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  1. #1
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    Sep 2010
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    Best all terrain tires for 2015 Subaru Outback.

    I have a 2015 Subaru Outback on which I put Yokohama Geolander A/T-S tires on 225/65/17. Love the look and performance. Experienced great gas mileage (mixed 29mph, Hwy 31mph). My only complaint is that at 32,000 miles the tires are getting worn out and have 4/32" tread left. I am surprised and a little disappointed that they did not last longer. This tire new has 12/32".

    Me - live in SLC and drive the canyons several times a week to ski in the winter, climb in the summer. I do a fair amount of Hwy miles and need to access off-road destinations for remote climbing and mtn biking. I would rather error on having a beefier tire than run into problems in remote areas. I would also like to just have a single set of tires to use in all seasons.

    I am considering the Yokohama Geolander A/T - G015 as a replacement. Compared to the A/T-S's 50,000 mile rating the new G015 is a 60,000 mile rating and is supposed to be longer lasting. Any personal experience or other suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Additionally, any good tips on how to deal with carrying a full-size spare? It does not fit into the storage compartment. I have read that some folks use a deflated full-size which will fit and then carry a compressor. Thoughts? Experience?

    Thank you!
    -Nat

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    11,467
    32k out of a tire is pretty damn good.

    Firestone destination at's are another great choice for that vehicle.

    As for the spare, check that bitch. (Haven't heard that one in a while, we're getting old and slipping.)

  3. #3
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    We're planning to go G015 on our 2016 Outback. It seems like a great tire, but I haven't personally used it yet. You could also try the K02 in a 225/65 R17, but it's much heavier and aggressive. Both the G015 and K02 have the severe snowflake rating.

    Quote Originally Posted by NShultz View Post
    Additionally, any good tips on how to deal with carrying a full-size spare? It does not fit into the storage compartment. I have read that some folks use a deflated full-size which will fit and then carry a compressor. Thoughts? Experience?
    Doesn't it fit without the foam insert? I was hoping to throw a full-size spare in there, but I haven't checked the fit yet. Would suck to have to deflate and carry a compressor, but if that's the only option...
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  4. #4
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    ^^^Thanks for the advice. I pulled off one of the front wheels today (stock 225/65/17) with my Geolanders A/T-S at 4/32" tread and it would not fit into the spare tire recess( even with the foam insert removed). The spare tire is quite a bit smaller. I also just searched the Subaru forms again and read that folks are NOT able to fit a full size in the recessed area - even if deflated. Again, I am talking specifically about the 2015+ Outback. Appreciate the feedback. Keep it coming!

  5. #5
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    Sep 2010
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    I've looked into the BF Goodrich T/A KO2 a bunch (I've owned several sets of AT KO's for my Tacoma) and the weight increase is significant. The Geolander A/T G015 in 225/65/17 are 30lbs and the K02's are 39lbs. Any ideas on how much that would effect mpg?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NShultz View Post
    I pulled off one of the front wheels today (stock 225/65/17) with my Geolanders A/T-S at 4/32" tread and it would not fit into the spare tire recess( even with the foam insert removed).
    Bummer! It's pretty absurd that the donut is only good for 50 miles, and then they don't even design the car to fit a full-size spare. I thought I read on one of the forums that it would fit, but I just re-read and it was some guy with a Gen 4 (2012) Outback posting in the Gen 5 thread. Arg. But my wife punctured a snow tire and was able to fit the blown tire where the spare goes, so it *might* fit if you deflate it quite a bit...?

    No idea on KO2 vs G015 gas mileage. I figure it's never gonna be a truck no matter what you do to it, so the K02 is probably overkill. But plenty of people go up to 245/65R17 K02s, so whatever floats your boat, I guess. One advantage is the K02 is LT-rated while the G015 is P-rated (in 225/65 and 235/65R17). So the K02 is probably safer if you're planning to air down on trails.

    I'm pretty sure the G015 and K02 are the only two A/T tires with the "severe snowflake" rating that come in 225/65R17 or 235/65R17. I know the Outback of Doom guy likes the Atturo Trailblade XT, but it's not snowflake rated (not sure if it matters to you). While it would open up a few more options, I'm not comfortable sizing up to 245/65R17 because of the tight clearance of the strut...plus, I had hoped to fit a full-size spare where the donut spare goes and 245/65R17 definitely won't fit.

    Hopefully someone with actual experience running these tires on this car can chime in.
    Last edited by auvgeek; 01-23-2017 at 08:32 AM.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  7. #7
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    Nov 2010
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    Running the G015 on the wife's Rav4 currently in 225/65R17. Have about 12K on them so far and have been very happy with them. Can't speak to wear at this point but they have been great in the snow. On par with general grabber AT2s and maybe better than Cooper AT3s but all 3 are on different rigs so hard to compare.

  8. #8
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    What happened to the T100?
    Quote Originally Posted by Ernest_Hemingway View Post
    I realize there is not much hope for a bullfighting forum. I understand that most of you would prefer to discuss the ingredients of jacket fabrics than the ingredients of a brave man. I know nothing of the former. But the latter is made of courage, and skill, and grace in the presence of the possibility of death. If someone could make a jacket of those three things it would no doubt be the most popular and prized item in all of your closets.

  9. #9
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    Sep 2010
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    I loved my 2002 Tacoma. With this flight nursing job I end up driving a fair amount to the base(s) that I work at so I sold the Tacoma at 187,000 miles (still running like new) and got this 2015 Outback new off the lot a couple years ago. The outback is great to drive and milage is much better. 28 in town, 31 hwy. Usually I get 30/31 per tank. I do miss having a vehicle that I know will take me anywhere I want to go tho. Another Tacoma might be in future in another year or two....

    Tire-wise: I just got a new pair of Geolander A/T G015 225/65R/17 installed today. I spent a bunch of time with the folks at discount tire and the largest full size rim/tire you can fit into the storage space is 215/60R/17. We tried every other larger size. This size is essentially the same height as the provided spare donut but it's a real tire and much wider. You still wouldn't want to go more than 50 miles or so since the tire size is different and that will harm the transmission. You could do a 225/60R/17 if you deflated it. With either size - you won't be able to use the included foam insert that holds the included tire change tools.

    Anyone know if you can pull the fuse (like in the older models) and effectively turn off the awd - making it a 2-wd if you had to drive more than 50 miles on the space tire size?

  10. #10
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    Jun 2006
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    Heh. The truck I'm remembering from SCU must've been *two* cars ago then.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ernest_Hemingway View Post
    I realize there is not much hope for a bullfighting forum. I understand that most of you would prefer to discuss the ingredients of jacket fabrics than the ingredients of a brave man. I know nothing of the former. But the latter is made of courage, and skill, and grace in the presence of the possibility of death. If someone could make a jacket of those three things it would no doubt be the most popular and prized item in all of your closets.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by NShultz View Post
    I spent a bunch of time with the folks at discount tire and the largest full size rim/tire you can fit into the storage space is 215/60R/17. We tried every other larger size. This size is essentially the same height as the provided spare donut but it's a real tire and much wider. You still wouldn't want to go more than 50 miles or so since the tire size is different and that will harm the transmission. You could do a 225/60R/17 if you deflated it. With either size - you won't be able to use the included foam insert that holds the included tire change tools.
    Wow, that's really frustrating—especially since it wouldn't have cost them any more to make it work just fine. Apparently the Australian Gen 5 Outbacks have a full-size spare.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  12. #12
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    Aug 2013
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    Western MT
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    Please re-title thread to "why didn't I just buy a truck?" I keed, I keed....

  13. #13
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    May 2018
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    Subaru outback with rim 225 60r18

    I am thinking to change my original tire using the rim for 225 60r18 and buy the GEOLANDAR A/T G015 - SIZE: 235/60R18, but when I check on the supplier website, it is hard to find they are fit, but when I ask on the subaru forum, people say it is ok, can someone help?
    my subaru outback is 2015 limited with the wheel 225 60r18
    thanks.

  14. #14
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    Apr 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by avengine View Post
    I am thinking to change my original tire using the rim for 225 60r18 and buy the GEOLANDAR A/T G015 - SIZE: 235/60R18, but when I check on the supplier website, it is hard to find they are fit, but when I ask on the subaru forum, people say it is ok, can someone help?
    my subaru outback is 2015 limited with the wheel 225 60r18
    thanks.
    Tire rack has a fit calculator and it tells your u alternate sizes that will work
    I need to go to Utah.
    Utah?
    Yeah, Utah. It's wedged in between Wyoming and Nevada. You've seen pictures of it, right?

    So after 15 years we finally made it to Utah.....


    Thanks BCSAR and POWMOW Ski Patrol for rescues

    8, 17, 13, 18, 16, 18, 20, 19, 16

    2018/2019 (24/32)

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by whyturn View Post
    Tire rack has a fit calculator and it tells your u alternate sizes that will work
    I like this one for tire comparison
    https://www.tacomaworld.com/tirecalc

  16. #16
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    Oct 2016
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    tahoe de chingao
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    Just to chime in - probably a good call on the geolanders.

    I've had ko2's on a 2.5 forester, and they are probably too heavy. There is a noticeable difference in acceleration, even compared to tires of the same diameter. That said, the full time 50/50 awd plus ko2's literally got me up a 20% grade of mud the day after a storm. Begs the question, though, why didn't we drive the tacoma that day....

  17. #17
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    Conti pro contact... if you have a torsen center diff

  18. #18
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    Dec 2006
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
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    356
    I had a really good experience with a set of Toyo Open Country AT IIs on my AWD Honda Element. Those puppies lasted something like 50k or 75k miles in just about every condition imaginable.

  19. #19
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    Mar 2012
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    In spite of all the testimony here above I'm going to differ here. Unless you're talking about a true hybrid, no A/T tire is all that great on snow or ice. The cool looking knobby, gnarly, bad assed looking tread tires suck in the snow. You want a much tighter, thinner pattern with lots of siping cuts for snow and ice.

    Coming from someone with 40 years driving on and off road, winter and mud conditions. There are newer hybrids that kick ass in snow, but a standard A/T will be worse than a standard no season on ice..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  20. #20
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    Sep 2010
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    The G015 and KO2 are both the 3PMSF-rated. Not nearly as good as a top-performing snow tire (studded or studless), especially on ice, but much better than your average AT. At least, that’s been my experience with the G015, which I own and have driven in the snow a fair amount. We run G015 for 3-seasons and Hakka 8 studded for winter, but CO was so dry this winter we never bothered switching. For others, a better compromise might be a studless snow and a highway tire. But for people who want to run one tire all year and spent some time on fire roads, the G015 seems pretty decent.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  21. #21
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    Apr 2007
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    Bethel, Maine
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    577
    Quote Originally Posted by auvgeek View Post
    The G015 and KO2 are both the 3PMSF-rated. Not nearly as good as a top-performing snow tire (studded or studless), especially on ice, but much better than your average AT. At least, that’s been my experience with the G015, which I own and have driven in the snow a fair amount. We run G015 for 3-seasons and Hakka 8 studded for winter, but CO was so dry this winter we never bothered switching. For others, a better compromise might be a studless snow and a highway tire. But for people who want to run one tire all year and spent some time on fire roads, the G015 seems pretty decent.
    Interestingly, Canadian Tire's testing rated both the Duratrac and the KO2 as better than the General Arctic LT on ice. c.f. http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/automo...fr#truck-tires; sadly, Nokians were not in the test, and the General was the only dedicated winter tire in the A/T range shown in the results.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by anotherVTskibum View Post
    Interestingly, Canadian Tire's testing rated both the Duratrac and the KO2 as better than the General Arctic LT on ice. c.f. http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/automo...fr#truck-tires; sadly, Nokians were not in the test, and the General was the only dedicated winter tire in the A/T range shown in the results.
    Eh, I believe it...but I also don't put much stock in it as a true test of tires on ice. "100%" doesn't tell me much.

    Lots of discussion on this here: https://www.tetongravity.com/forums/...ighlight=tires

    This is probably the newest/best tire test I've seen (goggle translate to english or whatever your native language is): https://www.motor.no/artikler/2017/o...g-pa-glatt-is/

    Here's an older, but more easily digestible (aka in english and a single pdf) test: http://www.brunowessel.com/content/p...d_r_review.pdf

    If you look at the raw data from these tests, the top 2-3 modern, factory-studded tires perform significantly better on ice, marginally better on snow, about the same on wet pavement, and marginally worse on dry pavement compared to the top 2-3 studless tires. Personally, I think the ice performance outweighs the minimal drawbacks on dry pavement because it's SO much better. We're talking about stopping 20m shorter on ice vs <1m longer on dry pavement. Eyeballing the overall tests (I haven't graphed it or anything), it's pretty clear to me that performance on snow or ice is directly inverse to performance on wet or dry pavement, regardless of whether the tire is studded or studless. It's just not possible (yet) to have a tire that performs very well on bare pavement and snow/ice. It's like wanting a ski that's damp enough for charging inbounds and light enough for big touring days.

    But you also have to factor in that these tests are run when the tires are brand new -- nonlinear tire wear isn't taken into account. This can be significant for tires like Blizzak, which have a dual compound and are worthless after your wear out the soft/sticky outer rubber, or potentially studs, which might be way better until the stud tips are worn. Without a test re-run with significant miles on each tire, we have only anecdotal experience of how different tires wear.

    Sadly, none of those tests include the modern crop of "all-weather" tires with the 3PMSF rating, like the BFG K02, G015, Cooper ATW, Hankook ATM, etc.

    And obviously there's the question of how well these tests correspond to real-world driving conditions. I think braking and corning data in a controlled environment are important and better than anecdotal data, but YMMV.

    Finally, if you're going to run all-weather tires year round, you also have to consider if you'll replace the tires when the tread gets dangerous for winter conditions, which is generally earlier than you would for a dedicated summer tire. If you're going to run a studded winter tires, you have to consider when your state makes them illegal (sometimes as early as April 1) and whether your "summer" tires can handle April or May snow storms.
    Last edited by auvgeek; 06-27-2018 at 10:24 AM.
    "Alpine rock and steep, deep powder are what I seek, and I will always find solace there." - Bean Bowers

    photos

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Ottawa
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    Here's a solution to the full-size spare not fitting: https://www.wilcooffroad.com/shop/hitchgate-solo/

    Also, for any Subaru guys that have heard of Lachute Performance, they now have an adventure side: https://lpaventure.com/

    Here's a 2018 Outback with some of their kit: https://lpaventure.com/blogs/project...u-outback-3-6r
    Quote Originally Posted by jlboyell View Post
    Climate change deniers should be in the same boat as the flat earthers, ridiculed for stupidity.

  24. #24
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    Aug 2006
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    Weve been happy with the geo lander AT severe snow rated tires on our fwd minivan. Only used it a few times this last winter on cold slick roads. We usually switch to blizzaks for winter. Not sure if those come in the right size for the 2015 outback, but Id consider them for my subi.

    For my subi, weve gotten into a groove where I run several extended seasons on general arctic snows. This tire sees a lot of time storm chasing in Tahoe but also dry/wet paved and grave roads. When the tread is low after a few winters, they become my summer tire for the next several summers. I run them in summer and buy fresh snows for the next winter. This has been going on for 4 years now.

  25. #25
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    Aug 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnyg82 View Post
    Here's a 2018 Outback with some of their kit: https://lpaventure.com/blogs/project...u-outback-3-6r
    Ive seen a few subis dresses like this in my area, but they all seem to have burlier looking front bumpers. I think one has sliders, too.

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