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  1. #2951
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Bethel, Maine
    Posts
    1,155
    Quote Originally Posted by Harry View Post
    Fake news.

    You have it backwards. If anything, aftermarket bumpers make the airbags deploy sooner.


    https://thecustomtruck.com/do-afterm...ffect-airbags/




    Sent from my iPad using TGR Forums
    Do modern trucks even use impact force sensors or are they using accelerometers?

    I thought I had read the latter for my 2017 F-150, but I can't recall for sure.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using TGR Forums mobile app

  2. #2952
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    driving past the Stop and Shop
    Posts
    2,994
    Quote Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post
    Planning to replace pads and rotors on a 2002 Outback this weekend with my SIL. Local big boxes have crappy service, high prices compared to online and spotty parts quality. What etailer do you like for their service? Brands/types of rotors and pads that you like?
    Napper or Rockauto has what you need. Be sure to use silicone lube on the slide pins.
    Damn, we're in a tight spot!

  3. #2953
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Southeast New York
    Posts
    8,833
    Apparently there are only a couple of factories in the world that produce brake rotors and they are all in China. Obviously there are varying quality levels etc. but the differences, supposedly, aren't as significant as we think. IOW they're all shit. FWIW Powerstop is Centric just advertised differently. Has anybody noticed that there's a rotor shortage? I have to do my rears asap and haven't been able to get anything good locally for about a week, only base level, uncoated ones. I have one more option I'm trying in a few minutes when they open so I can do it today's otherwise it's off to Rock Auto land. Sux because I have to what's going to be a shaky 700 mile road trip tomorrow up to the 'daks.

  4. #2954
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tejas
    Posts
    8,692
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    I have one more option I'm trying in a few minutes when they open so I can do it today's otherwise it's off to Rock Auto land. Sux because I have to what's going to be a shaky 700 mile road trip tomorrow up to the 'daks.
    Call around to indie shops that have parts departments if you have any around you. When I did my brake job last time, ends up that RockAuto sent me the wrong size for the rears. Their customer service thankfully owned up and gave me a refund right away without any trouble, but they didn't have any of the right ones in stock and I needed my car back on the road stat. Found a Euro shop who not only had the factory rotors in stock, but they were also surprisingly inexpensive, being only about $10 more than Rockauto for the pair, although to be fair my Rockauto ones were the cross drilled "performance" rotors over my factory ones (which were just fine tho). I'll just go to them next time if my car even makes it to its next brake job. Haha.

  5. #2955
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    9,511

    Wrenchin... Adventures under the hood... Put em here.

    Quote Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post
    Planning to replace pads and rotors on a 2002 Outback this weekend with my SIL. Local big boxes have crappy service, high prices compared to online and spotty parts quality. What etailer do you like for their service? Brands/types of rotors and pads that you like?
    Replaced front and rear on the MILs Impreza recently. I think time was a factor, so I went with a PowerStop kit (ceramic pads, coated rotors, grease, etc) from Amazon. PowerStop can be hit or miss, but this one was a hit. The rotors were new and straight and the pads fit properly, everything new and shrink wrapped, nothing rusty or obviously used/remaníd.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  6. #2956
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tejas
    Posts
    8,692
    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Replaced front and rear on the MILs Impreza recently. I think time was a factor, so I went with a PowerStop kit (ceramic pads, coated rotors, grease, etc) from Amazon. PowerStop can be hit or miss, but this one was a hit. The rotors were new and straight and the pads fit properly, everything new and shrink wrapped, nothing rusty or obviously used/reman’d.
    Yeah. My experience with the brand was good too. Although, there's enough stories of misses out there for me to know the brand isn't perfect, but I'd buy them again. Was handy the kit comes with everything needed, including instructions, which I needed being my first brake job attempted.

  7. #2957
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Southeast New York
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    8,833
    Quote Originally Posted by MontuckyFried View Post
    Call around to indie shops that have parts departments if you have any around you. When I did my brake job last time, ends up that RockAuto sent me the wrong size for the rears. Their customer service thankfully owned up and gave me a refund right away without any trouble, but they didn't have any of the right ones in stock and I needed my car back on the road stat. Found a Euro shop who not only had the factory rotors in stock, but they were also surprisingly inexpensive, being only about $10 more than Rockauto for the pair, although to be fair my Rockauto ones were the cross drilled "performance" rotors over my factory ones (which were just fine tho). I'll just go to them next time if my car even makes it to its next brake job. Haha.
    I went through the options and everything came out $100 higher, some were a lot more than that, this time and most of those were for uncoated rotors which rust away to dust in a year here. Ehh whatever, I got new parking brake hardware and pads and the wear sensor wire for $80 less than the Auto Zone Duralast Premium stuff so it's a win but I won't have it today before my road trip. I'll think of the wobble as if it's a back massage and just let it shake mildly down all the big hills

  8. #2958
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    LV-426
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    18,640
    Drilled rotors will just crack at the drill holes. They won't stop you any better. Paint your calipers some bright colors if you feel like showing off your brakes...
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  9. #2959
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    YetiMan
    Posts
    12,964
    So a pattern is now repeating in my life:

    I have old machines: terminally rusty 94 Toyota 4x4, 79 F250 work truck, 86 Honda cb450…I am not a mechanic, but I’m handy and I have access to mechanic friends for advice, I more or less know how to handle the things that come up with these old machines.
    I sell them to somebody local, I tell them everything I know about the machine, stuff I think may come up, stuff I’ve worked on, etc. New owner ends up being in over their head with the necessary awareness and maintenance and tlc these things require, then I get ongoing messages and calls as small stuff comes up. The electric fan isn’t working: check the ground. It’s leaking oil: maybe from the timing cover. Transfer case linkage feels sloppy: look at all the linkage pins and the plastic bushing at the lever pivot. It’s running hot with the plow attached at highway speed: put the blade in the bed for long highway trips. I’ve taken the trucks back and fixed stuff myself. I’m storing the motorcycle in my garage for the buyer. I try to help with advice and whatever I know about the machine, etc…but there’s always a tone of, like, hey this thing has problems now, wtf.

    I resist telling these guys: a clean version of that thing goes for 5-10x what I sold it for, you drive it around for years/months/whatever, this stuff comes up with old machines…it’s all part of the deal.

    It’s frustrating, none of these were dumped with hidden problems, but that becomes the passive-aggressive implication. I’ve been buying and driving/riding old junk since the early 90s and only rarely have I reached out to a seller with a problem, and that was a same-day thing with a dealer.

    Part of it, I think, is a small-town dynamic where we’re used to being more accessible to each other (about a lot of things)…but at some point I always find myself wanting to say look, when I had it stuff came up too, when I sold it, it was partly to move on, and part of what made me good at keeping it roadworthy was that I was the one driving it and passing close attention to it…that’s you now.

    What strategies, if any, do you guys employ to avoid this kind of ongoing quasi-responsibility for rigs you’ve sold?

  10. #2960
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Granite, UT
    Posts
    1,212
    Quote Originally Posted by ill-advised strategy View Post
    So a pattern is now repeating in my life:

    I have old machines: terminally rusty 94 Toyota 4x4, 79 F250 work truck, 86 Honda cb450…I am not a mechanic, but I’m handy and I have access to mechanic friends for advice, I more or less know how to handle the things that come up with these old machines.
    I sell them to somebody local, I tell them everything I know about the machine, stuff I think may come up, stuff I’ve worked on, etc. New owner ends up being in over their head with the necessary awareness and maintenance and tlc these things require, then I get ongoing messages and calls as small stuff comes up. The electric fan isn’t working: check the ground. It’s leaking oil: maybe from the timing cover. Transfer case linkage feels sloppy: look at all the linkage pins and the plastic bushing at the lever pivot. It’s running hot with the plow attached at highway speed: put the blade in the bed for long highway trips. I’ve taken the trucks back and fixed stuff myself. I’m storing the motorcycle in my garage for the buyer. I try to help with advice and whatever I know about the machine, etc…but there’s always a tone of, like, hey this thing has problems now, wtf.

    I resist telling these guys: a clean version of that thing goes for 5-10x what I sold it for, you drive it around for years/months/whatever, this stuff comes up with old machines…it’s all part of the deal.

    It’s frustrating, none of these were dumped with hidden problems, but that becomes the passive-aggressive implication. I’ve been buying and driving/riding old junk since the early 90s and only rarely have I reached out to a seller with a problem, and that was a same-day thing with a dealer.

    Part of it, I think, is a small-town dynamic where we’re used to being more accessible to each other (about a lot of things)…but at some point I always find myself wanting to say look, when I had it stuff came up too, when I sold it, it was partly to move on, and part of what made me good at keeping it roadworthy was that I was the one driving it and passing close attention to it…that’s you now.

    What strategies, if any, do you guys employ to avoid this kind of ongoing quasi-responsibility for rigs you’ve sold?
    We drive our vehicles 'till they're used up. There's no way in hell I'd sell them to someone I knew. As for selling to a stranger, your purchase, your problem. I wouldn't even answer the phone if they called again.

  11. #2961
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tejas
    Posts
    8,692
    Quote Originally Posted by ill-advised strategy View Post
    What strategies, if any, do you guys employ to avoid this kind of ongoing quasi-responsibility for rigs you’ve sold?
    You've already tried what I do, which is being super straight forward about the issues (always a good policy!), but perhaps what helps is I use a Bill of Sale that makes it abundantly clear the vehicle is being sold AS IS, with the following language: "The Vehicle is being transferred on an “AS IS” basis, with no warranties, express or implied, as to the condition of the Vehicle."
    And then they have to sign it as buyer, along with me as seller. Never gotten so much as a follow-up text after that, so maybe it helps? I've had good luck selling my junkers. In fact, I JUST sold one of my vehicles on Saturday. I was stoked to get anything for it. Dude was stoked to buy it, even with yet another blown transmission. Everybody wins!

  12. #2962
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,819
    I usually never hear from my buyers either but for the last 6 months the guy who bought my Sportsmobile keeps asking me questions. Same MO of they don't seem to understand that it is their turn to figure things out in maintaining an old vehicle. I gave you the service manual and an entire notebook of all the service done...and you clearly don't read them and if you do you don't comprehend.

    My last message was "I guess you have it figured out then". I hope he gets the point that anymore questions and Im going to start charging consulting fees.

    I also point people to forums and especially YouTube. People want instant gratification so YouTube seems to give them that more than a Google search with too many hits.

    Deep down I want to think people are getting smarter but in reality people are getting more dumb being so dependent on information they don't even make time to process. Like global ADHD.

    Sucks being a nice guy who knows his stuff doesn't it?

    BTW they don't call you. They text and email you. Modern times

  13. #2963
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Granite, UT
    Posts
    1,212
    Quote Originally Posted by simple View Post
    BTW they don't call you. They text and email you. Modern times
    That's even easier to ignore.

  14. #2964
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Posts
    1,202
    I guess if you have a relationship you need to maintain then you answer the question.

    Otherwise, it ainít mine anymore. I have my own problems to deal with. Itís not like Iím trying to maintain some sort of Craigslist reputation or something.

    I also do what Montucky mentioned, which is a simple bill of sale and get the title paperwork filed ASAP.

  15. #2965
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Moose, Iowa
    Posts
    7,152
    Make them sign a note that says the seller understands they are buying this vehicle for parts and that it is not safe to drive.

    Just tell them it is to protect yourself and you can't sell the car to them unless they sign.

    I did that with the one car I sold that still ran. They had no problem signing it.

    Of course they did actually part it out. But the thing would still do 144 mph so if the 18 kid did a high speed run on the way home and the subframe flew apart I was covered.

    Should keep them from hassling you. You mean that parts car I sold you?

    Sent from my SM-G991U1 using Tapatalk

  16. #2966
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Montrose, CO
    Posts
    3,571
    I've sold a few cheap vehicles and bikes and only had one person contact me after the sale, a friend. Bike had some minor damage I forgot to disclose and he didn't notice. He had had the bike 24hrs and already destroyed the derailleur so I pretty much told him, sorry partner.

    When I sold my rusty ass montero sport a few years ago, the guy paid in advance and came to pick it up from WY in the dark. Drove it around the block onto the trailer and was talking about doing body work on it . Was half expecting a phone call the next day.

  17. #2967
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,013
    Quote Originally Posted by ill-advised strategy View Post
    So a pattern is now repeating in my life:

    I have old machines: terminally rusty 94 Toyota 4x4, 79 F250 work truck, 86 Honda cb450ÖI am not a mechanic, but Iím handy and I have access to mechanic friends for advice, I more or less know how to handle the things that come up with these old machines.
    I sell them to somebody local, I tell them everything I know about the machine, stuff I think may come up, stuff Iíve worked on, etc. New owner ends up being in over their head with the necessary awareness and maintenance and tlc these things require, then I get ongoing messages and calls as small stuff comes up. The electric fan isnít working: check the ground. Itís leaking oil: maybe from the timing cover. Transfer case linkage feels sloppy: look at all the linkage pins and the plastic bushing at the lever pivot. Itís running hot with the plow attached at highway speed: put the blade in the bed for long highway trips. Iíve taken the trucks back and fixed stuff myself. Iím storing the motorcycle in my garage for the buyer. I try to help with advice and whatever I know about the machine, etcÖbut thereís always a tone of, like, hey this thing has problems now, wtf.

    I resist telling these guys: a clean version of that thing goes for 5-10x what I sold it for, you drive it around for years/months/whatever, this stuff comes up with old machinesÖitís all part of the deal.

    Itís frustrating, none of these were dumped with hidden problems, but that becomes the passive-aggressive implication. Iíve been buying and driving/riding old junk since the early 90s and only rarely have I reached out to a seller with a problem, and that was a same-day thing with a dealer.

    Part of it, I think, is a small-town dynamic where weíre used to being more accessible to each other (about a lot of things)Öbut at some point I always find myself wanting to say look, when I had it stuff came up too, when I sold it, it was partly to move on, and part of what made me good at keeping it roadworthy was that I was the one driving it and passing close attention to itÖthatís you now.

    What strategies, if any, do you guys employ to avoid this kind of ongoing quasi-responsibility for rigs youíve sold?
    I would follow the first part of disclosing as much info as possible with a closing of you are buying a used POS for just a few bucks AS-IS so don't expect post sales support or refund. If you want something better go spend more money or pay an expert to check it out before the purchase. Maybe have the potential buyer watch the Brady Bunch episode of "caveat emptor" as part of the prepurchase protocol.

  18. #2968
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Southeast New York
    Posts
    8,833
    I always write on the bill of sale "Vehicle is sold AS IS. There are no warranties implied or expressed." Here in NY they have to sign and date the bill of sale and I make sure they see that. I've never heard back from the people I've unloaded my heaps on after the sale even though I know the vehicle is doomed. The last few had to be towed away so that helps...

    I pulled everything apart to do pads and rotors and a few other little things while the rotor is out of the way and doesn't it figure some joker stripped the rotor bolt and it doesn't come out now. Looks like I'm crossing my fingers an ez out does the trick (but I don't think it will). Any other ideas before I make it harder on myself?Click image for larger version. 

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  19. #2969
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    496
    Pound a torx socket bit into the head, it should grip. Maybe hit the thing with a propane or mapp torch first if you think it's rusted.

    Worst case, you drill off the head of it and it'll pop off. Don't replace that bolt, it serves no purpose. Lugs n wheel hold the rotor on, not that little thing

  20. #2970
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,819
    Lots of YouTube videos specifically about getting a broken rotor removal bolt out.

    It shouldn't be too hard as it isn't holding anything. You can drill it away or try an ez-out

  21. #2971
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    18,640
    Quote Originally Posted by dannynoonan View Post
    Pound a torx socket bit into the head, it should grip. Maybe hit the thing with a propane or mapp torch first if you think it's rusted.

    Worst case, you drill off the head of it and it'll pop off. Don't replace that bolt, it serves no purpose. Lugs n wheel hold the rotor on, not that little thing
    X2 on all of this.

    That bolt holds the rotor on during the assembly line at the factory. It's otherwise not needed.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  22. #2972
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Granite, UT
    Posts
    1,212
    Quote Originally Posted by gravitylover View Post
    Any other ideas before I make it harder on myself?
    I've used an impact screwdriver with whatever bit is close enough to grab.

    Also, FWIW, I've always put the new screw back in with a little anti seize. Never had a problem getting it back out later.



  23. #2973
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Big Sky/Moonlight Basin
    Posts
    11,661
    Installed a hitch on my Chevy Cruze 6MT. Very straightforward video on etrailer dot com. Took about an hour for the hitch, and another 30 minutes for the wiring. Now I donít have to borrow my brothers pickup to launch my boat.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    "Zee damn fat skis are ruining zee piste !" -Oscar Schevlin

    "Hike up your skirt and grow a dick you fucking crybaby" -what Bunion said to Harry at the top of The Headwaters

  24. #2974
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Southeast New York
    Posts
    8,833
    Perfect. Thanx all.

  25. #2975
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    14,168
    This is the RR?

    Cut a slot in it with a dremel so that you can fit a screwdriver blade in there. Hit it with a bit of heat from a propane torch and tap the screwdriver ccw with a hammer and it should give up.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

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