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  1. #1
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    gorrilla glue for binding screws is the way to go

    Or not? I think it's waterproof wood glue, which is what I thought you should use. Of course, I've used other glue in the past (and probably no glue at some point) and never had an issue, but I'm trying to do this correctly.
    [quote][//quote]

  2. #2
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    Dec 2014
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    West Systems G-flex 650 marine epoxy. There are a lot of threads on this, but I can't pull any up in search JONG or a standard Google search.

    If I recall, Gorilla Glue expands a bit and this can be problematic. The G Flex is ... flexible. Most folks use Titebond.

    The big test as far as water seepage is concerned is to see if your screws are rusty a few years later ... at which point, it might be too late (core rot and mildew).

    ... Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    pdx
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    7,665
    Titebond 3

  4. #4
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    Nov 2006
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    idaho panhandle!
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    4,071

  5. #5
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    Mar 2009
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    top layer of jelly from a can of spam. lubes the screws and is water tight

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Simi Valley, CA
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    Been using Gorilla Glue for binding screws for years, nice and waterproof yet the screws remove cleanly with a quick snap of the screwdriver. It expands a bit around the holes into voids in binding baseplates, but that's about it. (It only expands if exposed to water or moisture before it dries, so for gluing two boards together you're actually supposed to wet one side prior to clamping.)

    If it's a metal ski only that's used occasionally and bindings are pulled on and off, I use silicone RTV to keep water out.

    For installing inserts, definitely G/Flex.
    FS: NIB G3 Ion Crampons, all widths
    FS: 1/4" Toe Shims for G3 Ion, aluminum

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    I believe DPS specifys epoxy or Gorrila glue for their carbon skis

    GG is a ureathane glue so it is water seeking
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1000-oaks View Post
    Been using Gorilla Glue for binding screws for years, nice and waterproof yet the screws remove cleanly with a quick snap of the screwdriver. It expands a bit around the holes into voids in binding baseplates, but that's about it. (It only expands if exposed to water or moisture before it dries, so for gluing two boards together you're actually supposed to wet one side prior to clamping.)

    If it's a metal ski only that's used occasionally and bindings are pulled on and off, I use silicone RTV to keep water out.

    For installing inserts, definitely G/Flex.
    Well, there ya go ;-)

    For some reason, I recalled that Gorilla Glue's expansion was problematic even though that's counter-intuitive to me.

    ... Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Shuswap Highlands
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    1,497
    I always get confused. There's GG wood glue, & that amber GG. Which is which? The amber stuff expands and gets excited with H2O; the wood glue does not, both waterproof when cured I think? No idea on their respective differences in bond.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Western MT
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    216
    Quote Originally Posted by galibier_numero_un View Post
    Well, there ya go ;-)

    For some reason, I recalled that Gorilla Glue's expansion was problematic even though that's counter-intuitive to me.

    ... Thom
    I have read of Gorilla Glue (the original variety) creating bumps on the bottom of the ski base upon expansion, but no personal experience with that. I guess the key is to limit application amounts?

    I use 24 hour marine epoxy these days but have used Titebond III in the past with no ill effects. I have never used GG, but always fill the hole to the top with epoxy/Titebond.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    T-town, CO. USA
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    2,034
    Never use urethane glue for binding mounts. It requires using WATER to bond properly... and it expands, often causing problems by pushing materials in the core around.
    Use "Roo-glue" or a waterproof wood glue and call it good.
    Leave No Turn Unstoned!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    I would put that one under urban myth, I have used GG, you can spit in the holes and the glue will bubble up all yeller but it does not expand enough to bubble a base

    i had a big crack in my concrete foundation fixed with a ureathane glue and it was an awesume process to watch it seeking out the water
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Simi Valley, CA
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    I've had success with two drops of Gorilla Glue. Swirl he first drop into the tapped threads so it soaks into the wood, then add the second drop to the screw threads low on the screw just before installing. Go around the pattern tightening each screw a turn at a time so the air has time to escape.

    Bumps in the ski could actually be from hydraulic injection of too much high viscosity glue, or air forced into the core by driving in the screw too fast (that's sealed at the top by high viscosity glue).

    Thinner wood glues probably flow out the threads a lot more easily, so it doesn't hurt to drive the screws in quickly. Take your time with epoxy or GG.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    350
    Roo Glue is the stuff i will be using.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    164
    I have had good luck with glue specifically designed for mounting ski bindings. I have had good luck finding it from ski shop distributors like SVST.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    WA
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    I've used roo glue for years. No issues.

    Expoxy still recommended for carbon skis I think.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    27
    I wouldn't use GG for binding mounts. Plenty of folks have had good luck it seems, but after using it for many other things, it's too hard to estimate the amount of expanded goo created, and it would seem there's nowhere for it to go. Well, that and: I can't figure out any reason to use anything other than 24-hour epoxy (and that G Flex stuff sounds ideal, though the regular works perfectly too).

    However, GG has become my tool of choice to repair delams. My procedure: wet the interior of the delam and dab with a paper towel so it's just damp; apply GG, into the gap as much as possible; tightly clamp the crap out of the entire delam; next day, unclamp and sand off the extruded peanut brittle.

    It may sound dicey introducing water to the interior of the ski (and then sealing it in there). But the GG seems to consume the water, and the water seems to draw the GG deeply into the gap. I've never had a GG delam repair budge or fail in any way, while I've never been able to successfully repair a delam with epoxy (it's too hard to force the epoxy deeply into the gap - and if the gap is wide enough to do so, the ski is most likely fkd).

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Eburg
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    11,020
    I use long set epoxy (e.g., West Marine) for all ski mounts. I've tried other glues but always come back to long-set epoxy. Polyurethane glue is not waterproof, and is merely water resistant, less so than long set epoxy. PU glue also has lower peel and shear strength than epoxy. Titebond (II or III) is weaker yet, marketed as waterproof but it's not, as evinced by rusty screws.

  19. #19
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    Titebond II and GG wood glue are ANSI Type II water-resistance. Both manufacturers call this water resistant. Would rather not use
    Titebond III and GG original are ANSI Type I water-resistance. Both manufacturers call this waterproof and the test is pretty legit. I would trust this stuff and likely choose the wood glue over the GG.

    I have some Roo Glue but it's getting way past its shelf life. I have also used marine GOOP but its difficult to work with

  20. #20
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    Nov 2007
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    Eburg
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    Below is a pic of rusty binding screws, Titebond II used in mount. (Pic is from Zeno's now hard to find pullout test). I have seen similarly rusted screws in Titebond mounts.


  21. #21
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    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    any liquid could conceivably cause a probelm when forced into a hole because liquid doesnt compress at least when GG seeks out water it ends up being bubbles which is mostly air which compresses

    http://www.crackmasters.ca/Services/...ackRepair.aspx

    IME Polyurethane glue is great shit for permanently fixing a cracked foundation ^^^ all kinds of double entendre ... great name for a business eh?
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Simi Valley, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIYSteve View Post
    Below is a pic of rusty binding screws, Titebond II used in mount. (Pic is from Zeno's now hard to find pullout test). I have seen similarly rusted screws in Titebond mounts.
    Yep, haven't had a single rusty screw since I stopped using Titebond. Who cares how "waterproof" the glue is, if the glue itself is a source of water.

    GG only expands if water is present. If you put it in a ski with a dry core, it dries clear and slightly flexible (like G/Flex, but without the side effect of sticking to the screw threads and possibly tearing material out of your ski when removed), and does NOT expand. It'll only foam a bit under the baseplate where exposed to moisture in the air, which keeps water away from the hole and is fine.

    I'd rather have a glue that pulls any moisture out of the ski core and into the glue while setting. But clearly using a water-based wood glue is used by most shops with great success, though I suspect low cost and ease of use are the main reasons. It's cheap and good enough.
    Last edited by 1000-oaks; 11-06-2017 at 11:07 AM.
    FS: NIB G3 Ion Crampons, all widths
    FS: 1/4" Toe Shims for G3 Ion, aluminum

  23. #23
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    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    exactly ^^ what shop wants to use an expensive nasty 2 part epoxy which then requires 24 hrs to cure when wood glue is good enough

    I think I would suggest GG over wood glue but I normaly use slow set
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    146
    Pretty much everything's already been said - but one detail in the differences.

    Epoxy's holding strength is exceedingly high, even when it's used in large gaps.
    GG/PU and wood glue lose the vast majority of their strength when applied where even modest gaps are present.

    Thus, for some things, like delams, I think epoxy is a better choice. I'm sure you can get PU to work fine, but IMO epoxy's more appropriate, and there's a reason they use epoxy to build the ski in the first place.

    [I use shrink wrap with a little build with cardboard on the top of the ski (to add down-force) for top-sheet delams.]

    All that said, I always use epoxy - I've got it handy, I can mix tiny amounts easily, and I'm very happy with it. As for mounting, I'm sure PU works fine too, and if I forced to pick between PU and wood-glue, it would be PU. Much more waterproof. [I'd probably worry about it's expansion - though that may be misplaced.]

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Gaperville, CO
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    1,585
    Original GG is recommended by DPS for their skis. Just FYI.

    Not saying it's the best; just an approved option.

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