which had a museum. The museum had stuff like pieces of Lincoln's skull and Booth's bullet, legs amputated in the Civil War (one officer used to come to the museum to visit his leg), double headed babies in formalin, all the cool stuff. The highlight for me was the special exhibit they were running about helicopter rotor injuries, with lots of gory photographs. (The visit was memorable for my dad too; as we walked in he saw the name of his WWII commanding officer on the directory and got to visit with him.)

    For me the hardest part of heliskiing was trying to get my seat belt buckled quickly with 4 big, heavily dressed guys crammed into the back seat of an A Star.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    37ft above the hood
    Posts
    16,311
    Quote Originally Posted by splat View Post
    Yeah, I think it was that bro attitude that caused a boarder to climb out of a chopper in Valdez and hoist his board into the blades of a chopper. I wouldn't want to ride with an idiot looking to get after it so hard he could kill a pilot and himself, as well as others, due to his 'get after it bro' stupidity. That's some serious flatlander bullshit, DD.

    edit: shit, Jake, hadn't heard that.....
    i flew a chopper in Nam budddd

    i think i know a thing or two
    Zone Controller

    "He wants to be a pro, bro, not some schmuck." - Hugh Conway

    "DigitalDeath would kick my ass. He has the reach of a polar bear." - Crass3000

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Spokane/Schweitzer
    Posts
    4,809
    Quote Originally Posted by digitaldeath View Post
    i flew a chopper in Nam budddd

    i think i know a thing or two
    So, that makes you about 70 years old? With the mentality of a 14 year old so, you've got that going for you.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    15,718
    I have a local aquaintence who back in the day used to guide out of Canmore, lost an arm I believe when the chopper turned over, seems to do fine with a hook
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by digitaldeath View Post
    i flew a chopper in Nam budddd

    i think i know a thing or two
    Did you know Chet S? He gave quite the show around Valdez. Loved to fly folks downhill, and was quite handy with a firearm.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    37ft above the hood
    Posts
    16,311
    Quote Originally Posted by dewam View Post
    Did you know Chet S? He gave quite the show around Valdez. Loved to fly folks downhill, and was quite handy with a firearm.
    I knew Charlie and even he couldnít kill me
    Zone Controller

    "He wants to be a pro, bro, not some schmuck." - Hugh Conway

    "DigitalDeath would kick my ass. He has the reach of a polar bear." - Crass3000

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Calgary/Golden
    Posts
    5,374
    Yeah, I was always told to stop uphill from the guide when cat or heli skiing.

    And the second rule heli skiing, was never pick your skis up off the ground. Always drag them behind you. If you do, you buy beer. And they pay attention, because I bought beer.

    As for the skis, I always bring my own. I tell anyone that has their own fat skis to take what they're comfortable on. I've seen intermediate skiers waste a few runs trying to figure out a different pair of skis.
    It doesn't matter if you're a king or a little street sweeper...
    ...sooner or later you'll dance with the reaper
    -Death

    Kaz is my co-pilot

    www.highwaytechnical.com

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SF & the Ho
    Posts
    4,494

    Helicopter Skiing 101

    It's been 15yrs already - ugh - but VHSG rule back then was to stop above the guides. No ifs, ands, or buts. It was pretty obvious why. I doubt they have changed it

    Just recollecting on the one guy I met up there on Sugar Daddys. At 100mm they were by far the widest ski being used on that trip. They seemed sooo fat at the time lol
    Last edited by mcski; 05-17-2018 at 06:27 PM.

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,722
    I decided not to discuss exact operational procedures since some operations have different ways of doing things. But, each operation has its own safety briefing before flying/skiing were clients are informed about things like stopping behind the guide, how many turns apart, etc.
    "True love is much easier to find with a helicopter"

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    the junkshow
    Posts
    6,854
    Our first time (in AK anyway), right after the safety briefing where they explicitly told us not to go under the rotor disc without a guide, we went straight outside and took photos right next to the heli...under the rotor disc. Ugh. Guide was pissed and we learnt a lesson. Took a few runs to get back in his good graces. A good rule of thumb is to listen to the guide, because if he/she doesn't think you are a good listener, he/she will be less apt to trust you in the terrain.

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Before
    Posts
    17,988
    Quote Originally Posted by shredgnar View Post
    A good rule of thumb is to listen to the guide, because if he/she doesn't think you are a good listener, he/she will be less apt to trust you in the terrain.
    bingo
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
    >>>200 cm Black Bamboo Sidewalled DPS Lotus 120 : Best Skis Ever <<<

  14. #64
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SF & the Ho
    Posts
    4,494

    Helicopter Skiing 101

    And all guides are not created equal. They all have their own strengths and weaknesses. Their perception that you are listening is what counts
    Last edited by mcski; 05-19-2018 at 08:06 PM.

  15. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Spokane/Schweitzer
    Posts
    4,809
    Quote Originally Posted by Buster Highmen View Post
    bingo
    I echo what shredgnar and Buster said.

  16. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    8,674
    When we were skiing Cordova this year we were skiing one at a time, except when we got to the very low angle. good thing as I got partially buried--head and one forearm out. fortunately my son was still above me, because the guide was way down the hill and if I had to count on the other 2 guys in the group I'd still be buried.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •