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Thread: Climate Change

  1. #751
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    Last edited by teamdirt; 08-03-2022 at 02:50 AM.

  2. #752
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    Interesting post by our local PNW weather guru Cliff Mass. Explains how in Washington, we have positioned our wind turbines in areas that are the most windy throughout the year (East slope of the Cascades), but also the least windy during times of extreme heat and extreme cold (the exact moments when electricity demand is at it highest point). We need to diversify our wind turbine locations (more on the open ocean, where it is almost always windy). Probably holds true in other parts of the West.

    https://cliffmass.blogspot.com/2022/...ring.html?lr=1

  3. #753
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    I missed this eruption

    https://www.npr.org/2022/08/03/11153...=135&utm_att1=

    Tonga's volcano sent tons of water into the stratosphere. That could warm the Earth

  4. #754
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2skier112 View Post
    I missed this eruption

    https://www.npr.org/2022/08/03/11153...=135&utm_att1=

    Tonga's volcano sent tons of water into the stratosphere. That could warm the Earth
    Well thatís just great, now the earth is warming herself.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  5. #755
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    Quote Originally Posted by altasnob View Post
    Interesting post by our local PNW weather guru Cliff Mass. Explains how in Washington, we have positioned our wind turbines in areas that are the most windy throughout the year (East slope of the Cascades), but also the least windy during times of extreme heat and extreme cold (the exact moments when electricity demand is at it highest point). We need to diversify our wind turbine locations (more on the open ocean, where it is almost always windy). Probably holds true in other parts of the West.

    https://cliffmass.blogspot.com/2022/...ring.html?lr=1

    Its almost like they put them in the least efficient areas as well as far away from any populated areas to avoid ruining scenic views.

    NIMBY at its best

  6. #756
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    Itís been pretty easy to see the rapid retreat of our small glacier over twenty years. I was still shocked to hear on the radio itís got ten to fifteen years before it goes. Iím gonna have to go visit it this summer.

  7. #757
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmguy View Post
    Its almost like they put them in the least efficient areas as well as far away from any populated areas to avoid ruining scenic views.

    NIMBY at its best
    Depends. If the purpose of the wind turbines is to meet peak demand, then yeah. If the idea is to generate base demand then the siting makes sense.
    But on one gets attention for their blog saying that the folks in charge did something right.

  8. #758
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    And keep in mind: a primary characteristic of a heat wave is ..... no wind pretty much any where. That's why it suddenly gets hotter than normal.

  9. #759
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    What about Santa Anas? (While the air mass in not particularly hot, the high downslope winds heat the air by compressing it.)

  10. #760
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    Fair point, but then you've the equivalent of this - https://www.wcax.com/2022/07/26/vira...fwsMs3ZmNErUgo

  11. #761
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  12. #762
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    I assume sea turtles from not Florida can also mate with these turtles? Some boy turtles are going to have to get busy impregnating all the females from FloridaÖ

  13. #763
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    Wildfire: Look at how much Iím messing with California.

    Ark flood: Hold my beerÖ

    For an interesting mash up of metal, the USGS, and California getting hosed.

    https://www.usgs.gov/programs/scienc...nario#overview

  14. #764
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blaster View Post
    Wildfire: Look at how much I’m messing with California.

    Ark flood: Hold my beer…

    For an interesting mash up of metal, the USGS, and California getting hosed.

    https://www.usgs.gov/programs/scienc...nario#overview
    Oh great, another excuse for Palisades not to get the lifts open.

  15. #765
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    I recently was told about the 1950 Central Valley floods, it is a bit interesting to see the chart using the most extreme events observed historically since 1951.
    I have a great uncle who I want to talk to about those floods since I hadn't heard about them before.
    https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/wsp1137F


    Another interesting note that I've seen shared around recently. Spruce crossed the Brooks range and are spreading afaster than expected into the Arctic tundra.
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-022-05093-2

    Abstract
    Unprecedented modern rates of warming are expected to advance boreal forest into Arctic tundra, thereby reducing albedo, altering carbon cycling and further changing climate, yet the patterns and processes of this biome shift remain unclear. Climate warming, required for previous boreal advances, is not sufficient by itself for modern range expansion of conifers forming forest–tundra ecotones. No high-latitude population of conifers, the dominant North American Arctic treeline taxon, has previously been documented advancing at rates following the last glacial maximum (LGM). Here we describe a population of white spruce (Picea glauca) advancing at post-LGM rates across an Arctic basin distant from established treelines and provide evidence of mechanisms sustaining the advance. The population doubles each decade, with exponential radial growth in the main stems of individual trees correlating positively with July air temperature. Lateral branches in adults and terminal leaders in large juveniles grow almost twice as fast as those at established treelines. We conclude that surpassing temperature thresholds, together with winter winds facilitating long-distance dispersal, deeper snowpack and increased soil nutrient availability promoting recruitment and growth, provides sufficient conditions for boreal forest advance. These observations enable forecast modelling with important insights into the environmental conditions converting tundra into forest.

    .....

    We describe a large, expanding population of young, vigorous, sexually reproducing spruce, thriving within an Arctic watershed previously unoccupied by spruce for millennia and advancing at rates approaching post-LGM migration out of glacial refugia. Using satellite imagery (Fig. 1 and Supplementary Figs. 1−13) and field campaigns (Supplementary Fig. 14), we document white spruce dispersal over Alaska’s Brooks Range, a 1,000-km Arctic mountain range (Fig. 1a) long considered a barrier to forest advance. The oldest trees appear to have colonized during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by dispersing over a mountainous divide from established treelines in a basin supporting spruce for 6,000 years. Our observations suggest that winter winds, deep snow and greater nutrient availability provide for rapid individual and exponential population growth, propelling the population northwards at >4 km per decade, faster than for all modern conifer treelines previously measured. These environmental factors are associated with rising temperatures and decreasing sea ice, highlighting interconnections between marine and terrestrial components in a rapidly changing Arctic.

  16. #766
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    Armadillos in NC and TN are cute. What's really gonna be fun is when our lakes and rivers are full of gators. Sorry folks, no more water skiing or beach days inland.
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  17. #767
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    Don't forget silver carp blunt force trauma.

  18. #768
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    Quote Originally Posted by SumJongGuy View Post
    Armadillos in NC and TN are cute. What's really gonna be fun is when our lakes and rivers are full of gators. Sorry folks, no more water skiing or beach days inland.
    I heard gators taste like chicken.
    "It's only steep if you're backseat"

  19. #769
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    Quote Originally Posted by AirheadD8 View Post
    I heard gators taste like chicken.
    So do people
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  20. #770
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    California GAS STOP O?

    California votes to ban new gas car sales by 2035

    I can hardly wait for the onion version of this..
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

  21. #771
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    It will be interesting to see if there is anything close to the amount of charging infrastructure to accommodate even the number of EV's targeted for 2026, let alone the 2035 version. Or anything close to the amount of clean electricity needed to charge them. As it is California's grid can barely keep up. Without massive public investment in charging and clean generation there won't be enough people buying new EV's and clean power to make a dent in CO2 emissions. I expect we'll see people hanging on to their gas cars and trucks, especially in rural areas--we'll be like Cuba. It has to happen, but relying on subsidies and the free market alone--as in the Inflation Reduction Act or setting a fleet standard and expecting the other pieces to magically fall into place--ala CA--isn't going to do it.

  22. #772
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    Quote Originally Posted by SumJongGuy View Post
    So do people
    Soylent Green .........Prophetic
    "It's only steep if you're backseat"

  23. #773
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    Anyone see the hotel in Pakistan get swept away in historic flooding? JFC

  24. #774
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    The Pakistan flooding is bonkers.

    The death toll is going to be massive.

  25. #775
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    Climate Change

    Quote Originally Posted by simple View Post
    The Pakistan flooding is bonkers.

    The death toll is going to be massive.
    A THIRD of the country is under water?! What is it going to take to get people VERY serious about limiting the effects of climate change/weirding/correction/whateverthefuck?

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