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  1. #1
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    Lightroom workflow? General questions.

    I searched but didn't find much. How do most of you handle the process? I'm new to this, but if I upload a couple hundred photos from a weekend trip, I'll go through and find the best ones (Less than 10% for me it seems, I'd also like to know what percentage of "keepers" most of you are shooting) and then edit those and export them as JPEG's to another folder. I'm not using the tags or organization features at all right now because I haven't really learned how. I think there might be a way to batch auto correct to get all of the photos 90% there but I haven't learned that either. So what do most of you do? I can't imagine anyone sitting down and editing all 200 photos.

  2. #2
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    Tons of different options obviously so I suggest trying lots to see what works best for you. I have different workflows for different size projects. Some folks sort the images before an import, you can do this using the basic desktop image viewer or tons of different programs out there at different $ points.

    If you decide to sort within lightroom then for sure learn to use the different tags and filtering options (they're super useful).

    I think this site has some pretty good info. Lots of different articles on here for a variety of stuff.

    https://photographylife.com/masterin...ssing-workflow
    Quote Originally Posted by The SnowShow View Post
    Keystone is the new Snowbird

  3. #3
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    As far as the keeper rate goes, depends on what activity.

    Lately I've tried to press the shutter a lot less and think more before the shot so i'd say for landscapes and such I'd be closer to 80%

    Anything with action is a different story, I still am a fan of the good old spray and pray. So ya, maybe around 10% in that case
    Quote Originally Posted by The SnowShow View Post
    Keystone is the new Snowbird

  4. #4
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    Apr 2012
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    Ha. Yeah, for action shots a 10% keeper rate would be awesome! Just shot 700 photos at a wakeboard comp and walked away with like 40 images I'm happy with.

    For really big imports I like using the star method that I think I heard about from a blog post by Adam Barker where you go through once and star anything that is in focus and well exposed, then go through and give it a quick gut check and if you kinda like it give them two stars. From the two start group you get continuously more picky as you go up to three, four and even five stars. I usually only edit shots that make the three star list, and I like to make one set of rough adjustments for each lighting scenario and then copy and paste them onto all the photos that have the same light.

    It goes pretty fast once you get the hang of it.

    There are things like keeping a local version of a smaller images if you use external hard drives that I'd like to learn so I'm not always playing the game of emptying out space for me new shoots.
    phil-herbert.com

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bronic View Post
    If you decide to sort within lightroom then for sure learn to use the different tags and filtering options (they're super useful).

    I think this site has some pretty good info. Lots of different articles on here for a variety of stuff.

    https://photographylife.com/masterin...ssing-workflow
    Thanks for the link, I need to do lots of reading.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phildo_Baggins View Post
    Ha. Yeah, for action shots a 10% keeper rate would be awesome! Just shot 700 photos at a wakeboard comp and walked away with like 40 images I'm happy with.

    For really big imports I like using the star method that I think I heard about from a blog post by Adam Barker where you go through once and star anything that is in focus and well exposed, then go through and give it a quick gut check and if you kinda like it give them two stars. From the two start group you get continuously more picky as you go up to three, four and even five stars. I usually only edit shots that make the three star list, and I like to make one set of rough adjustments for each lighting scenario and then copy and paste them onto all the photos that have the same light.

    It goes pretty fast once you get the hang of it.

    There are things like keeping a local version of a smaller images if you use external hard drives that I'd like to learn so I'm not always playing the game of emptying out space for me new shoots.
    I like the star method. Do you go back and delete the no-star photos, or is there no reason to? I also like the idea of being able to use one set of adjustments and apply to a group of photos, if you have any articles that explain how to do that, please share.

  6. #6
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    This is a good thread about different techniques for applying global edits: https://forums.adobe.com/thread/1291235
    phil-herbert.com

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phildo_Baggins View Post
    Ha. Yeah, for action shots a 10% keeper rate would be awesome! Just shot 700 photos at a wakeboard comp and walked away with like 40 images I'm happy with.
    Ya that may be generous. I was thinking if I fire off 10 shots in burst mode for a turn of skiing. There's gonna be one maybe two $ shots. Obviously that's assuming focus and exposure were correct
    Quote Originally Posted by The SnowShow View Post
    Keystone is the new Snowbird

  8. #8
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    Workflow is definitely big on personal preference.
    The are probably more efficient ways to do my workflow, but I do it the same every time, and it works for me, so I stick to it.

    - Files go form card to external hard drive. Nothing gets deleted from cards until its on my external and the backup of that external.
    - Most of my organization is on the hard drive. File Structure goes Season/Year, then Shoot/Date. ie Summer2017 is the parent folder, with 7/27/17_TigerMountainMTB 6/21/17_OlympicPen etc.
    - The folder gets dragged, dropped, and imported to Lightroom (I know many may import straight through Lightroom)
    - Once everything is imported do a first pass through ALL photos. If it's worth a second look at all, it gets a star. This should only take a couple of minutes, even with huge exports. Taking a blind guess, I'd say this is probably 10-20 out of 100.
    - Go through the 1-star photos. Anything that is going to get edited gets 2-stars. (If it's a giant import, I might add another level of quick culling, ie pass through and label 2-stars, then anything getting edited gets 3)
    - Edit the 2-stars
    - Anything getting exported gets 3-stars
    - Export. My most used presets are Web-res Jpeg, Full-res Jpeg, and Tiff. Each preset has the exported files go to the folder on my external that has the raws, ie >Summer2017> 6/21/17_OlympicPen>WebRes

    I never delete anything unless I run out of space. Photographers are hoarders.
    Colorado seems like a sweet place except for the people that go there because it seems like a sweet place making it no longer a sweet place...

    https://www.facebook.com/MattSklarMedia

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    workflow

    The question is how do you organize on your HDD with HDR.....or timelapse....or HDR timelapse.....or stitches....HDR stitches...HDR timelapse stitches....VR HDR timelapse stitches?!

  10. #10
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    If you guys upload 100 photos how long does it take you to get to them and edit? How long do you typically take per photo, assuming basic edit? Just curious.

  11. #11
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    Maybe 10-30 seconds a photo... Longer if it's particularly special...

    I almost have the _exact_ same workflow as Sklar.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Here is the general workflow that works for me:

    - During / after a trip, cards are dump to an 'Inbox' folder. Each card dump goes into its own subfolder to prevent file name collisions, sometimes organize them further by camera.
    - Photos are reviewed in Canon's DPP software. For culling photos, DPP's Quick Check function is super fast and good enough to decide if I want to keep a photo. Any photos I want to keep are rated 2 stars.
    - Unrated photos are deleted, and 2-star photos are moved/imported into my LR catalog.
    - Photos reviewed & tagged in LR, ones that I like enough to edit are graduated to a 3-star rating.
    - 3-star photos are reviewed again; most 3-stars are added to online galleries. Ones that stand out in this group are considered 'printable' and graduated to a 4-star rating.

    The method seems to scale pretty well. In July I came back with 15,534 photos/video (542 GB) from Katmai; had them culled down to 3k within a few days, and rated/tagged/shared within a week.

  13. #13
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    You delete photos?!?!?!?!?!?! What if you need an underexposed and out of focus photo of a Nepalese bus one day and you just deleted it?

    [only half kidding...... hahah]
    phil-herbert.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Not enough storage space otherwise.

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