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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    PNW
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    395
    Quote Originally Posted by OldSteve View Post
    In your case it didn't but that's anecdotal n=1 sample size. Al pitting is a case by case thing. It can happen early, late or never. Sometimes it can be sanded out, sometimes not. I've never tried the bead sealant, although I've run into people who say it sometimes works when sanding or brushing is not enough, so long as sealant is given time to cure a few hours in a warm dry place before mounting tire.

    Another fix is to put a tube in the tire. I drove a car for a few years with tubes in two of the tires.
    I've dealt with a lot of aluminum wheels over the years as my dad runs a body shop specializing in Subaru rebuilds. I can't remember ever running across AL wheels with severe corrosion. Still anecdotal, sure, but way more than a sample size of 1. I have never heard of an 8 year shelf life AL wheel. Sounds crazy.

    I bet you could seal a slow leaker with a tubeless sealant for bikes. Not sure how much you'd need, but the homemade cocktails are pretty cheap. Might be worth a shot.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Washoe Valley
    Posts
    280
    I had the same problem with my 2008 Honda Element with a slow leaking tire. The wheel rim bead had corrosion and they took some emery cloth to it and the problem went away. They said that they see this all the time and usually can be fixed with cleaning it up.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
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    13,315
    Quote Originally Posted by mtskibum16 View Post
    I can't remember ever running across AL wheels with severe corrosion.
    Most bead leaks happen where there is no apparent "severe corrosion." Cast Al alloy rims sometimes have porous spots where there is no sign of corrosion.

    Again, I'm surprised that people are surprised by slow leaks with cast Al rims, which IME is commonplace. I just did a quick Google search >aluminum rim slow leak<. This from the top results page 1 (of >500,000+ results) which is pregnant with the suggestion that it happens with relatively new rims:

    Q: One tire on my Yukon has a slow leak. Or so I thought, until I just replaced the tire because I got tired of filling it every week. Now the new tire leaks. * * *

    A: Did either of you two think that maybe the tire isn't leaking? Most cars have alloy rims nowadays. And unlike steel rims, a fair number of these wheels leak air. It's not a bead-seat surface leak, where air can creep out between the rim and rubber, but a leak through porosities in the cast-aluminum alloy. GM has a published repair procedure for this problem: Inflate the tire to 40 psi or so, and immerse the whole thing in a conventional dunk tank. Mark the rim with a grease pencil where the bubbles form. Then pull the rim out of the water, and demount the tire from the rim. Scuff lightly with 80-grit sandpaper. Dry off and clean the area corresponding to the leak on the inside of the rim with carb cleaner or mineral spirits, and cover it with a thin layer of silicone gasket sealer. (Don't use silicone tub caulk, which outgases acetic acid as it cures; it will corrode the metal wheel and may damage any tire-pressure monitoring-system sender.) Allow it to cure a few hours, then remount and rebalance the tire.

    That's GM's take. Other manufacturers have different policies as to what the warranty will do about faulty, leaky rims. I chatted with Matt Edmonds, vice president of Tire Rack, which sells a huge number of tires and alloy wheels. "If we find a wheel that's porous and leaking, we just replace it, not repair it." I'm siding with Matt. Any wheel that has a porous spot large enough to leak air obviously isn't as strong as one that's properly cast. I've had wheels fail structurally at speed, and it's pretty scary.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    PNW
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by OldSteve View Post
    Most bead leaks happen where there is no apparent "severe corrosion." Cast Al alloy rims sometimes have porous spots where there is no sign of corrosion.

    Again, I'm surprised that people are surprised by slow leaks with cast Al rims, which IME is commonplace.
    Yeah well that's fair. Most slow leaks that I touch up every few weeks don't have me thinking about buying new wheels. Anyways, curious how many people have tried sealant for tubeless setups on bikes. Seems like it could help with bead and porosity issues.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    1

    on the same subject....

    Should I buy a set of 4 used 18" rims for 200$?
    The owners claims that the rims have only a few scratches but they are 10-15 years old (based on the pattern)

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Simi Valley, CA
    Posts
    5,678
    Must be a regional/road salt thing, never heard of this happening in arid Cali and I'm in the auto parts industry. Other than chromed aluminum (which corrode under the chrome layer and eventually leak), wheels last forever here unless you hit something.

    Craigslist is the way to go.

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    108
    Semi-related, anybody using a second set of wheels for snow tires on a car with TPMS and if so, is it a pain in the ass? Thinking about just getting a cheap set of steel wheels rather than dealing with swapping tires in fall and spring. However, a bit concerned about TPMS. I wouldn't bother reprogramming but a bit worried about the shop forcing me to let them do it if I need to take one of the vehicles in for some other reason since TPMS is legally required.

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    7,929
    I put a piece of tape over the TPMS light on the dash.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    16,685
    Quote Originally Posted by bizarrefaith View Post
    Semi-related, anybody using a second set of wheels for snow tires on a car with TPMS and if so, is it a pain in the ass? Thinking about just getting a cheap set of steel wheels rather than dealing with swapping tires in fall and spring. However, a bit concerned about TPMS. I wouldn't bother reprogramming but a bit worried about the shop forcing me to let them do it if I need to take one of the vehicles in for some other reason since TPMS is legally required.
    My winter tire set doesn't have TPMS sensors. I just ignore the light.

    If you're worried about whether the tire shop will mount tires without TPMS sensors, just drop off the wheels separately to get the tires installed. That worked for me.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    833

    how much should a decent set of rims cost?

    Iíve done it both ways - ignored the light for years but recently Iíve had good luck buying tpms sensors for about $40 a set off ebay/amazon etc. Discount Tire happy to install with new tires. Depending on your vehicle it may not require any programming - just drive and itíll pick up new sensors.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    20,107
    TPMS is not required up here so i just ignore the light, extra steel rims are a smart idea, they pay for them selves in <3 yrs

    New steel rims usualy cost just < 100$ each IME

    i swapped the tires yesturday ... I hate that job
    Last edited by XXX-er; 05-11-2020 at 10:56 AM.
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  12. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    50 miles E of Paradise
    Posts
    9,287
    Quote Originally Posted by bizarrefaith View Post
    Semi-related, anybody using a second set of wheels for snow tires on a car with TPMS and if so, is it a pain in the ass? Thinking about just getting a cheap set of steel wheels rather than dealing with swapping tires in fall and spring. However, a bit concerned about TPMS. I wouldn't bother reprogramming but a bit worried about the shop forcing me to let them do it if I need to take one of the vehicles in for some other reason since TPMS is legally required.
    I had to install TPMS valves on the steel wheels I got for the dedicated snows on the Outback. Other than the initial cost, it’s no big deal. Tire Factory swaps the snows/all seasons in late fall & spring for free, including reprogramming of the TPMS.
    Check Out Ullr's Mobile Avalanche Safety Tools for iOS and Android
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  13. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Access to Granlibakken
    Posts
    7,693
    You didn’t mention what car you have. Keep in mind that many newer cars, like my 2017 Alltrack, have a ‘TPMS’ system that doesn’t rely on a valve TPMS assembly. Zero cost for your extra rims.

    On my 2015 Ford I have a 5 wheel set of snow tires. The OEM tpms assembly was around $16 each on Amazon. Tire shop wanted to charge $65 each. Fuck those guys.

  14. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    5,655

    how much should a decent set of rims cost?

    Alltrack designers FTW. Saves $250 on TPMS for winters. Iím going Velox Steriling with Hakkapelita for this winter

    Rims look good and are $500


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    I need to go to Utah.
    Utah?
    Yeah, Utah. It's wedged in between Wyoming and Nevada. You've seen pictures of it, right?

    So after 15 years we finally made it to Utah.....


    Thanks BCSAR and POWMOW Ski Patrol for rescues

    8, 17, 13, 18, 16, 18, 20, 19, 16

    2018/2019 (24/32)

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Eastern WA
    Posts
    392

    how much should a decent set of rims cost?

    Quote Originally Posted by whyturn View Post
    Alltrack designers FTW. Saves $250 on TPMS for winters. Iím going Velox Steriling with Hakkapelita for this winter

    Rims look good and are $500
    Sounds familiar! Just finished our third season with Velox Nirvana/Hakas on the Allroad. I get sad when swapping the summer wheels back on - this thing makes winter driving fun! I love that audi/vw use onboard TP monitoring. Unlike my Tundra, which eats about 2 TPMS sensors per year

  16. #41
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,564
    Bypass TPMS sensors by leaving the sensors in a pressurized vessel. DIY one with PVC pipe, end caps and a valve stem.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    4
    I have a Subaru with a set of winter tires/wheels mounted with valve TPMS sensors. IIRC, sensors were around $30 each, and the tire shop cloned the IDs from the ones that came with the car, meaning both sets of sensors have the same ID #s. The cloning takes the same amount of time as the reprogramming up front, so they didn't charge extra for it, but some of the ppl working in the shop didn't know you could clone the #, so YMMV. Doing it this way means you don't need to reprogram the TPMS on the car each time you swap wheels, so it's a simple and fast process whether you change them yourself moving forward or have the shop do it.

  18. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    ECO
    Posts
    4,611
    Quote Originally Posted by whyturn View Post
    Alltrack designers FTW. Saves $250 on TPMS for winters. I’m going Velox Steriling with Hakkapelita for this winter

    Rims look good and are $500


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Looking to get some rims for my winter Hakas. Eff the noise with the damn tire swaps and always seems to be some kinda of issue. You’re a tire shop, this shouldn’t be so difficult. I can do it myself and they’ll pay for themselves in swaps and frustration.

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