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  1. #1
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    Instapot: Bullshit Pressure Cooker?

    Got that combo crock pot/pressure cooker after watching umpteen ads on TV about how this thing will basically replace the world's great chefs. All the things we tried with it, we usually get perfect with our oven.

    First thing they leave out is that the sucker takes about 15 to 20 minutes to warm up and pressurize, so you have to add that to your cooking time.

    We've done five meals in it so far. Three sucked ass and two were mediocre.

    The mediocre:

    . A large meatloaf made with the usual seasonings and herbs, oatmeal for filler and an egg mixed in with a mixture of beef, pork and veal--also, added a cup of Better Than Bullion mixed in a cup of water. Actually nice, but lacked any outer crust, which is understandable, since it cooks with steam.

    2. A pot roast, done with seasonings, a little parsley and cilantro, plus a cup pf water with BTB. The bottom part was okay, but the part above the water line was dry--hence the mediocre rating.

    The suck ass:

    1. Five pound whole chicken, warmed to room temp for an hour before cooking, done at the required time, 45 minutes on high pressure, comes out uncooked in the core.

    2. A six pound bird, room temp, done for 70 minutes on high pressure and let steam release naturally over 20 minutes, comes out uncooked in the core.

    3. A 4 pound pork shoulder, on the counter for one hour to get to room temp, with one cup of BTB flavored water, plus some herbs. Came out tough, uncooked in the core, after 66 minutes and 20 minutes of natural depressurizing. Part of it flaked with a fork. Most of it bled red and was tough.

    Any advice, similar experiences, etc.?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Mar 2010
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    Instapot: Bullshit Pressure Cooker?

    We have one cause the crock pot died. The crock pot portion of the instapot is awesome. I'm still figuring out the pressure cooker.

    The 2 best things I've done so far are Spaghetti Squash, and prepping wings.

    For the squash I slice it the long way and place on the rack, with the flesh side touching (twist the top half 90 degrees). Cook 5 minutes, comes out perfect.

    For wings I do 2-3 lbs placed on the rack and add 1/4 apple juice and a squirt of hot sauce. Cook 5 minutes while start the grill. Then finish on the grill with the wing sauce.

    I have done a couple other that have been good, but not enough to remember.

    My final verdict is totally worth it for the crockpot, the pressure cooker part is meh.

    I have the 8L, version.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamTRuTH View Post
    We have one cause the crock pot died. The crock pot portion of the instapot is awesome. I'm still figuring out the pressure cooker.

    The 2 best things I've done so far are Spaghetti Squash, and prepping wings.

    For the squash I slice it the long way and place on the rack, with the flesh side touching (twist the top half 90 degrees). Cook 5 minutes, comes out perfect.

    For wings I do 2-3 lbs placed on the rack and add 1/4 apple juice and a squirt of hot sauce. Cook 5 minutes while start the grill. Then finish on the grill with the wing sauce.

    I have done a couple other that have been good, but not enough to remember.

    My final verdict is totally worth it for the crockpot, the pressure cooker part is meh.

    I have the 8L, version.
    Haven't tried the crock part part, yet, but appreciate the feedback. Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2006
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    Uh, I love mine. Just the fact you can cook chicken breast from frozen... set and forget... boom. Done. It's awesome.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
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    Sep 2006
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    I use mine every week for making stock. It gets some use for other stuff too but, for me at least, it's worth owning it just because it makes such good stock in such a short amount of time.
    Brandine: Now Cletus, if I catch you with pig lipstick on your collar one more time you ain't gonna be allowed to sleep in the barn no more!
    Cletus: Duly noted.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeroforhire View Post
    Uh, I love mine. Just the fact you can cook chicken breast from frozen... set and forget... boom. Done. It's awesome.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I bet it's like the infomercial. Maybe not so good with whole birds and large hunks of meat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cruiser View Post
    I use mine every week for making stock. It gets some use for other stuff too but, for me at least, it's worth owning it just because it makes such good stock in such a short amount of time.
    A stock guy? Bravo!

  7. #7
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    Sep 2006
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    My stock isn't fancy though. Just meat, veg, herbs de provence, and s&p. But it takes less than an hour to have it cooked, strained, and cooling in mason jars on the counter. Did some risotto with a couple of quarts last night cuz they had fresh English peas at the grocery. It's a game changer...
    Brandine: Now Cletus, if I catch you with pig lipstick on your collar one more time you ain't gonna be allowed to sleep in the barn no more!
    Cletus: Duly noted.

  8. #8
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    Sep 2008
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    My wife kills it with the instapot. But it doesn't really mater what tools she cooks with. She does not cook large pieces of meat. When she does pork butt or brisket it has usually been cut into smaller (but much bigger than bite size) chunks. She also sometimes finished meat in the oven.

  9. #9
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    Feb 2003
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    Mine is great. Mashed potatoes in 24 minutes instead of an hour, pot roast in 90 minutes instead of 7-8 hours.

    If you did a pot roast with only a cup of water, of course it'll be dry. You don't have to cover with liquid like you do in a crock-pot, but you need a lot more than a cup!

    If you want a crust on your meatloaf, put it on "Sautee" first and sear a crust on both sides, then pressure-cook it. Meatloaf doesn't take that long, though, so we just bake it in the oven.

    Keep in mind that the steam is what's doing the cooking, so if you're putting stuff in dry or with only a cup of water, it's not going to cook at all! (It loses water through the vent as it's coming up to temperature.) I bet that's your problem. Add more stock or broth and try the chicken again.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spats View Post
    Mine is great. Mashed potatoes in 24 minutes instead of an hour, pot roast in 90 minutes instead of 7-8 hours.

    If you did a pot roast with only a cup of water, of course it'll be dry. You don't have to cover with liquid like you do in a crock-pot, but you need a lot more than a cup!

    If you want a crust on your meatloaf, put it on "Sautee" first and sear a crust on both sides, then pressure-cook it. Meatloaf doesn't take that long, though, so we just bake it in the oven.

    Keep in mind that the steam is what's doing the cooking, so if you're putting stuff in dry or with only a cup of water, it's not going to cook at all! (It loses water through the vent as it's coming up to temperature.) I bet that's your problem. Add more stock or broth and try the chicken again.
    Thx for the advice.

    Is the saute on meatloaf a separate cooking and then you add water?

    Sent from my SM-G920T using TGR Forums mobile app

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by charles martel View Post
    Thx for the advice.

    Is the saute on meatloaf a separate cooking and then you add water?
    Yes. The "saute" function is designed to use with the top off. It cranks up the heat high enough to put a sear on meat, and basically turns the bottom of the pot into an electric skillet. This will obviously burn things to the bottom if you don't put a little oil in beforehand and don't ever move/stir it! (Personally I just sear things in a cast-iron pan and then dump them in the Instant Pot, because it's kind of tricky to dig around in the bottom of the pot, especially if stuff sticks.) Then you turn it off, add your veggies and cooking liquid and whatnot, put the top on, and put it on the regular cooking cycle.

    This assumes you have an actual Instant Pot brand like we do. http://instantpot.com/ There are a lot of electric pressure cookers, and I don't know how the other ones work or what setting they might use.

    Good luck! Let us know how it works. We find it best to keep cans of chicken/beef/vegetable stock around, which generally make things taste a lot better than just adding water.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spats View Post
    Yes. The "saute" function is designed to use with the top off. It cranks up the heat high enough to put a sear on meat, and basically turns the bottom of the pot into an electric skillet. This will obviously burn things to the bottom if you don't put a little oil in beforehand and don't ever move/stir it! (Personally I just sear things in a cast-iron pan and then dump them in the Instant Pot, because it's kind of tricky to dig around in the bottom of the pot, especially if stuff sticks.) Then you turn it off, add your veggies and cooking liquid and whatnot, put the top on, and put it on the regular cooking cycle.

    This assumes you have an actual Instant Pot brand like we do. http://instantpot.com/ There are a lot of electric pressure cookers, and I don't know how the other ones work or what setting they might use.

    Good luck! Let us know how it works. We find it best to keep cans of chicken/beef/vegetable stock around, which generally make things taste a lot better than just adding water.
    Did stew beef with Better Than Boullian tonight with 3 cups of water. Really good. Thanks.

    Sent from my SM-G920T using TGR Forums mobile app

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by charles martel View Post
    Did stew beef with Better Than Boullian tonight with 3 cups of water. Really good. Thanks.

    Sent from my SM-G920T using TGR Forums mobile app
    Excellent! Glad to hear it.

    Electric pressure cookers are generally needlessly complicated and short on directions. What's the difference between Saute, Beef, Steam, Slow Cook, and Poultry? Top on or off? How much liquid should you add? I don't blame anyone for getting confused.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spats View Post
    Excellent! Glad to hear it.

    Electric pressure cookers are generally needlessly complicated and short on directions. What's the difference between Saute, Beef, Steam, Slow Cook, and Poultry? Top on or off? How much liquid should you add? I don't blame anyone for getting confused.
    Thx.

    Sent from my SM-G920T using TGR Forums mobile app

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