Page 16 of 18 FirstFirst ... 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 LastLast
Results 376 to 400 of 448
  1. #376
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Church of the Nifty Blue Chrysler
    Posts
    4,987
    Show us your crumb.
    Set my compass North, I got Winter in my blood.

  2. #377
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    15,127
    Quote Originally Posted by ~mikey b View Post
    ok so I smashed one of my two jars

    I still have starter


    is there a better system?
    what kind of lid set up are you using? The KA crock lid is designed to not sit flush so it allows for gas to escape thus avoiding an explosion. I've read that you can use a mason jar ring with plastic wrap instead of the metal disk. Poke holes in the plastic to allow for "breathing."
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  3. #378
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    15,127
    Quote Originally Posted by neufox47 View Post
    Despite the water being very aromatic the bread only had a hint of rosemary and lemon. Some people could tell and others couldn’t when I asked them (they didn’t know). I used about the amount of rosemary you’d get in a container at the grocery store and the zest from 2 small lemons in the water. I’m going to try to double that and see how it goes.

    Also, when I messed up and added all the flour initially and didn’t realize it until the dough had risen and was ready for the fridge I mixed in extra water and let it rise in the fridge. I couldn’t tell any negative effects from it. I didn’t contact King Arthur for advice but it seems to have worked out.



    Olive-Rosemary Bread

    Makes Two 12 by 3-Inch Loaves


    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS
    Adding olives to our rustic Italian bread recipe made for a heavy, gummy bread that tasted bland in contrast to the olives. So for our olive-rosemary bread recipe we compensated by reducing the amount of water and replacing a portion of bread flour with whole-wheat flour. Honey added sweetness to our olive-rosemary bread recipe and helped bring out the savory flavor of the olives.

    INGREDIENTS
    1 ¾ cups water (14 ounces), room temperature
    2 teaspoons instant yeast
    2 tablespoons honey
    3 ½ cups bread flour (19 1/4 ounces), plus extra as needed for dough and counter
    ½ cup whole-wheat flour (2 3/4 ounces)
    2 teaspoons table salt
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
    1 ½ cups pitted olives (6 ounces), rinsed, chopped rough, and patted dry (see note above)

    BEFORE YOU BEGIN

    Almost any variety of brined or oil-cured olive works in this recipe, although we preferred a mix of both green and black olives. Instant yeast is commonly labeled rapid-rise yeast. Use a spray bottle filled with water to mist the loaves. The bread will keep for up to 2 days, well wrapped and stored at room temperature. To recrisp the crust, place the bread in a 450-degree oven for 5 to 10 minutes. The bread will keep frozen for several months when wrapped in foil and placed in a large zipper-lock bag.


    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Whisk water, yeast, and honey in bowl of standing mixer. Add flours and mix on low speed with dough hook until cohesive dough is formed, about 3 minutes. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 20 minutes.

    2. Remove plastic wrap; make well in center of dough and add salt and rosemary. Knead dough on low speed (speed 2 on KitchenAid) for 5 minutes (if dough creeps up attachment, stop mixer and scrape down). Increase speed to medium and continue to knead until dough is smooth and slightly tacky, about 1 minute. If dough is very sticky, add 1 to 2 tablespoons flour and continue mixing for 1 minute. Transfer dough to lightly floured counter and pat into 12 by 6-inch rectangle. Following illustration 1 below, press olives evenly into dough, leaving 1/2-inch border. Starting at long side, roll rectangle into tight log (illustration 2). With seam side facing up, roll log into coil (illustration 3). Transfer dough, spiral side up, to oiled container or bowl, at least 2 quarts in volume, and cover with plastic wrap. Let dough rise in warm, draft-free location until it increases in size by 50 percent, about 1 hour.

    3. Fold partially risen dough over itself (illustration 4). Turn bowl 90 degrees; fold again. Turn bowl again; fold once more. Cover with plastic wrap (illustration 5) and let rise 30 minutes. Repeat folding, replace plastic wrap, and let rise until doubled in volume, about 30 minutes.

    4. Transfer dough to lightly floured work surface, being careful not to deflate. Divide dough in half (illustration 6), loosely shape each piece into ball, and let rest 15 minutes. Flip each ball over and, starting from top, roll into tight oval shape (illustration 7). Using palms, roll each oval (seam side down) from center outward until 12-inch loaf is formed (illustration 8). Poke any olives that fall off into bottom seam, then pinch seam closed. Transfer each loaf, seam side down, to 12 by 6-inch piece of parchment and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise until doubled in size, 1 to 1 1/2 hours (dough is ready when it springs back slowly when pressed lightly with finger). Meanwhile, adjust oven rack to lower-middle position, place baking stone on rack, and heat oven to 450 degrees at least 30 minutes before baking.

    5. Slide parchment sheets with loaves onto peel or back of inverted baking sheet. Starting and stopping about 1 inch from each side, use razor blade or sharp knife to cut 3 1/2-inch-deep slashes on diagonal along top of each fully risen loaf (illustration 9); spray loaves lightly with water. Carefully slide parchment with loaves into oven using jerking motion. Bake 15 minutes, spraying loaves with water twice more in first 5 minutes, and then reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees. Continue to bake until bread is deep golden brown and instant-read thermometer inserted into center of loaf registers 210 degrees, 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer to wire rack, discard parchment, and cool loaves to room temperature, about 2 hours.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  4. #379
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    118
    Does anyone have any good buckwheat or gluten free bread recipes? I’ll be going home to a friend who can’t eat gluten and would love to be able to make a good loaf for her.

  5. #380
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    11,084
    #fuckceliac sufferer checking in!

    Not bread, but I've developed a killer recipe for buckwheat waffles. The waffles work really well as "slices" of bread for sammies and they keep perfectly in the freezer.

    Also, you might want to check out this recipe for tapioca-based Brazilian cheese bread: https://www.americastestkitchen.com/...-pao-de-queijo I haven't made it yet, but I watched the ATK folks make it last night and it looked really good and pretty easy to make.

    Also not bread, but I've made Serious Eats' recipe for gluten-free Angel Food Cake a few times and it's great: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...ke-recipe.html

  6. #381
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    15,127
    Quote Originally Posted by Cozzey View Post
    Does anyone have any good buckwheat or gluten free bread recipes? I’ll be going home to a friend who can’t eat gluten and would love to be able to make a good loaf for her.
    King Arthur has several gluten free recipes on their site.


    and since were were talking rosemary olive bread above:


    Gluten-Free Olive-Rosemary Bread


    Make 1 loaf


    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS
    We used our Hearty Country Flax Bread as a starting point for this recipe. While we liked the earthy flavor of ground flax in the country bread, it clashed with the olives and rosemary. We had better results when we replaced the ground flax with milder-tasting oat flour. While the flavors were right, the crumb was very dense and the crust was overly thick. Adding another egg and a few tablespoons of olive oil made the crumb softer, while brushing the loaf with an additional tablespoon of oil just before baking helped to soften the crust. Finally, two teaspoons of lemon juice softened the crumb even further, providing a great contrast to the hearty (but no longer tough) crust. The hydration level in this dough is pretty high, and we found that it needed a longer, slower baking process than the basic country bread. We had the best results baking the loaf in a relatively cool 325-degree oven for 2 hours (yes, this is correct). As with the country bread, this loaf will spread out rather than rise up unless it is proofed and baked in an ovenproof skillet. However, due to the long baking time, we found that placing the skillet on a heated baking stone caused the crust to become too dark and hard. When the dough has risen, simply brush it with oil and place the skillet with the risen dough right into the oven.

    INGREDIENTS
    1 ½ cups warm water (110 degrees)
    3 large eggs
    3 tablespoons olive oil
    2 teaspoons lemon juice
    12 ounces (2 2/3 cups) America's Test Kitchen All-Purpose Gluten-Free Flour Blend
    4 ounces (1 1/3 cups) gluten-free oat flour
    1 ½ ounces (1/2 cup) nonfat dry milk powder
    3 tablespoons powdered psyllium husk
    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 tablespoon instant or rapid-rise yeast
    1 teaspoon salt
    ¾ teaspoon baking soda
    1 cup pitted kalamata olives, rinsed and chopped
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary

    BEFORE YOU BEGIN
    Do not substitute soy milk powder for the milk powder in this recipe, as it will negatively impact the flavor and structure of the bread. If you don’t eat dairy, you’re better off omitting the milk powder, although the structure of the bread will suffer a bit. If you do not have oat flour, you can process 4 ounces old-fashioned rolled oats in a food processor or spice grinder until finely ground, about 1 minute. Do not use quick oats. You can substitute sorghum or millet flour for the oat flour. Do not omit the psyllium husk; it is crucial to the structure of the bread.


    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Whisk water, eggs, 2 tablespoons oil, and lemon juice together in bowl. Using stand mixer fitted with paddle, mix flour blend, oat flour, milk powder, psyllium, sugar, yeast, salt, and baking soda together on low speed until combined. Slowly add water mixture and let dough come together, about 1 minute, scraping down bowl as needed. Increase speed to medium and beat until sticky and uniform, about 6 minutes. (Dough will resemble cookie dough.) Stir in olives and rosemary with rubber spatula.

    2. Spray 18 by 12-inch sheet of parchment paper with vegetable oil spray. Using rubber spatula, transfer dough to prepared parchment and shape into 6 1/2-inch ball with wet hands. Place dough (still on parchment) inside ovensafe 8-inch skillet. Using sharp serrated knife or single-edge razor blade, make two 1/2-inch-deep, 4-inch-long slashes in X shape across top of dough. Spray dough with water. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature until dough has risen by 50 percent, about 1 1/2 hours.

    3. Adjust oven rack to lowest position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Remove plastic and brush with remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil. Bake until top of bread is dark golden brown, crust is firm, and loaf sounds hollow when tapped, about 2 hours, rotating skillet halfway through baking.

    4. Carefully remove loaf from skillet, transfer to wire rack (discard parchment), and let bread cool completely, about 2 hours. Serve. (Once cooled, bread can be wrapped in double layer of plastic wrap and stored at room temperature for up to 3 days.


    Ingredient Note: Substitutions
    Here's how to substitute store-bought gluten-free flour blends for the ATK gluten-free flour blend in this recipe.

    King Arthur Gluten-Free Multi-Purpose Flour
    12 ounces = 1⅔ cups plus ½ cup

    Bob's Red Mill GF All-Purpose Baking Flour
    12 ounces = 2¼ cups plus 2 tablespoons
    Note that bread made with Bob's Red Mill will have a strong earthy, beany flavor that clashes somewhat with the rosemary in this recipe.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  7. #382
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    118
    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    #fuckceliac sufferer checking in!

    Not bread, but I've developed a killer recipe for buckwheat waffles. The waffles work really well as "slices" of bread for sammies and they keep perfectly in the freezer.

    Also, you might want to check out this recipe for tapioca-based Brazilian cheese bread: https://www.americastestkitchen.com/...-pao-de-queijo I haven't made it yet, but I watched the ATK folks make it last night and it looked really good and pretty easy to make.

    Also not bread, but I've made Serious Eats' recipe for gluten-free Angel Food Cake a few times and it's great: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...ke-recipe.html
    Ohhh care to share that waffle recipe? My go to has always been the banana egg pancakes with some coconut flour and spices. I haven’t tried that batter in a waffle iron though...

  8. #383
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    15,734
    Made a SD loaf to take along with some pear butter to the Jack Frost party tonite.
    watch out for snakes

  9. #384
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    11,084
    Quote Originally Posted by Cozzey View Post
    Ohhh care to share that waffle recipe? My go to has always been the banana egg pancakes with some coconut flour and spices. I haven’t tried that batter in a waffle iron though...
    -2 lbs whole buckwheat groats, soaked overnight. Optional: soak for up to 24 hours then drain/rinse and keep covered on the counter sprouting for up to 2 days. Sprouting increases the nutrition but isn't required.

    -Puree soaked groats. Use about a 3:1 ratio of groats:water. Optional: leave the puree covered on the counter overnight to ferment, adds a nice sourdoughy flavor.

    -Whisk in 3 eggs, 2 tsp salt, 1 tbs sugar, 1.5 tsp baking powder (0.5 tsp if you fermented, it makes a lot of gas), and enough coconut milk* to bring it to waffle batter consistency.

    -Cook in a "classic" style waffle iron until brown and crispy. Usually about 4 minutes in mine, but YMMV. These do not work in a Belgian-style waffle iron.

    This usually yields about 20 waffles. For storage, cool completely then into ziploc bags in the freezer. As written the flavor is pretty neutral and works well to make a sammich or with maple syrup. Experiments with sweet and savory versions have gone well.


    * - Any kind of milk works, but I use coconut to keep them dairy-free since the wife is lactose intolerant. I also think the the high fat content of coconut milk improves the flavor of the waffles and helps them brown.

  10. #385
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    the Low Sierra
    Posts
    12,373
    the timer on my phone has a standard 20 minute alarm for sourdough

  11. #386
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    15,127
    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post


    * - Any kind of milk works, but I use coconut to keep them dairy-free since the wife is lactose intolerant. I also think the the high fat content of coconut milk improves the flavor of the waffles and helps them brown.
    Here's an interesting factoid: baking soda controls the browning of the batter (i.e. pancakes) in the pan. Without it not only are you pancakes flat but they are also blonde.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  12. #387
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    11,084
    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    Here's an interesting factoid: baking soda controls the browning of the batter (i.e. pancakes) in the pan. Without it not only are you pancakes flat but they are also blonde.
    Baking soda is alkaline, which raises pH, which speeds up Maillard and caramelization reactions leading to more and faster browning. However, chemical leaveners in baking need to have a balance of acid and alkaline components, as it's the neutralization of the two that produces CO2 gas and creates rise. You'll find baking soda in buttermilk pancake recipes because buttermilk is acidic; using only baking powder (pre-mixed acid/alkaline agents) in a buttermilk batter would result in a net-acid batter that rises and browns poorly. You generally won't find baking soda in non-buttermilk pancake recipes, or at most it might be a teensy amount in recipes that use regular milk since even regular milk is slightly acidic at a pH of about 6.5-6.7. If you made a non-buttermilk batter with the amount of baking soda you would normally add to a buttermilk batter you would get over-browned and under-leavened pancakes. This should hold true for all chemically-leavened baked goods.

    I've made the waffles before with no added leavener when they really fermented well and they still browned nicely. Whether the fat in the coconut milk actually helps them brown is speculation, but it seems plausible that more fat would help them "self-fry."

  13. #388
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    15,734
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DDA2D31B-E48B-456E-A914-CC1EFE0C3F4C.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	610.8 KB 
ID:	306772
    watch out for snakes

  14. #389
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nashville TN
    Posts
    467
    Nice. I baked for the cycle Sunday w a round, rectangle and baguette each produced.

    Round and baguette was from a dough following the Pain de Campagne recipe in the Water, Salt, Flour, Yeast book I mentioned a few pages back and the rectangle from Field Blend No. 1 recipe in the same book. Cooked the round in Lodge cast iron dutch oven and the other 2 in an Emile Henry implement.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #390
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    15,127
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Mike View Post
    Nice. I baked for the cycle Sunday w a round, rectangle and baguette each produced.

    Round and baguette was from a dough following the Pain de Campagne recipe in the Water, Salt, Flour, Yeast book I mentioned a few pages back and the rectangle from Field Blend No. 1 recipe in the same book. Cooked the round in Lodge cast iron dutch oven and the other 2 in an Emile Henry implement.
    Impressive!
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  16. #391
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    15,734
    So I have this old bread maker, it’s made for those box mixes and is on the small side.

    Wondering if I could use it to knead the dough?

    It has one of those little paddle arms in the bottom that only goes around. Kneading the dough is one thing I suck at and usually end up with large boxing glove like messes on each hand.

    I used to have a kitchen aid mixer but it’s long gone with the ex.

    Any thoughts?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BC81C35C-DCBA-4922-B377-53E3F7754367.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	457.0 KB 
ID:	307442
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	384F1FEC-AD82-4B2F-A6BF-6799044EDE49.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	490.1 KB 
ID:	307443
    watch out for snakes

  17. #392
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    I smell poutine!!!
    Posts
    9,098
    Moar flour?

  18. #393
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    15,734
    https://www.bustle.com/p/the-3-best-...dough-15897774


    When I use extra flour during the kneading the dough can get too dense easily. I try to keep it higher in moisture which seems to help the SD critters do their thing well.

    An obvious bonus is mixer/kneader could be also used for pizza dough and may be a gateway into moar baked items.
    Last edited by SB; 01-01-2020 at 09:33 AM.
    watch out for snakes

  19. #394
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by ~mikey b View Post
    ok so I smashed one of my two jars

    I still have starter


    is there a better system?
    You know, I just use a 32oz plastic yogurt tub. If it goes totally crazy then the lid pops off but usually enough air seeps out around the lid that it doesn't happen. I only use my starter about once a week so I usually feed it, let it sit on the counter for a few hours and then throw it in the fridge. I let the pressure out before putting it in the fridge and it's fine.

    The special crocks are cool and I get that some people might be averse to plastic but I figure that my yogurt comes in a plastic tub, my milk comes in a plastic tub, my cheese comes wrapped in plastic, my lunch meat from the deli counter is wrapped in plastic, etc, So it should be fine to keep my starter in a plastic tub. Plus I get to keep one of those damn things out of the landfill.

    If you're really averse to using plastic then just use a canning jar with a canning lid and ring but don't tighten the ring down. Or use some wax paper and a rubber band for a lid.

  20. #395
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    5,137
    Not sourdough but started making no knead
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1577889368220.jpeg 
Views:	32 
Size:	68.5 KB 
ID:	308623

    Dangerous new habit

  21. #396
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    11,479
    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyCarter View Post
    Not sourdough but started making no knead
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1577889368220.jpeg 
Views:	32 
Size:	68.5 KB 
ID:	308623

    Dangerous new habit
    leave it in uncovered a bit longer. Looks good though...the real proof is on the inside though..whats the structure look like?
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  22. #397
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    5,137
    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    leave it in uncovered a bit longer. Looks good though...the real proof is on the inside though..whats the structure look like?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20200102_131813.jpeg 
Views:	29 
Size:	46.0 KB 
ID:	308778

  23. #398
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    11,479
    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyCarter View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20200102_131813.jpeg 
Views:	29 
Size:	46.0 KB 
ID:	308778
    Beautiful....ill be that tasted great....good chew is my guess.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  24. #399
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    10,542
    Crumb looks great Jimmy...

    I'll post up mine from NYE in a minute.

  25. #400
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    10,542
    NYE:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9881.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	1.23 MB 
ID:	308787

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9880.jpg 
Views:	47 
Size:	949.1 KB 
ID:	308791


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •