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  1. #1
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    Patching a cut tire?

    Anyone have any luck glueing and patching a cut MTB tire?
    I have a bunch of almost new tires that have a cut that was too big for Stand to seal. Can I clean up the inside of cut area, scuff up the rubber and use a vulcanizing glue and one of those funny orange and black patches I used as kid?
    I could probably get away running these tires with a tube, but I haven't run tubes in 10 years. I seriously have 5 tires that have less than 2 days on them. I would love to patch them, but not sure how the Stans will react? Any advice?

    I was gluing some hiking boot soles and saw my stack of "tube only" tires and got thinking I could find some advice on TGR.

  2. #2
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    Mar 2008
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    If I had 2 day old tires I would definaltey try an inside patch, I can't see why they wouldnt work with stans?

    I just had my truck tire fixed and buddy tells me they use a patch/plug combo which will never fail
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    I used to patch inside punctures before I discover tubeless plugs. Clean, dry & scuff the area, use vulcanising solution and a patch the same as you would on a tube (black & orange Tiptop patches are exactly what I used), then some more vulcanising solution or urethane glue on top of the edges of the patch just to be sure. I never had one of these repairs fail. I got hold of some Tiptop "special cement" at one point which is their specific stuff for this job instead of vulcanising solution. A friend also patched a large sidewall slice once by gluing a piece of inner tube on it, but not sure what glue he used.

    Get some tubeless plugs for the future too. I like the Weldtite kit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Missoula
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    My rear tire has a bunch of patches in it. Works well unless it's a big cut- the patch will bulge out.


    Sent from my XT1575 using TGR Forums mobile app

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    In a van... down by the river
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    Do yourself a favor and get automotive tire patches - the big-assed ones at the auto-parts store. I've even been able to patch tubeless snakebites with those things.

    Clean everything up really well before you glue them on.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    san diego
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    I've heard of bikepackers successfully sewing the tire back together after slicing a sidewall. Sew it, then apply crazy glue, and that combo being enough that stans will hold a seal. Definitely more of a temporary solution. But I could see doing that and then patching the inside. The thread might help stop it from bulging out too much.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    where the rough and fluff live
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    I've put a glue-type tube patch on a tire casing cut & had no issues. The tire had Stan's for its whole life of use prior to the cut. I rinsed it with water, scuffed the area clean with sandpaper, applied some EtOH, let it dry, then applied the patch with the usual smear of glue, 5 mins cure, and install patch. To make sure it would hold, I put a tube in there, mounted the tire/tube, filled with air, left to sit overnight. Next day, removed tube, put Stan's valve back in rim, filled with Stan's, and it held until I swapped that tire out.

    On the trail this might be a hassle, if I get a casing cut on the trail I dump the Stan's, install a tube, and put a CLIF bar wrapper piece in between tube & casing cut, then inflate & carry on.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Land of Brine Shrimp and Magic Underwear
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    Definitely works.

    Quote Originally Posted by skaredshtles View Post
    Do yourself a favor and get automotive tire patches - the big-assed ones at the auto-parts store. I've even been able to patch tubeless snakebites with those things.

    Clean everything up really well before you glue them on.
    Yeah get these, cheap, big and tough. I don't recommend actually scuffing the inside because the fibers start to fray. Just clean real well with alcohol. I tend to use a rectangular patch placed perpendicular to the tire, regardless of the orientation of the tear. That gives more support and helps prevent the patch from bulging out the tear. Also, Like Creaks said, putting a tube in it overnight helps the patch set well.
    There's nothing better than sliding down snow... flying through the air.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Raleigh
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    Depends on the rubber. Whatever their formula, some rubbers take to cleaning and gluing better than others. Some rubbers have a wet feel to them even after slot of cleaning with alcohol. If you run into this, let your first layer of glue thoroughly. Like a day or two. And any time you're gluing , the thinnest layer of adhesive possible. Thicker equals bad adhesion. Once that first layer completely cures, apply with a second very thin layer, let it get 90% dry, then apply patch.
    I like Creaky's idea if pressing it on with an inflated tube. Overnight.
    Black/orange tube patch vs automotive patch? I let the size and location of the tear dictate.

    If I do a patch and the outside surface still looks visibly torn and separated, I order a replacement
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  10. #10
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    May 2010
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    where the rough and fluff live
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    Quote Originally Posted by beaterdit View Post
    I don't recommend actually scuffing the inside because the fibers start to fray.
    True, they do. I go easy, just trying to get rid of the dried Stan's. And stay to the size of the patch's footprint. Scotchbrite is a little gentler. Whatever casing threads I might fray don't really hurt the tire integrity for a pinner lightweight such as me. The tread goes before the casing gets soft/wobbly on any but a paper-thin XC race tire casing for me. Bigger/more aggressive riders should probably be more careful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whistler
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    Thanks for all the replies. I have been fortunate enough to get my tires in bulk at a relatively low price through shop deal or through sponsored riders. As that supply is now dwindling and I am thinking about my long term future.
    My most recent mount that lasted 3 downhill corners really made me evaluate patching.
    I have some shop experience in gluing road tubulars and understand the thin glue formula, and I guess I'll end up resorting to the re-glue re-use school of tires.
    I'll take photos and post a TR when I get around to it. I still have 3 fresh tires before I have to mount a re-glue.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    This has worked for me YMMV:

    Clean tire, allow it to dry.
    Apply Aquaseal to the cut, back with a scrap of Tyvek (I use material from discarded, large fedex envelopes).
    Mount to rim, install a tube, inflate to max tire pressure, allow to cure for 24 hours.
    Remove tire/tube, check patch (if it doesn't feel completely cured I will allow it to cure longer off the rim and without the tube).
    Once fully cured, reinstall sealant/tire, ride on.
    Alpental Indigenous

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    northern BC
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    I'm a huge AQS fanboy/user I use it to fix all kinds of shit and that does sound like it would work ^^

    I imagine you wana splooge some thru the cut to lock it into the tire casing?

    I love it !
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    Tires have a releasing agent on the inside which was applied so they'd come out of the mould. You need to hit the tire with some brake cleaner before sanding to remove it.

    For small holes that are just beyond Stans sealing, a dab of krazy glue has worked for me.

    Tube patches (black and orange) are good for smaller cuts but will bulge out in bigger ones. As others have stated, a radial tire patch (similar idea but thicker) will do the trick.

    After patching, make sure to apply pressure overnight. Inflating a tube in the repaired tire can do it, or a clamp or weight placed on the repair.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    208
    one thing that will help is to stop using that Stan's POS, use Orange Seal instead (it's much better IMO).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by SJG View Post
    one thing that will help is to stop using that Stan's POS, use Orange Seal instead (it's much better IMO).
    When I say "Stans" its a genericization for "tubeless tire sealant". Please don't assume its a problem with a specific brand of sealant, or that I'm an off the shelf sealant guy.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    208
    no problem, but when you say "Stans" I assume you mean Stan's. I wonder how many folks assumed that Stan's meant Stan's, and not something else.

  18. #18
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    Sep 2010
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    Patching a cut tire?

    Normal tube patch - clean with rubbing alcohol, heat area with hair dryer, use thin glue, wait till almost dry, apply patch, clamp and wait. Had a DHF last year with 8 of those applied throughout most of the season before the tread wore out - bike park and all. Even had a patch right next to the bead - shop said a patch wouldn't hold but it did. I usually have 4 or so patches on a tire before the tread wears down. Been doin it for years. Never had a patch go bad on me once.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    I'm a huge AQS fanboy/user I use it to fix all kinds of shit and that does sound like it would work ^^

    I imagine you wana splooge some thru the cut to lock it into the tire casing?

    I love it !
    Me too, have used it for a long time to repair just about anything...

    I apply it liberally (on the inside of the casing, under the Tyvek), when I remount the tire and inflate the tube, it forces some out through the tear. I have yet to have one come apart at the repair prior to the tires tread going away.
    Alpental Indigenous

  20. #20
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    Aqua seal is the perfect repair adhesive/filler for anything flexible. If only I could either get it in mini bottles or figure out a way to keep it from drying out.....
    If you want me to take a dump in a box and mark it tubeless, I will. I got spare time.

  21. #21
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    Nov 2005
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    1,888
    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    Aqua seal is the perfect repair adhesive/filler for anything flexible. If only I could either get it in mini bottles or figure out a way to keep it from drying out.....
    Tried freezing it?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jono View Post
    Tried freezing it?
    This, works every time for me.
    As XXX-er has mentioned else where, putting it in a jar before sticking it in your freezer is advised.
    Alpental Indigenous

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,902
    Just put a 3/4" stick through the rear tire on my bike. Air held until I pulled the stick out. :-( The upside is that I started braking due to the stick before I came around the corner and scared the horses/riders. Still got a good deal of cursing at me. Gotta love riding in Montana.

    I'm going to try the AQS and Tyvek idea. I haven't run tubeless on these rims, but was planning on doing the conversion prior to this issue. Sounds like I don't need to be concerned from the experience in this thread.

    Seth

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by SJG View Post
    one thing that will help is to stop using that Stan's POS, use Orange Seal instead (it's much better IMO).
    is this the general consensus around here? been using stans for years. love it when it works, absolutely hate it with a passion when it doesn't.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    Been running Orange Seal for a few months. I have as many orange spots on my riding clothes as white. Can't say I've noticed any significant improvement over Stan's.

    On my tires that seep, it seems to seep less than Stan's. I got the endurance stuff, but I haven't had it long enough to tell if it holds up any better. Sealant typically exits my tires before it has a chance to dry out, so I may never find out.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

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