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Thread: Climate Change

  1. #1026
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    Quote Originally Posted by bodywhomper View Post
    Thin profit margin for investors to get a facility built and operating, so I’ve been told… and I believe that’s both of those types of biomass facility. I conflated the two (energy and H production). Sry
    Thanks for clarifying. Yeah, like everything else about fixing the climate crisis it's going to require subsidies. We pay now or we pay later.

  2. #1027
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    Article on co2 injection in California: https://mavensnotebook.com/2022/01/0...26373291015625[/QUOTE]

    Fracking ? Drilling wells ( using fossil fuel ) and injecting C02? Uggggg
    Plant trees if you want to sequester CO2 , some things don't need to be all that complicated .

    I live in a wooded area and it's consistently 6-12f cooler than the city I work in .
    "It's only steep if you're backseat"

  3. #1028
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    [QUOTE}

    Fracking ? Drilling wells ( using fossil fuel ) and injecting C02? Uggggg
    Plant trees if you want to sequester CO2 , some things don't need to be all that complicated .

    I live in a wooded area and it's consistently 6-12f cooler than the city I work in .[/QUOTE]

    We could just all drink more soda and sparkling water.

  4. #1029
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    not sure if this has been posted
    https://thehill.com/changing-america...nd-in-wyoming/

    not a word about trees in the article as a possible CO2 removal mechanism

  5. #1030
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    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    not sure if this has been posted
    https://thehill.com/changing-america...nd-in-wyoming/

    not a word about trees in the article as a possible CO2 removal mechanism
    Wouldnít it take a while for trees to get big enough to make much of a difference even with planting hundreds of thousands?


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  6. #1031
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Wouldn’t it take a while for trees to get big enough to make much of a difference even with planting hundreds of thousands?


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    yes, absolutely
    but that project ^^^ also hasn't broken ground

  7. #1032
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    Climate Change

    Why not both? Iím not sure what youíre getting at by bringing up trees with that link


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  8. #1033
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Why not both? I’m not sure what you’re getting at by bringing up trees with that link
    i was just surprised that there wasn't a benchmark to describe how effective this will be
    and trees struck me as our most obvious CO2 processors
    not criticizing the effort so apologies if that's how i made it sound
    "both and" strategy works for me for sure

  9. #1034
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    Best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. Second best time is today. As they say.

    Trees are great, so are other capture solutions, but the ocean is probably the best carbon sink if we can get the carbon into it.

  10. #1035
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    Underground carbon storage is going to be HUUUDDGE. I've read about other projects getting started in North Dakota. All those landowners around the Bakken who didn't own their land's mineral rights (or were outside the prime shale-oil play) could finally benefit financially because carbon storage is attached to the surface rights, not the mineral rights.

  11. #1036
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    This popped up the other day. What say all about this guy's reasoning? Interesting.

  12. #1037
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    Thatís ^^ pretty interesting. In some areas of California, thereís been a rush to get first in the queue for permits for underground carbon storage. Same will soon occur for offshore wind.

    Trees: in California, thereís almost 2M acres of federal land that was previous conifer forests that were recently destroyed in high severity wildfire. Thereís a bit of a conundrum about what to do next. Methods of reforestation may or may not be successful because of difficulty in implementing and maintaining the areas. Most of the discussion that I see revolves around previous lack by the federal government to successfully grow a forest and maintain it in such a way that it wonít be devastated by another high severity wildfire in 20-30 years. There are some success stories and many unsuccessful stories, but none at the scale of the current problem.

  13. #1038
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    A lot of places where forest has burned will never grow trees again, due to climate change.

  14. #1039
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    A lot of places where forest has burned will never grow trees again, due to climate change.
    I donít really think thatís true. We probably wonít notice the reforestation but the trees will grow. Everywhere that Iíve gone into thatís had very hot fires, everything burned to bare soil, has new trees growing after a few years.


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  15. #1040
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    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=IeyP439HLFs

    As long as the CO2 stays where they put it! Iím thinking try that experiment where no population exists!

    Not much profit planting trees. Poplar trees grow pretty quickly Iím sure thereís other varieties that do as well. They also give off oxygen so thereís that too.

    Sparkling water and soda have side effects on me, I can change CO2 into methane 😁
    "It's only steep if you're backseat"

  16. #1041
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    I don’t really think that’s true. We probably won’t notice the reforestation but the trees will grow. Everywhere that I’ve gone into that’s had very hot fires, everything burned to bare soil, has new trees growing after a few years.


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    Up your way sure. But the desert and the chaparral are moving north and uphill in California. Donner ridge burned in 1959 I believe. South facing slope that's still bare and eroded. I see the same thing in other burns around here. Plus, the bark beetle kills are increasing exponentially.

  17. #1042
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    I live on the east slopes. Itís dry. Desertification is real but if the trees are growing and healthy when the fire comes through theyíll come back, it just takes a little longer. Now if theyíre already dying or unhealthy from drought and disease then theyíre going to die anyway regardless of fire.


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  18. #1043
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    Climate Change

    My understanding is that forest regrowth in the western US after high severity fire (ie complete tree mortality in large areas) is dependent on the dominant species.

    There is some banter about it here: https://twitter.com/ucsierraforest/s...Rg1GMw_P8KJYYA

  19. #1044
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    Weíve had a few catastrophic wildfires here in central WA. Things that were a moonscape a few years back seem to have the usual progression of recovery species. Depending on the locale, new growth of shrubs is first apparent and then a couple years later trees start to appear. Mixed growth too, white bark mixed with larch, cedar and hemlock, aspen, lodge pole and pondos growing together.

    I think weíre impatient and canít get away from a human time scale


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  20. #1045
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    Isn't there anything we can do with CO2 besides store it under ground? Seriously, not talking about carbonated drinks here. I mean it's carbon and oxygen - two seemingly usable materials.

  21. #1046
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    Quote Originally Posted by PB View Post
    Isn't there anything we can do with CO2 besides store it under ground? Seriously, not talking about carbonated drinks here. I mean it's carbon and oxygen - two seemingly usable materials.
    Regenerative farming will soak it up. But itís too simple and effective to be adopted to a meaningful scale.

  22. #1047
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    Quote Originally Posted by PB View Post
    Isn't there anything we can do with CO2 besides store it under ground? Seriously, not talking about carbonated drinks here. I mean it's carbon and oxygen - two seemingly usable materials.
    This. Would be ideal if we could turn it into an inert building material, etc.

  23. #1048
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    https://www.conserve-energy-future.com/carbon-sinks.php

    Grasslands
    Agricultural Lands
    Northern, boreal forests
    Tropical Rainforests
    Peat Bogs
    Freshwater lakes and wetlands
    Coastal ecosystems such as seagrass beds, kelp forests, salt marshes and swamps
    Coral reefs

  24. #1049
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    We’ve had a few catastrophic wildfires here in central WA. Things that were a moonscape a few years back seem to have the usual progression of recovery species. Depending on the locale, new growth of shrubs is first apparent and then a couple years later trees start to appear. Mixed growth too, white bark mixed with larch, cedar and hemlock, aspen, lodge pole and pondos growing together.

    I think we’re impatient and can’t get away from a human time scale


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    https://www.cbc.ca/news/science/fore...ires-1.4444998

    "Bigger, hotter wildfires are ravaging forests and burning them to the ground more frequently as the climate gets hotter and drier. Now a new study shows that in some places in the U.S., those forests may never grow back."

  25. #1050
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagnificentUnicorn View Post
    Weíve had a few catastrophic wildfires here in central WA. Things that were a moonscape a few years back seem to have the usual progression of recovery species. Depending on the locale, new growth of shrubs is first apparent and then a couple years later trees start to appear. Mixed growth too, white bark mixed with larch, cedar and hemlock, aspen, lodge pole and pondos growing together.

    I think weíre impatient and canít get away from a human time scale


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    Here's a study on post-fire tree regrowth after 20 years: https://scholarworks.umt.edu/etd/11779/ in the Bitterroot range of Montana. I read this a while back and was reminded of it reading this thread.

    Conclusion:

    "Results suggest that study areas that were affected by high severity fire are unlikely to return to pre-fire conditions without tree planting or other management activities."

    There was another study earlier in the same area that suggested the same thing: that the more shaded northerly aspects will regrow just fine, but the higher temps caused by climate change affect the southerly aspects profoundly and those will never grow back without help.
    "Holy Cow!" someone exclaimed from the back of the stationwagon.

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