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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Bottom feeding
    Posts
    4,492
    I had a long talk with a bike fitting dude who told me the same things about crank length. He said he now uses a shorter crank than his 1 foot shorter wife. They figure this out by doing the power test, and his power was the best with 165 cranks or whatever.
    Well maybe I'm the faggot America
    I'm not a part of a redneck agenda

  2. #27
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    where the rough and fluff live
    Posts
    4,193
    Quote Originally Posted by Mudfoot View Post
    Tons of research and help on setting up your seat position on a road bike. Does everyone set their mtb seat in the exact same position (i.e. setback from bottom bracket) as their road bike, or is it setup slightly different?
    I try to keep my hips in mostly the same spot, relative to the BB. Road/cx saddle height is a little taller + slightly further back than my MTB top position. Road/cx is optimized for pedaling, not for moving around on the bike.

    I thought the whole point of dropper posts was/is to help you get closer to that optimal road/cx pedaling height/position at topout, while giving you plenty of trail-riding mobility. Not just the ability to slam it for descents, but the useful adjustments for pedaling.

    On shortie cranks, whenever I've used 165 or 170 I've felt like I gave up leverage. I've used 180 on SS bikes and liked the leverage for climbs or quick bursts, but at 110+ cadence they feel a little wonky to me. Doubt I'd use them for a geared bike, but I'm only 5'10". Maybe if I was 6'5" with a 36" inseam.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Oakland, CA
    Posts
    1,004
    Quote Originally Posted by creaky fossil View Post
    I try to keep my hips in mostly the same spot, relative to the BB. Road/cx saddle height is a little taller + slightly further back than my MTB top position. Road/cx is optimized for pedaling, not for moving around on the bike.

    I thought the whole point of dropper posts was/is to help you get closer to that optimal road/cx pedaling height/position at topout, while giving you plenty of trail-riding mobility. Not just the ability to slam it for descents, but the useful adjustments for pedaling.

    On shortie cranks, whenever I've used 165 or 170 I've felt like I gave up leverage. I've used 180 on SS bikes and liked the leverage for climbs or quick bursts, but at 110+ cadence they feel a little wonky to me. Doubt I'd use them for a geared bike, but I'm only 5'10". Maybe if I was 6'5" with a 36" inseam.
    I use my dropper for both slamming descents and adjusting power on climbs and trail rides. That is where the staged posts usually have at least three settings.

    I have 34 inseems and ride a 180mm crank arm on CX. If I am stupid, I sometimes tap my crank arm and curse not going short. When I am on flats, I praise the stroke.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    1,230
    My understanding is the latest road theory for saddle position is trending forward of what we've been used to.

    I'm happy with the evolution of steep seat tubes in mountain biking (Transition, Specialized, Pole, Nicolai). I think finally bike designers are figuring out road position is NOT mountain bike position where there is more climbing on loose surfaces and a more central/forward position helps with traction. So the old plumb line and axle rule need not apply in mtbing (and road theory changing too for that matter).

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    tip of the right hand stache
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by jcolingham View Post
    I praise the stroke.
    Breathing intensifies

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