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  1. #101
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    Mar 2006
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    Missoula, MT
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    I'm at the Ox on a Monday night. What do I win?
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  2. #102
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    Mar 2006
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    General Sherman's Favorite City
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    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    I'm at the Ox on a Monday night. What do I win?
    Is the Ox an animal or bar?

    Prizes depndant.
    I still call it The Jake.

  3. #103
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    May 2007
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    Sandy, Utah
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    14,411
    My kids first cavity first time on nitrous. What a hoot. Never flinched or complained once and when it was over asked if she could do it again. Nitrous talking. "Daddy was I in the desert or the sky? Neither.. then why did I see clouds?" Fun times

  4. #104
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    Feb 2006
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    Among Greatness All Around
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    5,833
    I thought this would be a discussion on what Matt Lauer or Savannah Guthrie had to say. Or Hoda Kotd's return and all new baby stories was all the talk.

  5. #105
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    May 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowing alpy View Post
    Kelly usually occupies the 9-10am block on the kitchen tv
    Much cuter if you ask me

  6. #106
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    Sep 2001
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    The Cone of Uncertainty
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    Quote Originally Posted by RShea View Post
    I thought this would be a discussion on what Matt Lauer or Savannah Guthrie had to say. Or Hoda Kotd's return and all new baby stories was all the talk.
    Hence, why I'm an addict. The hard core on here is as smart a group as you'll find anywhere, despite the fact that they're all idiots. It stays interesting.

  7. #107
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    Dec 2007
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    base of the Bush
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmillsSkier View Post
    Who's "we"?

    By my estimates I've spent nearly 2/3 of my life in the South yet I'll always be a carpetbagger Yankee to some here and yet it seems that its comments like yours that illustrate that concepts like reconciliation and acceptance are lost on many from all walks of life.

    And if you didn't already hear. The reanimated corpse of Gen. Sherman already burnt down one of the nations's busiest highways last month and just today put a launch ramp in the middle of another.

    http://jalopnik.com/a-gas-leak-put-t...nta-1794391005


    I think we'll make it through this one as well.

    Attachment 204570

    But thanks for the wise ass comment. It means I haven't lost my edge.
    It is Atlanta after all,


    www.apriliaforum.com

    "If the road You followed brought you to this,of what use was the road"?

    "I have no idea what I am talking about but would be happy to share my biased opinions as fact on the matter. "
    Ottime

  8. #108
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    Mar 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vt-Freeheel View Post
    It is Atlanta after all,


    That was one of the most fun weeks of my life in ATL. The wife and I got home just ahead of the walking dead scenario pictured of abandoned cars clogging every single street in the city. It was nuts, the 2" of snow compacted to the most slippery white ice I'd ever seen. And I grew up skiing in the midwest.

    We had a fully stocked bar, fridge, and zero responsibility for the next 4 days. Our local dive even stayed open thanks to a bartender walking 5 miles to open it up for us refugees. Hell, the local purveyor of illicit activities even made it up.

    It was like being snowed in the bar scene of Hot Dog The Movie with 40 of your best friends. I think we shut it down at 6 am and slid downhill back to our neighborhood on foot.
    I still call it The Jake.

  9. #109
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    Nov 2015
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    ^THIS is a movie I would go see.

  10. #110
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    Mar 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLS View Post
    ^THIS is a movie I would go see.
    It truly was amazing. It was unhinged hedonism at this tiny dive for 2 straight days while everything, and I mean everything, around it was either closed or out of power. It was like Odin shone down his light upon this one disgusting but exceedingly charming watering hole and drug emporium and said, "you heathens, you must carry on while I lay waste to your city".

    You didn't see people at all unless they were walking to try and find provisions/gas/their car during the daytime. We passed some Georgia Tech students that had a balcony on their house on a main street that had constructed an observation deck complete with large scoring numbers to rate the cars that would wreck at the bottom of the hill by their building every 10 minutes or so during the initial onslaught of the storm.

    No looting or anything bad like that, and people genuinely helped complete strangers out all over the city, but it was like a free for all party and no one cared what you did.
    I still call it The Jake.

  11. #111
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    Sep 2001
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    The Cone of Uncertainty
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurxSki View Post
    I gave up on trying to read through pages of bickering
    missed this gem before, wtf? It's what we do. Come on man.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmillsSkier View Post
    It truly was amazing. It was unhinged hedonism at this tiny dive for 2 straight days while everything, and I mean everything, around it was either closed or out of power. It was like Odin shone down his light upon this one disgusting but exceedingly charming watering hole and drug emporium and said, "you heathens, you must carry on while I lay waste to your city".

    You didn't see people at all unless they were walking to try and find provisions/gas/their car during the daytime. We passed some Georgia Tech students that had a balcony on their house on a main street that had constructed an observation deck complete with large scoring numbers to rate the cars that would wreck at the bottom of the hill by their building every 10 minutes or so during the initial onslaught of the storm.

    No looting or anything bad like that, and people genuinely helped complete strangers out all over the city, but it was like a free for all party and no one cared what you did.
    Awesome. We lived in DC (a very very snow-adverse city), on a major road (Wisconsin Avenue) on the 5th floor with a perfect view of the road as it came down the hill from where it meets River Rd. Ice storm equalled amazing total carnage. I'll never forget the bus that got sideways and wrecked every. single. car. on both sides of the road as it slid down the hill. He was hitting cars on one side with the front of the bus and the other side with the rear. And then he kept going when it got to the bottom. Just said fuckit and hit the gas. I actually called Metro to tell them about it, it was truly ridiculous how much damage was done. But i never heard back. Hey I tried.
    Last edited by iceman; 04-18-2017 at 10:12 PM.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    Awesome. We lived in DC on a major road (Wisconsin Avenue) on the 5th floor with a perfect view of the road as it came down the hill from where it meets River Rd. Ice storm equalled amazing total carnage. I'll never forget the bus that got sideways and wrecked every. single. car. on both sides of the road as it slid down the hill. And then kept going when it got to the bottom. Just said fuckit and hit the gas.
    I can only imagine how awesome that would be to see. (insert that. was. awesome. Tommy Boy voice here - assuming it wasn't your car that was hit)

    It was a similar setup here. We had walked with our dog to an overpass over I-75 to see the walking dead like carnage below on our way to the bar and came across the demo derby death gulch compete with cheering section and self-serve beer.

    Shit, I forgot we took our dog to the bar. That really was a great time.
    Last edited by BmillsSkier; 04-18-2017 at 10:31 PM. Reason: sloppy ass grammar
    I still call it The Jake.

  14. #114
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    No my car was fine. The whole thing took minutes to unfold, it was wreckage in slow motion. We kept thinking the bus would stop just out of the laws of physics and momentum and shit but it just didn't.

  15. #115
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    Oct 2003
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    Big in Japan
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    Probably went back to the union hall and got high fives all around.

    The world is perfect. Appreciate the details.

  16. #116
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    I can picture the bus driver after reaching the bottom of the carnage; something very similar to one of the few cars we saw make it through the ice gauntlet relatively unscathed.

    It was a couple of young guys in a truck that belongs in that Nowhere to go but down from here thread - lifted, Costa, Salt Life, and Browning stickers on a 70k truck gets it's back end out and slams one of the dead solders at the bottom of the heap and he absolutely guns it up the other side of the hill after the collision set him on the proper alignment - rooster tails flying.

    One of the Tech guys yells out loud, "NAILED IT!"

    I just about died laughing.
    I still call it The Jake.

  17. #117
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    200 cars severely damaged in that event is conservative. It's a long hill.

  18. #118
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    Apr 2002
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    Gare du Lyon
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    4,896
    The panic set in early. I opened up the zipper on my chestpack, grabbed the bar, opened the cellophane wrapper and ate slowly as I fumbled up the climb.

    There was no one around in the woods as far as I could see. The setting sun leaped across trees and leafs alike touching everything around me with a dissipated glow. Small amounts of water pooled on the side of the trail, the result of the previous storm that brought thunder, hail and lightning before dissipating into a typical spring afternoon of blue sky and clouds. Wildflowers were blooming by the trailside and the rivers were subsiding from the winter peak. The miles that clicked off easy at 6 were becoming more difficult, and the mental trick of knowing that everything you descend you are going to ascend again, on an out and back, was daunting.

    The panic was telling me to stop, to turn around, to leave. The panic also triggered my experience and that told me that I needed to eat, to fuel, to drink and carry on.

    Hearing the sound of other people behind me, I was overtaken by a group doing a quick out and back on a small portion of trail. They carried on in a conga line of people disappearing into the woods with yellow shirts and yelps. A quick 8 miles wasn't in my schedule today. Cresting the 8th climb of the day I dumped out of the final part of the trail onto a distant road. Never had I been here before, the area so foreign as any other place for the last 4 miles of the trail as it became more rocky, rutted and remote.

    12 miles in and I couldn't wait there, waiting was just delaying what needed to be done and what needed to be done was to get back on that trail as soon as possible. I didn't want to think about the rest. That was the last time I looked at my watch until 7 miles later.

    I ate a gu-waffle, took a drink of tailwind and told the group waiting there that I would see them when they caught me on the descent. I was intentionally not moving fast, today. The sun was setting and the ridge-line was exacerbating the darkness. I wanted to run as much of this in the day as possible. Down back into the woods and the thoughts crept up again.

    "Go home. Go home. Hitch back at the next road."

    The inner voice was shouting, but I would push it back down with effort and food. This thing was happening. I ticked off the miles as best as I could. I found a running stream and filled up the, now empty, bottles. Dropped in some electrolyte tabs and pushed on. Climbing 300 feet out of the unfamiliar portion of the trail, I finally had a word with myself that this run was happening in full as I crossed a fireroad back onto the trail again.

    The darkness won as I stumbled across the road hellbent on getting back to the trail as soon as possible. Maintain focus, here. No rest. I took off the pack, fished out my headlamp, ate another waffle and walked the steep climb back onto the trail so I could start running again. I had 6 miles, two climbs and one 1100 foot descent back out of here. I ran along now in complete silence and stillness. The only sounds were the animals waking up and the empty slap of my feet on the trail. In the distance you could see the lights of the port and the city reflecting off the waters edge below as my headlamp bobbed along the trail.

    I was back where I knew the trail intersections and signs. There was the cut log, there was the muddy part, there was the intersection for the fireroad. I plowed along and finished the final food I had on me with the knowledge that I packed too few calories what I wanted to accomplish. I couldn't even see the uphill and downhill that well by the illumination of the headlamp so I just ran everything but the steepest climbs. I power hiked the last 300 vert climb that rose up in .3 miles which is a cruel joke at 19 miles into a run. Steep, but over quickly.

    Then, finally, the descent back down to the bridge. 1100 feet straight down to the water and the lights of the city peaking out behind old growth pine. Across the down trees, scrambling out and finally back to the edge of the bridge. I was proud of the miles I ran across the bridge and back down to the house. 24 miles across the trail with 3,255 vert gained. Training.

  19. #119
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    May 2004
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    Fort Front Range
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    1,569
    Good story telling always beats a good story poorly told.
    In with the 9.

  20. #120
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    Aug 2013
    Location
    An Anheuser-Busch Barley Field
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    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    Awesome. We lived in DC (a very very snow-adverse city), on a major road (Wisconsin Avenue) on the 5th floor with a perfect view of the road as it came down the hill from where it meets River Rd. Ice storm equalled amazing total carnage. I'll never forget the bus that got sideways and wrecked every. single. car. on both sides of the road as it slid down the hill. He was hitting cars on one side with the front of the bus and the other side with the rear. And then he kept going when it got to the bottom. Just said fuckit and hit the gas. I actually called Metro to tell them about it, it was truly ridiculous how much damage was done. But i never heard back. Hey I tried.
    haha. reminds me of this video. minimal amount of carnage but the fact he kept going in plain sight is hilarious.


  21. #121
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    Oct 2003
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    写道
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    12,970
    Training for what, Odin? 50M, 100K, 100M...
    Daniel Ortega eats here.

  22. #122
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    Apr 2004
    Location
    Southeast New York
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    8,806
    Quote Originally Posted by BFD View Post
    had a get together with my fishing group big easter brunch and birthday party. Heard a great story about our ski area Mt Eyak. It is the original sun valley single chair. oldest chairlift in existence. In 1984 they wanted to change the electric motor at the top and repower to the bottom station. mike oleary https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...dova+avalanche
    and another local who had built their homes out of pocket took out mortgages to finance the repower.
    When I lived in Cordova in the summer of '89 the guy that I worked for, Bobby, told me that his dad and some friends were the ones that got the ski area up and running. Sounds like it was quite the adventure getting that old lift up there from ID and then dragging all the bits up the hill and reassembling it was a herculean effort. I also heard that he shot himself in the head a few years ago after going somewhat nutty.

  23. #123
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    May 2008
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    soaring on the shitwinds
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    I slept in today.

    That's way bigger news than it sounds, it's been a while.
    "If you limit your choices only to what seems possible or reasonable, you disconnect yourself from what you truly want, and all that is left is a compromise." -Robert Fritz

    Quote Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post
    not enough nun fisters in that community

  24. #124
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    Feb 2006
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    New England
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Screw the net, Surf the backcountry!

  25. #125
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmillsSkier View Post
    Is the Ox an animal or bar?

    Prizes depndant.
    It's more of an institution.
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

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