Page 23 of 31 FirstFirst ... 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 ... LastLast
Results 551 to 575 of 754

Thread: Truck Tire Time

  1. #551
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Hankook Dynapro ATM is a good tire, snowflake rated, good/great in snow, reasonably quiet for an AT tire and reasonably priced. I like them as much as the Duratracs I had before.
    Several years later....does this still apply @magnificentunicorn?

  2. #552
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    PRB
    Posts
    23,184
    Those are what I bought recently, so far I like them
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin
    "I'd eat a bag of Dicks and wash it down with a Coke any day." - iceman

  3. #553
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    14,098
    Same here, had them on my old Nissan, and put them on my new one.

  4. #554
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    5,716
    Quote Originally Posted by shredgnar View Post
    Got a couple chucks taken out of my BFG KO2 tire sidewall recently. Still driving on it, but kinda worried. they are maybe 1/8" deep.
    If it didn't cut any internal threads, I wouldn't give it a second thought. If you do a lot of rock crawling and another rock caught the same spot, if could tear a bit more easily, but that's a slim chance.

    Run it.

  5. #555
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sandy
    Posts
    2,048
    Has anyone ran the new General Grabber A/TX through a winter and have feedback on how they do? I'm putting new tires on my F150 this fall and these are the frontrunner. I ran the old General AT2s on my old montero and they kicked ass in the snow, so I'm inclined to think the ATXs will be solid as well. I commute in the SLC valley and drive LCC 3-4x per week all winter. Not interested in running dedicated snows on this rig. I do carry a set of chains just in case though.

    Other tires in the running are:

    Falken AT3W- do they have full depth siping? The old Wildcat ATs did not.

    Duratrac- have drove a few different rigs with them over the years, but more aggressive than I need and may be lacking in hardpack/ice performance?

    BFG KO2- Grabber AT2s seemed better in the snow to me but I've never ran them on the same rig. Also, $$

    Cooper ATW- ran AT3s on my F250 and they were kind of lacking on hardpack/ice.

  6. #556
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Southside of heaven
    Posts
    3,037
    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    Cooper ATW- ran AT3s on my F250 and they were kind of lacking on hardpack/ice.
    I have been running Cooper ATWs on my 3rd gen 4runner for 2 winters now and have had been pleased with both their dry pavement and snow performance. It looks like Cooper replaced them with the AT3 4s though: http://us.coopertire.com/tires/discoverer-at3-4s

  7. #557
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    5,213
    Website still has the atw http://us.coopertire.com/tires/discoverer-a-tw-suv

    Itís a pretty different tire compared to the original at3.

  8. #558
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Western MT
    Posts
    1,599
    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    Falken AT3W- do they have full depth siping? The old Wildcat ATs did not.
    Yes, full depth but does not run across the entire lug like some of the other options out there. IMO they are great in snow, mud, anything loose/soft but not very good on ice. The rubber is holding up very well after 2 years, probably why they aren't great on ice, along with siping that doesn't extend across the entire lug. Bearable with 4wd though.

  9. #559
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    378
    FYI I just got some Cooper AT3 4S (P metric) installed on my 4Runner. Old tires were Yoko Geolandar g015. The Coopers are really nice. Burly mugs and probably the thickest sidewall you can get in a p-metric tire. Rides stiffer than most but not the rock hard ride of an LT on this SUV. Off road they handle great. Can’t wait til the snow flies!

  10. #560
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    167
    OK I'll chime in. I don't have a truck but I do have BFG K02s on my 2015 Subaru Outback. Size is 245/65-17. These tires have excellent snow performance. I had several trips last season over Donner Summit with several inches of snow on the road. No drama, just lots of grip. Same thing when the snow was close to a foot deep going up into the TD neighborhood side roads.

    This summer I've been doing lots of camping trips with my two boys who are both in Scouts. Their troop likes to go remote which means several miles down dirt roads, fire roads, BLM roads, etc. Again, lots of grip and stability even when the conditions are a bit loose. Even when the tires do break loose and slide, it is predictable and easy to bring back. Very nice.

    These tires are very sturdy and as a result are a bit heavy. Road noise is apparent on the highway and MPGs are reduced slightly. Admittedly, these tires may be overkill for my Outback, but I do appreciate how capable they are so I don't mind. I've had them on for over 20K miles and they are wearing nicely. I definitely plan to get another set when these wear out.

  11. #561
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,104
    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    Cooper ATW- ran AT3s on my F250 and they were kind of lacking on hardpack/ice.
    I have a 4th gen 4runner and have had ATWs for about 18 months now. I think they are a pretty perfect tire for the driving that i do which is on pavement 98% of the time, and only the last 10-20 miles on snow or ice. If the road is open to traffic, i have no worries that i will be safe and in control (as long as im not rallying around like an asshat). When Snowmagedon hit seattle last year, i was fine getting into and out of my condo complex through 12-15 inches of slush up/down the 18% driveway, and driving around the unplowed steep streets around my office. The grip is mediocre on ice or wet and clear hardpack snow, but is totally manageable and expected for a non-winter/studded tire. I havent had any issues on longer roadtrips where im driving 100s of miles on snow/ice covered roads either. The size i got is thinner than my previous set of tires and that actually is quite a noticable positive in that i dont get grabbed and tossed around by pavement/snow grooves nearly as much. I also used to have bad issues hydroplaning in heavy downpours or getting grabbed by puddles on the highway, but those problems have pretty much stopped with the ATWs.

    The wear on the tires is noticable after about 25k, but I fully expect to get 50k out of these before binning them. I think they are a very good option for a non-winter tire with a focus on winter driving.

  12. #562
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,104
    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    I have a 4th gen 4runner and have had ATWs for about 18 months now. I think they are a pretty perfect tire for the driving that i do which is on pavement 98% of the time, and only the last 10-20 miles on snow or ice. If the road is open to traffic, i have no worries that i will be safe and in control (as long as im not rallying around like an asshat). When Snowmagedon hit seattle last year, i was fine getting into and out of my condo complex through 12-15 inches of slush up/down the 18% driveway, and driving around the unplowed steep streets around my office. The grip is mediocre on ice or wet and clear hardpack snow, but is totally manageable and expected for a non-winter/studded tire. I havent had any issues on longer roadtrips where im driving 100s of miles on snow/ice covered roads either. The size i got is thinner than my previous set of tires and that actually is quite a noticable positive in that i dont get grabbed and tossed around by pavement/snow grooves nearly as much. I also used to have bad issues hydroplaning in heavy downpours or getting grabbed by puddles on the highway, but those problems have pretty much stopped with the ATWs.

    The wear on the tires is noticable after about 25k, but I fully expect to get 50k out of these before binning them. I think they are a very good option for a non-winter tire with a focus on winter driving.
    Also, FWIW, the ATW is rated for only 50k, while the new AT3 4S is rated for 65k. To me, that says that the rubber is softer on the ATW, meaning that it will grip ice and snow much better. YMMV.

  13. #563
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    31,218
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamburello Rouge View Post
    these tires may be overkill for my Outback.
    maybe?
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  14. #564
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    8,644
    I've been a Cooper guy for a long time. My new Tundra came with Michelin LTX AT2s. They don't look cool. I thought I would replace them with something soon. After 10k miles, I'd buy these again when they wear out. 60k warranty too. Wearing great, good on ice, snow, dirt, much, quiet on pavement. The only thing I don't like is the looks. Plus, all the dudes buying new Tundras are selling take-offs cheap on craigslist.

  15. #565
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sandy
    Posts
    2,048
    Good feedback all. I've historically been a Cooper fan as well and they are based close to my hometown. I like the idea of the ATWs but I'm a little squeamish about the softer compound since it gets so damn hot here in the summer. Guess they have a tread warranty though so...

  16. #566
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,104
    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    Good feedback all. I've historically been a Cooper fan as well and they are based close to my hometown. I like the idea of the ATWs but I'm a little squeamish about the softer compound since it gets so damn hot here in the summer. Guess they have a tread warranty though so...
    My opinion: I had to take a hard look at how much i actually drive on snow vs pavement. The reality is, unless you live IN the mountains you will be driving on pavement the large majority of the time, even in SLC during the winter (streets get plowed and salted pretty quickly). If you are driving on snow/ice for a large portion of the time during winter, it would be smart to get a dedicated winter set of tires. But, if driving on snow/ice is not an everyday thing, then you probably want to get an "all season" type tire. If you decide on an "all season" type tire you then need to decide how much emphasis you want to place on winter driving... for me, the whole reason i moved to my adopted home state is to ski, so i place a very large emphasis on it and want to be comfortable driving on any road condition where the road is open. That said, you can easily get away with some pretty shitty tires if you have AWD/4WD and stay VERY aware of your grip and stopping distance... but it sucks to drive like that and if you do drive enough in the snow/ice you will eventually become complacent and fuck up. That is where you want that softer, quicker wearing tire with more sipes- to get your ass out of trouble when you do have that momentary lapse.

    For me personally, i am happy to change my tires out 1 year earlier than i would otherwise if it gives me that little safety cushion a handful of times per year. The hassle, plus missed powder day/vacation, and dangerous as fuck situations sitting on the side of a snowy highway waiting for a tow is not worth the 1 year of tire wear i would have saved by going with a longer wearing tire. My car is a 15 year old 4runner that is long since paid off and the general maintenance is super low so i am fine paying a little extra for some extra grip. I also dont take long road trips (300+ miles) more than 5-6 times per year so effeciency isnt a huge concern either. But, everyones situation is different, and as always, YMMV.

  17. #567
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the ham
    Posts
    7,816
    ...or if you never go off road (gravel, forest roads, etc don't count), you're better off with "touring"/highway summers, and dedicated snows - preferably on separate rims.

    Any tire marketed for year-round use has design compromises.

  18. #568
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    6,396
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Striker View Post
    ...or if you never go off road (gravel, forest roads, etc don't count), you're better off with "touring"/highway summers
    Better of compared to what? Super Swampers? Full-on mud tires? I agree. But given that this is the truck tire thread, a good all terrain tire makes more sense for summer rubber than something highway biased.

    Touring tires belong on crossovers, not trucks.
    I remember a bottomless freedom...

  19. #569
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sandy
    Posts
    2,048
    Quote Originally Posted by glademaster View Post
    Better of compared to what? Super Swampers? Full-on mud tires? I agree. But given that this is the truck tire thread, a good all terrain tire makes more sense for summer rubber than something highway biased.

    Touring tires belong on crossovers, not trucks.
    Yup. I own a truck because I use it. Good A/Ts have been working since I moved to CO 10 years ago and I'll keep it that way. Spend too much time on dry pavement in SLC for dedicated snows too.

  20. #570
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    6,396
    I run a 3PMSF rated AT as my summer tire and either Blizzaks or Hakkapelittas in the winter, because I'm neurotic about tires.

    Dedicated snows provide better grip on cold dry and cold wet pavement than even a 3PMSF rated all season, they aren't just for driving on packed snow.
    I remember a bottomless freedom...

  21. #571
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    NCW
    Posts
    2,532
    Anyone tried the Toyo m55 on a diesel 250/350? Duratracs are shot after 2.5 yrs and about 25k. The Toyo open country at2 (285/75r18) and Hankook dynapro at/m are also in the running.

    Hoping to find a tire with good snow/ice performance and more longevity if possible.

  22. #572
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the ham
    Posts
    7,816
    Quote Originally Posted by glademaster View Post
    Touring tires belong on crossovers, not trucks.
    My post was aimed at the guy who never gets off the pavement. And when I said better off I meant better handling, braking, and gas mileage. And dedicated snows are indisputably better than all the cake-and-eat-it-too bullshit.

    And when I said touring/highway, I'm including that LTX that comes OEM on a lot of trucks right now (even if it says a/t on the sidewall).

  23. #573
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    5,213
    My mechanic considers the cooper atw to be a highway tire.

  24. #574
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,104
    Quote Originally Posted by bodywhomper View Post
    My mechanic considers the cooper atw to be a highway tire.
    That is correct. It is most definitely not a winter tire, nor an offroading tire.

  25. #575
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    447
    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    Yup. I own a truck because I use it. Good A/Ts have been working since I moved to CO 10 years ago and I'll keep it that way. Spend too much time on dry pavement in SLC for dedicated snows too.
    This last winter was the first time I used a set of winter tires. Cooper M+S, no studs, cuz SLC. Did great going up and down the canyons, barely wore at all-probably put 7000 miles on em, better than new duratracs or Grabber AT3s on ice. Anyway, for someone who uses a truck off-road, it's worth switching tires, cuz aggressive driving on dirt and rock destroys tires. My duratracs have 15-20k miles on them and really suck in wet or snowy anything at this point, but still get it done on trails. 20-30k is all I've gotten out of any all terrain truck tire, so not saying the duratracs wear too fast. In the meantime, the Cooper's still have perfect sipes, sharp corners on the treadblocks, basically just lost a tiny bit of tread depth. I didn't drive in dirt much with them, and when I did was much more gentle than usual unless it was absolutely necessary to rally and not get stuck.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •