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  1. #76
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasatch
    Posts
    4,717
    Quote Originally Posted by Cant share a double View Post
    My wife and I will be suiting up our 20 month old this January for the first time. Any advice on first time out? Between the legs? Anyone here use a bungee leash or anything like that?
    Hate the leash and other similar mechanical restraining devices. Hula hoop might be helpful if yo do it right. Expect very little at less than 2 years old. Bring snacks.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    north aspect
    Posts
    32,520
    IMO,
    before there is enough muscle coordination, the leash doesn’t harm their ability to become a ‘ripper’. once they have the ability to balance, control and push the ski thru the snow, drop the leash. I found that the power snow plow let em control their speed but at times it was better for me to be the brakes. Obviously some of this depends on the hill they learn at. Skiing @Bachelor I could let them go independent more often than when we skied @Alpental.
    mine were motivated by skittles but ymmv
    bF
    Alpental Indigenous

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    3
    Nice, luckily I'm 6'4" so she should fit nicely under/between my legs. We will have plenty of snacks! Will definitely bring skittles...for me, maybe some for her. I like the hula hoop idea as well. We'll see how it goes.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    north aspect
    Posts
    32,520
    A harness with sturdy handle on the back
    helps with lifting, loading and hauling. IMO
    bF
    Alpental Indigenous

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    the Low Sierra
    Posts
    10,225
    Agreed. And the leash attached to it worked for us.

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Alpental
    Posts
    5,140
    Quote Originally Posted by Cant share a double View Post
    Nice, luckily I'm 6'4" so she should fit nicely under/between my legs. We will have plenty of snacks! Will definitely bring skittles...for me, maybe some for her. I like the hula hoop idea as well. We'll see how it goes.
    before you ever get on snow, do the following: put her in her skis and boots on carpet (grass outside works too) and get her to walk around with skis on her feet. Then get her to turn around 180 degrees- both to the left and to the right- use some sort of snack/reward etc that she can follow. If she can walk forward, and then turn around without stepping across her skis ie right across left when turning left, then you should be good to go. If she steps across her ski, her coordination isn't quite there yet for much other than riding with you doing all of the work.

    And it's been said, but little kids are really hard on the lower back and knees if you are the one doing all the work in the power wedge.
    Move upside and let the man go through...

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Peaking in Chads Window
    Posts
    530
    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    before you ever get on snow, do the following: put her in her skis and boots on carpet (grass outside works too) and get her to walk around with skis on her feet. Then get her to turn around 180 degrees- both to the left and to the right- use some sort of snack/reward etc that she can follow. If she can walk forward, and then turn around without stepping across her skis ie right across left when turning left, then you should be good to go. If she steps across her ski, her coordination isn't quite there yet for much other than riding with you doing all of the work.

    And it's been said, but little kids are really hard on the lower back and knees if you are the one doing all the work in the power wedge.
    I also found spending some time getting them comfortable with putting their own ski back on when they crash was really important. I saw quite a few parents doing all the work and SMH I wan them to be independant. The more he did it the less frustrating it became. Probably more of a no brainer I guess...

    Best part is he jumped on the couch with me to watch Bearings with me last night. kid is stoked!

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    6,776
    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Fiedler View Post
    I also found spending some time getting them comfortable with putting their own ski back on when they crash was really important. I saw quite a few parents doing all the work and SMH I wan them to be independant. The more he did it the less frustrating it became. Probably more of a no brainer I guess...

    Best part is he jumped on the couch with me to watch Bearings with me last night. kid is stoked!
    Better to just crank the bindings so they never come off. Kids bones bend, not break. (Usually).

    IMO the biggest problem in teaching kids to ski is too soon, too hard, too much. If they need the leash they're not ready. If they're in the back seat they're scared and the run is too steep for them. I've seen too many dads taking kids down runs that were obviously way too hard. It turns them off skiing, it makes them worse skiers, not better. I've seen dads screaming at their kids to hurry up on a powder day. Too much family drama in the parking lot. It's great for the kids to have fun in the snow at any age, but they don't need real ski gear or a lift ticket to do that. At most--cheap toy skis that strap onto snow boots. I'm not talking about waiting until puberty for real skiing--toilet trained should do it, like I said before. The hard part about teaching kids to ski is finding time to ski yourself, unless you have the money for ski school or ski day care.

    That said, plenty of people did the opposite of everything I said and the kids turned into great, passionate skiers.

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    171
    it should be about attitude and not age.get your kids outside in the cold right from the get go.i spent countless hours with my 2 now grown kids outside in the snow when they were just infants,pulling them on the sled and just playing in the snow.my son was just about 2 when i brought him out on skiis and my daughter around 20 months.both loved to be out in the cold and snow.by 3 they both were in a ski day care program that my mtn offered to locals and employees.by 6 they were in a race program that a local ski academy ran. no matter what you always have to make sure thatFUN IS THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECT of skiing. my son has been teaching skiing /coaching since he was 19 now 29, my daughter 28 coahed till she started a family. now 3 year old grandson and a 15 month old grand daughter.its time to start over again.i have coached and taught skiing for 10 years and differantly see the biggest problem with parents is pushing their kids on terrain that they aren't ready for.

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