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  1. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,671
    Quote Originally Posted by Mofro261 View Post
    Not surprising that guy with the handle Hacksaw is suggesting we carry a hacksaw in the BC.

    That's right......
    "True love is much easier to find with a helicopter"

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    9,300ft
    Posts
    14,835
    A large hose clamp will keep your boot on a ski with a busted binding. FYI you can fold these up to make them small.
    Quote Originally Posted by blurred
    skiing is hiking all day so that you can ski on shitty gear for 5 minutes.

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    in the trench
    Posts
    3,993

    What to carry in the backcountry....

    A 4/6 pack of safety candles and large black plastic bag. I use the safety candles for skin wax(cheap cheap at the $ store and it works well) and black plastic bag for melting snow in the sun. Both could be a good shettler for a night. I still have to refill my parachute/kite string supply. That shit is strong and static and has some sort of wax coating. It's ez to tie and keep tight. Skied a broken og diamir for 4 days with that string holding it together

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Den/Baltimore
    Posts
    3,874
    Quote Originally Posted by Hacksaw View Post
    As for RECCO, there have been a number of LIVE recoveries with it.
    In the backcountry? Or just in lift-access terrain?
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    meager stoke

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    563
    Wasn't the pole repair kit a piece of thin gauge aluminum and a couple hose clamps? Wrap the aluminum, use hose clamps to keep in place. similar works for tent poles, if the tent design allows.

    a binding buddy/hex driver with a supply of bits that fit your gear if you are going luxury. if nothing else for the car/gear bag.

    Quote Originally Posted by auvgeek View Post
    In the backcountry? Or just in lift-access terrain?
    several live recoverys of off-piste skiers. parse that how you will. Not a party self-rescue tool, a tool for SAR (some euro choppers have it mounted) if only for body recovery in a short time

  6. #31
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juxtaposition
    Posts
    5,751
    All mentioned: bothy bag, warm puffy, InReach for efficient 2-way comms. I also carry a very small inflatable mattress, about 3 feet long.

    You need to pack for your specific environment, current conditions and proximity to help. For example, on many days for me, avalanches are actually a second order hazard v.s. serious injury from skiing into a hardwood tree. Other times/places it is cold (Canadian Rockies). Other times it is impossibility of egress due to terrain or weather magnifying a minor gear/injury issue.
    Last edited by neck beard; 04-25-2017 at 10:28 AM.
    Life is not lift served.

  7. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,671
    Quote Originally Posted by auvgeek View Post
    In the backcountry? Or just in lift-access terrain?
    They have been in and out of bounds and even in the backcountry too. Mainly in Europe.
    "True love is much easier to find with a helicopter"

  8. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eburg
    Posts
    10,625
    PLB or inReach

  9. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    North Vancouver/Whistler
    Posts
    9,828
    Quote Originally Posted by auvgeek View Post
    I would guess Lee tours enough to know all that.

    Lee, I've never seen such a device. My guess is it's not made because the insulated thermos part would weigh too much for most people to carry.

    Hose clamps are a good one — feel pretty dumb for not having thought of that given how often I use them around the lab.

    OP: Recco reflector seems hardly worth mentioning, right? My understanding is they're pretty much useful for body recovery only...
    Thx rod and auvgeek. Seems there's not a product like that. Probably because a thermos with good insulation would be a poor cookpot for any stove

    Btw - when i start a biggish day I start with hot water in the bottle so that i can melt snow in that bottle. And also if its hot enough a day to really need water I'll stick that bottle close to base layer which would then melt snow. Can get 2.5l out of a 1l bottle sometimes

    Re hoseclamps. That's good for a kit but I have something like 5 voile straps! Overkill but light and good for fixing stuff

  10. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    180
    On the jetboil/emergency stove question, on longer tours I'll carry a Supercat, some alcohol to feed it, and a metal water bottle I can use to make hot drinks.

  11. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sandy
    Posts
    4,648
    In the Wasatch a charged cell phone and a GPS app on it/knowing how to get your coordinates is huge (i.e compass on the iPhone) + generally knowing where the hell you are. I'm also a big fan of at least a basic first aid class, confidence when the shit hits the fan is huge. I usually try to think of my plan if something goes wrong before I leave the car (i.e. skiing the Wasatch is going to be different then a remote trip in Canada and require different things)
    Last edited by sfotex; 05-09-2017 at 08:40 AM.
    Life is a lot like climbing: there isn't anything much more comforting than a good #2.

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