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Thread: Bikepacking

  1. #76
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    Feb 2011
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    The Land of Subdued Excitement
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    I just wanted to know if it could

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldMember View Post
    This might be helpful, too. This is his equipment list of what he took on that trip. He rode for about 10 weeks when he did this trip.

    Tarptent Double Rainbow
    Tyvek footprint
    ZPack 850 fill 20 degree bag
    4 Cuben Fiber stuff sacks
    2 pair cycling shorts
    3 Mountain Hardware Wicked Lite shirts (2 long sleeve, 1 short sleeve)
    Garmont hiking shoes
    Fox Flux Helmet
    iPhone 5S
    Sony HDR AS100 action camera
    Monster isport earbuds
    Garmin Edge 500
    Bushnell Power Sync Solar Wrap Mini
    Stoic Vaporshell jacket and pants
    Jetboil sol w/small fuel canister
    Smartwool 150 base layer top and bottom
    Swiss Army knife
    Topeak Alien 2 bike tool
    Camelbak Hawg Pack w/3Liter bladder
    Rock N Roll Gold chain lube
    Thermarest Neoair Xlite sleeping pad
    Platypus 2 liter Gravity Works water filter
    MSR Dromedary 6 liter water bladder
    Camelbak 3 liter water bladder
    Surly tube (spare)
    Zpack Bear Bag
    Zpack toothbrush
    Snow peak Titanium Spork
    First aid kit
    Zip ties
    Duct tape
    Smart wool socks, 2 pair cycling anklets, 1 pair mid weight hikers
    Patagonia nano puff jacket
    Timberland convertible pants
    Petzl Tikka XP 2 headlamp
    Cocoon ultralight air core pillow
    Camps Suds
    Camp towel
    ACA mapset
    North Face Windstopper gloves
    Giro DND mt bikng gloves
    Gore Windstopper skull cap
    Baby wipes
    Outdoor Research water bottle parka
    Chamois butter
    Jack Black 45 SPF sun screen
    Tifosi Slip sun glasses
    Lezyne micro floor HV tire pump
    Spot Tracker Gen 3
    Funny I have some of that gear for backpacking.

    Also, he used platform pedals... I was thinking I might need to get over the terror of clipping in.

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Eburg
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    Quote Originally Posted by evdog View Post
    I wouldn't want panniers for most of the singletrack bikepacking I do. Too easy to get them hung up on rocks, trees or other obstacles.
    Okay, that makes sense

  4. #79
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    Mar 2007
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    Hyperspace!
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    964
    The relatively weak pannier connections can also be a breakdown point if traveling on rough singletrack/doubletrack - hence the utility of the soft "bikepacking" attachments

  5. #80
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    Nov 2007
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    Eburg
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    Not all pannier attachments are weak. I usually bolted mine on. My next rack/pannier project will have threaded connections.

  6. #81
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    Apr 2006
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    Spokane/Schweitzer
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtngirl79 View Post
    Funny I have some of that gear for backpacking.

    Also, he used platform pedals... I was thinking I might need to get over the terror of clipping in.
    Yeah, I don't think you'll want clip-ins for bikepacking. It's too easy to lose your balance at slower speeds with the extra weight plus you'll likely have walking sections so will want shoes or light boots with good traction. Pretty likely that whatever footwear you want won't be clip-in compatible.

  7. #82
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    Sep 2009
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    Oregon
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    482
    Here's my bikepacking ride:

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    Soma B side frame with a mix of parts on it (found used online). 27.5 wheels with clearance for 2.8 tires (I could probably squeeze a 3.0 in front). Currently, I've been riding more local trails so have a front susp fork on it that I would swap out for rigid on longer tours. Steel frame because 1) it's steel and 2) steel triangles can fit full frame bags unlike those low slung aluminum so-aero frames. Oh and get a Jones loop bar.

    In the future, I'd probably take the plunge on a full on fat bike. The 650b mid fat rigid marketing is alright but I want the extra cushion of a 4"+ tire if I'm rocking rigid.

    IMO the ultimate stable would be something like the above (or Surly KM/Krampus, Advocate hayduke, etc) that's in the 2.5-3" tire range and a front suspension fork, lighter, and somewhat snappy for bigger, more technical high mtn tours with a lot of steeper climbs/descents. Then a full on fat bike rigid for long bikepacking trips on gravel/dirt roads with drawn out climbs and mellower descents.

  8. #83
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    Sep 2009
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    Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldMember View Post
    Yeah, I don't think you'll want clip-ins for bikepacking. It's too easy to lose your balance at slower speeds with the extra weight plus you'll likely have walking sections so will want shoes or light boots with good traction. Pretty likely that whatever footwear you want won't be clip-in compatible.
    No way in hell would I ride clipless pedals with a bikepacking load.

  9. #84
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    Feb 2011
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    The Land of Subdued Excitement
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    What bike is it?

  10. #85
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Oakland, CA
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    Bikepacking

    Buddy is riding a sweet rig. Tumbleweed Prospector.

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    My posse and I are riding Haanjos for versatility

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    Mine is worthy of a quick review.

    Diamondback Haanjo Carbon EXP

    In original form, it was a Franken bike with stock parts and the DEORE, XT, Dura ace 3x9 with bar end shifting.

    Praise for this set up is allover the internet and the hype is real. The big issue being the rigidity of the bike on scree or shale as the compliance is not as smooth as a fatter tire bike. The bike also assumes you probably want panniers, which seems to be a declining method of packing.

    Current set up is a bit more purpose driven:
    SRAM drive train in 2x10 with Red shifters, xx front derailleur, xo spec 2 rear derailleur, Shimano XT cassette and crankset.
    Updated the bars to the KFC Thomson bars, FSA stem, and Thomson seat post for better bump compliance especially offroad. This set up is more cyclocross with the drive train supporting bikepacking in a lighter load. My trips are usually a lot shorter so saving a ton of weight and losing a few teeth of climbing power was a good trade off. I could have gone 1x and was ready to do so, but I didnt want to find a hill I had to hike a bike the last yards of with a full load. All in all, it is a really nice set up if you want to ride 27.5 at 2.1-2.2” wide. I have a set of 28” tubular that switch out quickly for bad weather road riding too!

    Here is a picture. We are looking at getting Tumbleweed Prospectors when my fiancé is out of school and we have time to do some longer international bikepacking.

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  11. #86
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Austin, TX
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    333
    Do you have any pics of it loaded down with bags? Also what kind of weight is that thing as setup? No mud issues with front clearance?

    That is a sweet sweet rig that could double duty on-road touring as well.

  12. #87
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    san diego
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    612
    Quote Originally Posted by mtngirl79 View Post
    Also, he used platform pedals... I was thinking I might need to get over the terror of clipping in.
    Plenty of people use platform pedals for regular riding and for bikepacking. Bikepacking is one place they make a lot of sense IMO, as you're likely to do more hike a bike on a loaded bike. Some clipless shoes are ok for hiking but a lot are not. Use what you're most comfortable with.

  13. #88
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcolingham View Post

    My posse and I are riding Haanjos for versatility
    Interdasting. Looks like somebody is riding an older Comp. Any idea if that has room for the big tires like yours?
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  14. #89
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    May 2008
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    Oakland, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Interdasting. Looks like somebody is riding an older Comp. Any idea if that has room for the big tires like yours?
    The other Haanjos appear to have clearance for bigger tires when you drop to 650b/27.5 instead of 700c. I have read that the forks on the comps and EXP are the same in carbon for carbon and alu for alu comparisons. I have rode the aluminum bike and it is nice and comfortable. When you hop on my EXP, it immediately feels like a very mature and well laid out ride.

    One thing to note, the front thru axel is 12x100. The market for these hubs is growing but when I bought this, it was slim pickings.

  15. #90
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    May 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by thejongiest View Post
    Do you have any pics of it loaded down with bags? Also what kind of weight is that thing as setup? No mud issues with front clearance?

    That is a sweet sweet rig that could double duty on-road touring as well.
    Nope for pics. Ill look to see what I have but we are on the road for a month and I dont have my computer. Sorry!

    Weight is not bad. For touring set up. It weighs a lot less than it did with the 3x crank and diamondback alloy bars. Diamondback says the original is 21 lbs and I would place my build at around 18-19 lbs compared to my other bikes.

    Mud has not been a big issue. It has more clearance than you would guess above the tire for the integrated fender mount and for larger 700c tires, but at 2.1” tires, it is the side clearance that is really tight. If you are pulling big pebbles up in mud, this may be a concern for your paint job. Truthfully, I haven’t had this materialize in my riding.

  16. #91
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcolingham View Post
    The other Haanjos appear to have clearance for bigger tires when you drop to 650b/27.5 instead of 700c. I have read that the forks on the comps and EXP are the same in carbon for carbon and alu for alu comparisons. I have rode the aluminum bike and it is nice and comfortable. When you hop on my EXP, it immediately feels like a very mature and well laid out ride.
    Nice, thanks. I've got a Comp like the one in the pic, bone stock. I've been using it for gravel rides, but have been considering using it on FS roads and mellower trails for light bikepacking trips. With some fatter 27.5 tires, lower gearing, and a set of Cowchippers, I think it would be pretty fun.It just seems like there's a limit to what's worth doing? There are some trips I'd like to do that I think would to benefit from a mountain bike.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

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