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  1. #1
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    Question Dolomites Recommendations?

    A friend and I are headed to the Dolomites for a kinda last minute trip starting on Sunday.

    Will be staying in Vigo di Fassa for a week, but will have an AWD car with snow tires and will be able to go anywhere in the region. We'll also have our touring gear with us.

    I'm excited about the trip but admittedly haven't spent nearly enough time researching places to go, things to do, etc. Would love some recommendations for must see and must ski locations nearby.

    Thanks, mags!

  2. #2
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    I would purchase these:
    http://www.versantesud.it/en/shop/fr...dolomites-2ed/ (there may be a 3rd edition)
    http://www.versantesud.it/en/shop/sk...-in-dolomites/

    The author guides out of Corvara which is on the northeast corner of the Sella massif. You can access a lot of terrain with the lifts out of Passo Pordoi (6 o'clock on the Sella) and then take the lifts or a bus/taxi back.
    If you factor in jetlag, a week isn't a long time, so you might consider hiring a guide for a day.

    I have lots of recommendations for restaurants in Alta Badia/Corvara, but have never been to Vigo di Fassa. That's not an impressive offer, though, as you will struggle to find a bad meal. DM me if you want any beta on the northern side of the Sella. Otherwise, well done, looks like they're getting more snow this week. Twenty minutes outside of Canazei is a legit basecamp, imho.

  3. #3
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    Just got back from there, in fact still sitting in JFK waiting to get home. Buy the book above, better yet find a guide with local Intel. It hasn't snowed in a while so conditions can be complete shit to epic. With a guide you can avoid the shit. The place is fucking massive with too many aspects to try to understand or desribe here. I got some epic lines with first or second tracks, rappeled into some lines and generally had a fantastic time.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post
    Just got back from there, in fact still sitting in JFK waiting to get home. Buy the book above, better yet find a guide with local Intel. It hasn't snowed in a while so conditions can be complete shit to epic. With a guide you can avoid the shit. The place is fucking massive with too many aspects to try to understand or desribe here. I got some epic lines with first or second tracks, rappeled into some lines and generally had a fantastic time.
    Where did you stay? And will you post trip reports?

  5. #5
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    Stayed in Arabba. More info to follow, but about to talk off. Conditions are still good if you know where to go, but shit in the wrong aspect. Of course popular lines have been skied a lot, but still hold good snow, just not Untracked powder. If local knowledge lots of Untracked or minimally tracked runs can still be had. Be careful following tracks, many can lead you into serious trouble.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post
    Stayed in Arabba. More info to follow, but about to talk off. Conditions are still good if you know where to go, but shit in the wrong aspect. Of course popular lines have been skied a lot, but still hold good snow, just not Untracked powder. If local knowledge lots of Untracked or minimally tracked runs can still be had. Be careful following tracks, many can lead you into serious trouble.
    Safe travels.

  7. #7
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    The Dolomites are just about my favorite place to ski. You're not staying too far from Sella Ronda access points like Canazei. Canazei links pretty easily to the Pordoi tram, putting you up onto the Sella massif, where many of the most famous lines and couloirs in the area are situated. Definitely hire a guide though - some of the most obvious couloirs require harness/rappels. A clear, windless powder day on Marmolada is special. Also, Cortina has amazing skiing, though itís a bit of a haul from where youíll be staying. The Staunies chair has closed since I was last there (potentially a good thing, depending on how you look at it), but that lift used to drop you right onto to some insane terrain off the back. Now it you have to earn your way up to the top of the old lift. Lagazuoi and Tofana also hold some great terrain. Town of Cortina itself is a trip.
    I've only stayed in Arabba and Alta Badia, so can't comment on dinng in Val di Fassa, but had one of my most memorable meals ever in Corvara, at a place called Stua de Michil.
    Last edited by Thatcher; 02-12-2018 at 04:48 PM.

  8. #8
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    Drool.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post
    Stayed in Arabba. More info to follow, but about to talk off. Conditions are still good if you know where to go, but shit in the wrong aspect. Of course popular lines have been skied a lot, but still hold good snow, just not Untracked powder. If local knowledge lots of Untracked or minimally tracked runs can still be had. Be careful following tracks, many can lead you into serious trouble.
    Hotel and food, please.

    Let's do some livin'
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thatcher View Post
    Also, Cortina has amazing skiing, though it’s a bit of a haul from where you’ll be staying.
    I clock four hours round trip from Vigo di Fassa. Coin flip if it's worth that commitment. Will be interesting to hear Hutash's take. From IG, it appears so many couloirs on the Sella are in now, you'd be hard pressed to tick them all in a week. Staying 20 minutes south of Passo Pordoi, it would be hard to leave the Sella or Marmolada. Spoiled for choice.

  11. #11
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    If you are skiing back to Vigo di Fassa on the Buffaure piste (main route to the valley on that side), stop at the Soldanella. Excellent home made everything. But as noted above, it's hard to miss when it comes to food in the Dolomites.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thatcher View Post
    The Dolomites are just about my favorite place to ski. You're not staying too far from Sella Ronda access points like Canazei. Canazei links pretty easily to the Pordoi tram, putting you up onto the Sella massif, where many of the most famous lines and couloirs in the area are situated. Definitely hire a guide though - some of the most obvious couloirs require harness/rappels. A clear, windless powder day on Marmolada is special. Also, Cortina has amazing skiing, though itís a bit of a haul from where youíll be staying. The Staunies chair has closed since I was last there (potentially a good thing, depending on how you look at it), but that lift used to drop you right onto to some insane terrain off the back. Now it you have to earn your way up to the top of the old lift. Lagazuoi and Tofana also hold some great terrain. Town of Cortina itself is a trip.
    I've only stayed in Arabba and Alta Badia, so can't comment on dinng in Val di Fassa, but had one of my most memorable meals ever in Corvara, at a place called Stua de Michil.
    Second the Marmolada and a guide...havenít been there in 15 years though, so have no reliable/up to date info for you...

  13. #13
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    Dolomites Recommendations?

    Delete dupe- tapatalk issue

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benny Profane View Post
    Hotel and food, please.
    Hotel Genziana, nothing special, but 100m walk to the tram. Breakfast was typical Euro fare, didn't eat dinner there because the menu passed out a breakfast looked pretty limited. The pastries in the adjacent building are said to be excellent, that coming from a local from Cortina. Two meals at Pizzeria 7 Sass di Roilo Renato. One night pizza one night pasta, both excellent, and some really nice wines for next to nothing compared to US prices. We drank apres ski at Bar Heidi, which is more if a wine bar and nice and quiet. Beer in Italy is generally pretty bland but wine choice is stellar.

    We ate at a bunch of random places around the mountain during the day, and I couldn't even begin to tell you were they were. All were excellent, another reason to ski with a good guide.
    Last edited by hutash; 02-15-2018 at 11:59 AM.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post
    We are at a bunch of random places around the mountain during the day, and I couldn't even begin to tell you were they were. All were excellent, another reason to ski with a good guide.
    What did you ski?

  16. #16
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    We started rhe first day in Val Gardena and skied various piste and off piste powder to Sass Pordoi. Skied and skinned to the Val de Mess I, the Vallea Blanche of the Dolomites. Snow was chalky buy food, but we'll skied out since it is a tourist run.

    Day two we started with a few random.runs to get to the Sass Pordoi again but this time dropped into Canale Col Alton. It was Untracked on the approach, but another group got it before us. Still plenty of Untracked. Steepest narrowest couloir I have ever done and was pretty fun.

    Some more random runs after lunch and finished off the Porto Vesco tram and a short skin from the gondola moderation to a massive Untracked bowl and glades all the way back to Arabba.

    Day three started from the Porto Vescoe tram then a short boot followed by Ridgeland ski and side step to Forfesc and 750m of Untracked goodness. The next run was not in the book and probably the best run of the trip. It involved a couple of chairs, and boot pack, moderately long skin, 70m rappel, then a massive bowl with only a couple sets of tracks friends put in the day before. Finished the day with the same skin out, but stayed skiers right of our previous line and had another 700m of Untracked perfect fall line powder skiing. We ended up a bit South of Arabba so had to thumb it back. The last day Francis, (the guide) wasnt feeling well so we called it a day so he could get hime and recuperate. I skied out to the Marmolada and had a fun nearly 2,000m run back to the bottom before I drove back to Zurich.for my flight home.

    Unfortunately this fucking website won't load pictures upright, so I am not including any upside down or sideways shots

    Prior to this portion of the trip I was in St Anton am Arlberg for three days of mostly on piste skiing with my Austrian exchange school daughter who lived with us about eight years ago.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  17. #17
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    The named runs are all in the guide book mentioned. Others may be, but I don't k ow the names. The rappeled run I do not believe is in the book, but the locals k ow it and have set up bolted rappel anchors.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post
    We started rhe first day in Val Gardena and skied various piste and off piste powder to Sass Pordoi. Skied and skinned to the Val de Mess I, the Vallea Blanche of the Dolomites. Snow was chalky buy food, but we'll skied out since it is a tourist run.

    Day two we started with a few random.runs to get to the Sass Pordoi again but this time dropped into Canale Col Alton. It was Untracked on the approach, but another group got it before us. Still plenty of Untracked. Steepest narrowest couloir I have ever done and was pretty fun.

    Some more random runs after lunch and finished off the Porto Vesco tram and a short skin from the gondola moderation to a massive Untracked bowl and glades all the way back to Arabba.

    Day three started from the Porto Vescoe tram then a short boot followed by Ridgeland ski and side step to Forfesc and 750m of Untracked goodness. The next run was not in the book and probably the best run of the trip. It involved a couple of chairs, and boot pack, moderately long skin, 70m rappel, then a massive bowl with only a couple sets of tracks friends put in the day before. Finished the day with the same skin out, but stayed skiers right of our previous line and had another 700m of Untracked perfect fall line powder skiing. We ended up a bit South of Arabba so had to thumb it back. The last day Francis, (the guide) wasnt feeling well so we called it a day so he could get hime and recuperate. I skied out to the Marmolada and had a fun nearly 2,000m run back to the bottom before I drove back to Zurich.for my flight home.
    You ticked off Col Alton on day two; well done.
    I have already spoken to a guide, but am wondering if it's worth the money for the Val Mesdi. Are the entrance and exit straightforward enough to tackle without a guide? I was hoping to save the guided day for Val Scura or Col Alton or other couloirs harder to find or exit.
    What did you bring for gear? Debating bringing a rock harness or light skimo harness. Not sure I'll do the 70m rap, but seems like there are longer rappels than just navigating a 10 m ice bulge. I am also hoping to leave the ski crampons at home but am worried about spring ice.
    Congrats on your trip. Sounds great for such a short time.

  19. #19
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    Mesdi is pretty straight forward and I would think it could be done without a guide. The entrance is pretty obvious and after that it is pretty much just down the couloir to town. I would definitely track down GPS coordinates. While it was obvious, mistakes there can lead to cliffs and long hikes out.

    Col Alton is actually much easier to find as you are staring at it the whole time of the approach.

    A light harness is a good idea if you want to ski certain lines, but not necessary since there are plenty of non technical options.

    Our last day was going to be La Galleria, which would involve a wrap after crawling through a world war two era gun cave. Kinda bummed we didn't get to do it.

    Definitely full winter conditions when I was there. No new snow in a week or two, yet we skied fresh tracks each day. Really good quality snow as well. While the Mesdi was cool, there are a lot better lines to ski.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  20. #20
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    Sella Group is the most beautiful place I have every skied and great alpine culture. It was only for 4 days and I was alone so stuck to well know runs that were lift access, mostly Sella Ronda, which I highly recommend. Stayed in Canazei and had great food but can't remember the names. Sella Ronda is more than enough for 3 days, Marmolada is a day but if clear the view is outstanding. If there a week, guides sound good just don't know.

    WHEN I go again, I would like to just park the car, pack a change in my backpack, and ski all day and find a place in whatever town I end up in.
    Education must be the answer, we've tried ignorance and it doesn't work!

  21. #21
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    Awesome. Thanks.

    Let's do some livin'
    After, we die

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rip'nStick View Post
    Sella Group is the most beautiful place I have every skied and great alpine culture. It was only for 4 days and I was alone so stuck to well know runs that were lift access, mostly Sella Ronda, which I highly recommend. Stayed in Canazei and had great food but can't remember the names. Sella Ronda is more than enough for 3 days, Marmolada is a day but if clear the view is outstanding. If there a week, guides sound good just don't know.

    WHEN I go again, I would like to just park the car, pack a change in my backpack, and ski all day and find a place in whatever town I end up in.
    Got to agree with all of this, the place is fucking amazing. Reminds me a lot of Zion but with epic skiing and food. I didn't do the Sella Ronda, figured I save it for a trip with my wife who like to cruise grommers. Hooking up with local knowledge, be it a guide of a local is a must. There is a life time of phenomenal runs to explore, most of which aren't in the books. Although just doing the book runs would take most people a life time.

    The climbing, cycling, hiking and eating in summer would be equally fantastic.

    While I love Chamonix and Arlberg, I have to admit with good snow The Dolomites are a better place.

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  23. #23
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    Agree with you on that. Here are photos from a few years back.

    Canale Joel:



    Canale Sass de Forcia:



    Holzer:









    Heading to Marmolada:



    It snowed a lot in the Dolomites that year.














  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by hutash View Post
    Got to agree with all of this, the place is fucking amazing. Reminds me a lot of Zion but with epic skiing and food. I didn't do the Sella Ronda, figured I save it for a trip with my wife who like to cruise grommers. Hooking up with local knowledge, be it a guide of a local is a must. There is a life time of phenomenal runs to explore, most of which aren't in the books. Although just doing the book runs would take most people a life time.

    The climbing, cycling, hiking and eating in summer would be equally fantastic.

    While I love Chamonix and Arlberg, I have to admit with good snow The Dolomites are a better place.
    Wow.

    There is a mountain biking event in, I think, June called the Hero. A supported 60ish mile ride around the Sella Ronde. Otherwise, there are many many miles of marked trails. Beautiful. The roads are a bit hairy, but I hear that drivers respect you.

    Let's do some livin'
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thatcher View Post
    Agree with you on that. Here are photos from a few years back.
    Canale Joel:
    Canale Sass de Forcia:
    Holzer:
    Wow. Joel, Sass da Forcia and the Holzer. That's a good trip. How rowdy was the Holzer?

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