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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    In the swamp
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    Backpack recs for scrambling

    I'm wondering if anyone has recommendations for backpacks for scrambling class 3 terrain - for routes like Kelso Ridge on Torreys, the Sawtooth or Crestone Peak (in Colorado). Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Your Mom's House
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    6,359
    Any daypack that fits and allows you reasonably good freedom of movement. I like the 20-30L range personally (first aid kit, snacks, 3L water, rain jacket, light puffy, windshirt, beanie).

    Black Diamond has some packs that have some creative features to aid in freedom of movement, but they don't fit/carry well for me. Nitro 22 or 26 are worth a look.

    I personally carry a Gregory Z30 (it's small for a "30L" pack)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    truckee
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    10,821
    My favorite scrambling daypack is a simple nylon pack with a vertical center baffle. No padding or frame. Simple web straps and waist belt. Haul loop and ice ace loop. Fits like a glove, keeps the weight close to the body, super light for packing in a multi-day backpack or suitcase. Problem is, I made it myself. If anyone knows a commercial source I'd love to hear about it. Mine is worn out.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    West Shore
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    2,322
    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    My favorite scrambling daypack is a simple nylon pack with a vertical center baffle. No padding or frame. Simple web straps and waist belt. Haul loop and ice ace loop. Fits like a glove, keeps the weight close to the body, super light for packing in a multi-day backpack or suitcase. Problem is, I made it myself. If anyone knows a commercial source I'd love to hear about it. Mine is worn out.
    The Hyperlite Mountain Gear Summit Pack is just about what you're describing. Not the cheapest pack, but I've been quite happy with mine so far.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    412
    Lots of love for the REI Flash, 18l and 22l. pretty cheap and lightweight.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Sandy
    Posts
    4,814
    I love my Salomon S-Lab X Alp 20 , it's pretty simple and light and carries well + I like the clean exterior that doesn't hung up when you end up bushwhacking.
    When life gives you haters, make haterade.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Posts
    10,893
    Get what fits you and your gear. There are a lot of good packs out there - Arc'teryx, Osprey (I like my Variant), BD, Gregory, Deuter, etc, etc. - but if you try them on with a load, you'll probably find one that fits and carries better for you than the others and that makes all the difference monkeying around in the high country.
    And I guess that I just don't know

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    SLC
    Posts
    4,420
    Big fan of BD packs for this. Speed 22 and the BBee (if you can go that small) are my choices. They are uber durable in my experience.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    679
    I'm rocking an Ospray Tallon 22 for this purpose.
    The most important thing, is that the pack fits you and your body/back. So recommendations here are only worth so-so.. You need to try them on anyway. The Osprey Tallon 22 comes in two sizes, so you may be as lucky as I am!

    What I like the most about it (I have the long model and I'm 6'1 long) is how it fits. It also has a mesh with some padding in the back. I didn't really care much for this when I bought it, but it works surprisingly good for ventilation. It feels comfy, really snug and soft. Your hydration pack fits in a separate/outside compartment close to your back and doesn't take up any of the room. Apart from that, it has all the regular stuff like compression straps, several pockets etc. What you would expect to find on any pack.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,670

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Fraggle Rock, CO
    Posts
    5,605
    Have you considered a waist pack? I've done all 3 of those routes with my little golite waist pack and I found that not caring a full sized backpack felt pretty liberating. That said, I really dig my older osprey 18L pack for longer days or times when I need a little more storage capacity. It's very similar to the current Talon 18.
    Brandine: Now Cletus, if I catch you with pig lipstick on your collar one more time you ain't gonna be allowed to sleep in the barn no more!
    Cletus: Duly noted.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    2,345
    Mammut Nirvana Pro is the Shiz. Best pack I've ever owned.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Zurich, Switzerland
    Posts
    5,514

    Backpack recs for scrambling

    Quote Originally Posted by Cruiser View Post
    Have you considered a waist pack? I've done all 3 of those routes with my little golite waist pack and I found that not caring a full sized backpack felt pretty liberating. That said, I really dig my older osprey 18L pack for longer days or times when I need a little more storage capacity. It's very similar to the current Talon 18.
    Yeah, the small Talons (mine is the 11) with the hipbelt cut off are sweet. The 11 is bigger than it sounds. I can fit a full 16 hour day with weather and safety gear in it.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    321
    A lot of these 20-40L packs are better suited to climbing the diamond or backpacking vs an easy scramble. If you are looking to move somewhat quickly, I much prefer the ultra-running vests vs a typical climbing pack. The weight distribution is a lot better (water in front, food all over, jackets in back). I've been playing around a bit this summer on some of the hikes you mentioned. On Kelso ridge yesterday, I just brought a flipbelt with a soft bottle and some cliff blocks, a wind shirt, and a phone. A setup like this is good for up to 2-3 hrs with decent weather and no breaks. On sawtooth I had my full vest, but that was part of a longer ridge walk. I've used the vest on things like kieners, the apostles, ypsilon. I've carried trekking poles, ice axe, spikes, etc.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,272
    Quote Originally Posted by Cruiser View Post
    Have you considered a waist pack? I've done all 3 of those routes with my little golite waist pack and I found that not caring a full sized backpack felt pretty liberating. That said, I really dig my older osprey 18L pack for longer days or times when I need a little more storage capacity. It's very similar to the current Talon 18.
    I used to use a waist pack for this type of stuff. When I really loaded it up and needed some stability, I'd wear the shoulder straps it came with. I liked it because it kept the weight on my hips. I'm fairly tall, so I had trouble finding a day pack that wasn't huge that still transferred the weight to my hips.

    My current favorite is my Camelback Volt, which has the water stored in a lumbar reservoir. It puts the weight low and is the best fitting pack I've found for moving around. I got it for biking but now I used it for day hikes, scrambling, and even the occasional trail run. It's only 13 liters, so it might be a bit small for your needs, but they make larger packs with the lumbar reservoirs. I'm not sure if they're focused on keeping packed weight low or not though (the Volt even has oversized hip pockets).

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    4

    Light, Cheap, Durable

    Currently I use the Bacon pack from EB First Ascent. It weights 650 grams with waist belt, is 28 liters capacity (roughly a pair of ski boots and a sleeping bag), and is way more bombproof than it looks.

    I know Eddie Bauer gets somewhat of a bad rap in some circles, but I honestly love mine. I've spent the last 2 summers scrambling in and around the lower mainland every weekend with it and have used it on multiple 35km patch skiing adventures this summer, not to mention using it every day as my work bag. Oh, and it's cheap too.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Sierra Foothills
    Posts
    500
    I also use the REI Flash. Since we normally backpack in and setup camp before scrambling, I want something light.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Where the climate suits my clothes.
    Posts
    4,014
    Been using a Camelback Skyline 10 biking this season and am pretty happy about the fit and low carry reservoir.

    Haven't hiked much with it, but can see the low-slung style working as well off the bike as it does on.

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