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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    15,423
    Yeah, PNW will never be the same after Cascadia goes. Seattle and Portland will be a top-shelf dystopian hellscapes.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Near Perimetr.
    Posts
    3,858
    Been a geobuff all my life (at some point almost started studying geology..) so good reading here.

    Few years back went from Calgary to Fernie and saw the Frank slide. Was really mind boggling to see it live.
    One of the "does not compute" moments. Impressive.

    But, as always at TGR, stepping up a bit :

    The "potential" Canary Islands tsunami : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumbre_Vieja
    Over hyped, probably, but certainly would make a mess.

    Or back in the days when even Iceman was young : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanclean_flood (ok, that is not a landslide. but lot of shit happened.)

    The floggings will continue until morale improves.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    20,928
    Quote Originally Posted by Meathelmet View Post
    Or back in the days when even Iceman was young : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanclean_flood (ok, that is not a landslide. but lot of shit happened.)
    You wanna talk floods? This is why eastern Washington has such fertile soil for growing crops.



    Missoula Floods








    The Missoula Floods (also known as the Spokane Floods or the Bretz Floods) refer to the cataclysmic floods that swept periodically across eastern Washington and down the Columbia River Gorge at the end of the last ice age. The glacial flood events have been researched since the 1920s. These glacial lake outburst floods were the result of periodic sudden ruptures of the ice dam on the Clark Fork River that created Glacial Lake Missoula. After each ice dam rupture, the waters of the lake would rush down the Clark Fork and the Columbia River, flooding much of eastern Washington and the Willamette Valley in western Oregon. After the rupture, the ice would reform, creating Glacial Lake Missoula again.

    During the last deglaciation that followed the end of the Last Glacial Maximum, geologists estimate that a cycle of flooding and reformation of the lake lasted an average of 55 years and that the floods occurred several times over the 2,000-year period between 15,000 and 13,000 years ago. U.S. Geological Survey hydrologist Jim O'Connor and Spanish Center of Environmental Studies scientist Gerard Benito have found evidence of at least twenty-five massive floods, the largest discharging ≈10 cubic kilometers per hour (2.7 million m³/s, 13 times the Amazon River).[2] Alternate estimates for the peak flow rate of the largest flood include 17 cubic kilometers per hour[3] and range up to 60 cubic kilometers per hour.[4] The maximum flow speed approached 36 meters/second (130 km/h or 80 mph).[3]

    Within the Columbia Basin, detailed investigation of the Missoula floods' glaciofluvial deposits, informally known as the Hanford formation, has documented the presence of Middle and Early Pleistocene Missoula flood deposits within the Othello Channels, Columbia River Gorge, Channeled Scabland, Quincy Basin, Pasco Basin, and the Walla Walla Valley. Based on the presence of multiple interglacial calcretes interbedded with flood deposits, magnetostratigraphy, optically stimulated luminescence dating, and unconformity truncated clastic dikes, it has been estimated that the oldest of the Pleistocene Missoula floods happened before 1.5 million years ago. Because of the fragmentary nature of older glaciofluvial deposits, which have been largely removed by subsequent Missoula floods, within the Hanford formation, the exact number of older Missoula floods, which are known as Ancient Cataclysmic Floods, that occurred during the Pleistocene cannot be estimated with any confidence.[5][6]
    When you see something that is not right, not just, not fair, you have a moral obligation to say something. To do something." Rep. John Lewis


    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Posts
    14,027
    The phrase Channeled Scablands runs through my mind constantly whenever I've visited E. WA.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    19,860
    https://www.nbcnews.com/business/10-...ers-6c10088195

    when it comes to natural disasters, you can run but you can't hide. The one that I'm worried about is climate change.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Couloirfornia
    Posts
    8,852
    The Missoula jokulhaups/outflows definitely came to mind when it was read this thread yesterday. But didn't mention it because it isn't really a landslide.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    Quote Originally Posted by Ernest_Hemingway View Post
    I realize there is not much hope for a bullfighting forum. I understand that most of you would prefer to discuss the ingredients of jacket fabrics than the ingredients of a brave man. I know nothing of the former. But the latter is made of courage, and skill, and grace in the presence of the possibility of death. If someone could make a jacket of those three things it would no doubt be the most popular and prized item in all of your closets.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    6,744
    "It felt like a volcanic erection."



  8. #58
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE USA
    Posts
    3,409
    Quote Originally Posted by Meathelmet View Post
    when even Iceman was young :
    a geomanictic unpossiblity.
    "Can't you see..."

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