Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    33

    40m Rope for Alpine Use

    Getting more into (ski) mountaineering and light alpine climbing and want my own dedicated rope. Pretty settled on the Mammut 8.7 Serenity Dry, but trying to choose length. Options I'm considering are 60m, or 80m and cut it in half, probably give/sell 1 half.

    40m seems like enough rope for most glacier travel scenarios with 2-3 person rope team. I don't foresee needing long rope for belays or raps because I'm not looking to do big, crazy steep sections.

    Don't care about it as a climbing rope because i have a non-treated workhorse for pure rock.

    Question is: would it be dumb to roll out with only 40m? If I go with the 60 am I going to have 30m always coiled and wish I had a 40m rope?

    Specific zones I plan on using it are the Tantalus, Shuksan, etc. as a skiier. Not super concerned about bagging summits or ascents, more about access (ie short raps, steps, etc.) and safety (ie glacier and cornice travel).

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    outer Spokanistan
    Posts
    298
    buy a 40m ..... the odds are low someone would buy the leftover piece if
    you cut a longer rope in half
    "we all do dumb shit when we're fucked up" mike tyson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
    1,350
    There's a better rope for that. 6.5 mm rap line ii by edelrid

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
    There's a better rope for that. 6.5 mm rap line ii by edelrid
    I think he needs something dynamic.

    Take a look at the Beal Rando. It's available in both 30m and 48m and designed for ski mountaineering. If you're not leading on it, no need for anything over 8mm. FWIW 30 seems to be long enough for most of my needs but I'm a weight weenie.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    23
    30m is good for a 2-man glacier rope team, 40 is good for 3. One nice thing about a 60 is having the option to fold it in half and use it as a 30m double/half lead setup if you expect to hit small sections of technical climbing. Depends on your objectives really, if you don't forsee any patches of lead climbing then go with the shortest length to save weight (40m)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    234
    8.7mm seems pretty big for the intended purpose. Living away from glaciers nowadays, I don't get the most time, but my preferred setup for skiing (assuming that unroped travel will be common) is a 30m and a 20m. Travel 10m apart on the 30. Each skier then has 20m available for rescue. And when unroped, the team has two ropes.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    2,312
    30-40m is perfect for what you described. The 30mm Beal Rando is a classic but there is the occasional rappel or four person trip where I'm wishing it was a little longer. If you need a longer rappel, bring two ropes (your buddy probably needs one too, right? Buy the same one, or get the long 60-80m version and cut it in half).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
    Posts
    1,350
    The rap ii is static and for a couple of falls,
    dynamic too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bronco View Post
    I think he needs something dynamic.

    Take a look at the Beal Rando. It's available in both 30m and 48m and designed for ski mountaineering. If you're not leading on it, no need for anything over 8mm. FWIW 30 seems to be long enough for most of my needs but I'm a weight weenie.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
    The rap ii is static and for a couple of falls,
    dynamic too.
    Guess I'll have to check that rope out.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    10,417
    Depends. For most of the glacier travel we've done over the past 30 years I'd get a 60m twin and cut it in half to make two 30m ropes. If you sell one you'll eventually regret it. Take one 30m rope for 2- or 3-man team for most basic glacier routes. Pack the second rope if you expect raps or want an extra rescue rope or want to twin up for short rock pitches. Our group has twin and half ropes in various lengths from 20m to 70m, and the 25m and 30m ropes get the most use by far. 40m would be a good length for a 4-man team, but I'd usually rather have two 2-person teams on shorter ropes. We also sometimes pack a 25-30 twin for a hand line on (ostensibly) non-technical routes for the unknown unknowns.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Ventura Highway in the Sunshine
    Posts
    19,410
    The "light alpine" part is key. I assume you will be using it to lead alpine pitches, so a 40 is a reasonable length and not too heavy in a fat enough diameter to be a lead rope.

    I just got off the Grand Teton with JHMG and that is what they are using for that application. If you plan on more technical climbs then a 60m would be better (which is what we used on the other days for rock climbs.)

    I agree it is a constitutional right for Americans to be assholes...its just too bad that so many take the opportunity...
    iscariot

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Posts
    6

    fine

    should be fine

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    [a] Van [down by the river]
    Posts
    1,123
    Quote Originally Posted by DIYSteve View Post
    Depends. For most of the glacier travel we've done over the past 30 years I'd get a 60m twin and cut it in half to make two 30m ropes.
    ^ This.

    Our party also has a variety of ropes, and the 2x30m is what we bring most often, either 1 of them, or both of them.

    https://www.backcountry.com/mammut-t...ing-rope-7.5mm

    30m of this packs down nice and small too.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    10,417
    2 x 30 also gives you a nearly 100' rap. One 40m rope would be better for climbing some alpine rock routes, but it gives you only a 66' rap.

    The answer to OP's question is very route specific. He says that he "do[es]n't foresee needing long rope for belays or raps because I'm not looking to do big, crazy steep sections." I interpret that as excluding all Grand Teton routes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •