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  1. #1
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    This Old Barn (what to do)

    I've got an old barn on my property that was built in 1916. For a while I considered just tearing it down and even had my contractor look at it and he agreed that would be the best idea but now I'm not so sure.

    The timbers inside are only 4x4 but they are still standing and the roof does not leak. The stall walls would need to come out and the foundation is a wreck from years of critters digging but I'm not so sure it can't be saved. Any thoughts?

    My plan would be to use it as a sheep barn. Somewhere for them to get out of the elements which they could actually do now (currently there is a herd of Mule deer that use it to bed down in).



  2. #2
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    This Old Barn (what to do)

    People pay good money for barn wood its all the rage right now

    http://www.elmwoodreclaimedtimber.co...products-price
    I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.

  3. #3
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    Huhuhuh, you said wood, uhuhuhuhuh.
    Real VTers tap trees.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by snoqpass View Post
    People pay good money for barn wood its all the rage right now
    Yeah, there is that but I do need another barn and this one is already there as opposed to building a new one.

    One thing - Washington state has a program where they will match funds to save barns of historical significance. Not sure if this one meets the criteria, I would have to apply but reading through the parameters I'm doubtful I would qualify as the barn is not of unique construction of view-able from a major highway.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    14,815
    See if there is a salvage company willing to have a look. They might tear it down for free.

    I watch this on DIY

    http://www.diynetwork.com/shows/barnwood-builders

  6. #6
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    Looks nice enough for a bunch of sheep as is I'd have to say.

  7. #7
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    Dec 2006
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    i dig old stuff, so i'd be checking out that matching fund program. You could also dig in to colleges with a historic preservation program [I know U of Oregon has one] and see if they need a project.
    Something about the wrinkle in your forehead tells me there's a fit about to get thrown
    And I never hear a single word you say when you tell me not to have my fun
    It's the same old shit that I ain't gonna take off anyone.
    and I never had a shortage of people tryin' to warn me about the dangers I pose to myself.

    Patterson Hood of the DBT's

  8. #8
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    Mar 2006
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    General Sherman's Favorite City
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    Subscribed. Always interested to see what people do with old barns.
    I still call it The Jake.

  9. #9
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    Sep 2006
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    Definitely keep it.

  10. #10
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    Could 1916 seriously count as historic? Serious question from an East coaster whose post-hippy parents raised sheep in an older barn that wasn't old enough to be considered "historic." My dad got our first few ewes from a buddy who was doing psychological research at Harvard using sheep as subjects. He brought them home in the back of a Plymouth station wagon. A few years later my father brought picked up a young ram in his Camero.

    What kind of sheep?

  11. #11
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    The sexy kind?

    Screw that thing, get some worth and loot from the wood unless you really have that much time to fart around with reconstructing. Build or have built one of your own. A butt load easier and you won't have to compromise on things you don't like.

  12. #12
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    Old wood can be made new
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    I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.

  13. #13
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    Dec 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by I've seen black diamonds! View Post
    Could 1916 seriously count as historic? Serious question from an East coaster whose post-hippy parents raised sheep in an older barn that wasn't old enough to be considered "historic." My dad got our first few ewes from a buddy who was doing psychological research at Harvard using sheep as subjects. He brought them home in the back of a Plymouth station wagon. A few years later my father brought picked up a young ram in his Camero.

    What kind of sheep?
    National Historic Preservation Act usually kicks in, if applicable, at 50 years old.
    Something about the wrinkle in your forehead tells me there's a fit about to get thrown
    And I never hear a single word you say when you tell me not to have my fun
    It's the same old shit that I ain't gonna take off anyone.
    and I never had a shortage of people tryin' to warn me about the dangers I pose to myself.

    Patterson Hood of the DBT's

  14. #14
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    Sep 2006
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    Granite State
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    Definitely keep it.

  15. #15
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    Sep 2002
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    OREYGUN!
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    If it has a good roof your golden. Just fill in with some gravel or chips to stop the foundation erosion and call it good.

    FWIW That looks to be in a lot better shape than most old barns still in use around here in western or.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by I've seen black diamonds! View Post
    Could 1916 seriously count as historic? Serious question from an East coaster whose post-hippy parents raised sheep in an older barn that wasn't old enough to be considered "historic." My dad got our first few ewes from a buddy who was doing psychological research at Harvard using sheep as subjects. He brought them home in the back of a Plymouth station wagon. A few years later my father brought picked up a young ram in his Camero.

    What kind of sheep?
    In Washington to qualify for the historical register it only needs to be 50 years old (we're a little younger out here than the east coast).

    The sheep I would love to have are Blue Faced Leicesters:




    Quote Originally Posted by flatlander#2 View Post
    The sexy kind?


    Screw that thing, get some worth and loot from the wood unless you really have that much time to fart around with reconstructing. Build or have built one of your own. A butt load easier and you won't have to compromise on things you don't like.

    Well.... just got off a lengthy phone conversation with the historical preservation people and it actually sounds like a better idea to save it. Only problem is I missed the last grant cycle and the next one isn't until 2017 so I need to keep it standing until then. Bonus is they said the grant would cover other outbuildings too (I've got a milking shed and chicken coop too).

    Already built this barn - cost a pretty penny. Can't imagine fixing the old one would be more esp. with matching funds.


  17. #17
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    Oh damn, that's a fine looking barn you have there.
    Brandine: Now Cletus, if I catch you with pig lipstick on your collar one more time you ain't gonna be allowed to sleep in the barn no more!
    Cletus: Duly noted.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    That's a hell of a nice looking barn.

  19. #19
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    This Old Barn (what to do)

    I would not touch historic preservation at all unless you want to kill your property value. No one wants get stuck with constant mandatory maintenance on a obsolete building

    Edit- at least that is the line I was sold.

    Would love to hear the specifics as we have a house and barn that are both 100 years plus

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruiser View Post
    Oh damn, that's a fine looking barn you have there.

    Quote Originally Posted by I've seen black diamonds! View Post
    That's a hell of a nice looking barn.
    Yeah, a little bit of overkill but very nice. I call it "The Horse Palace" LOL!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by steepconcrete View Post
    I would not touch historic preservation at all unless you want to kill your property value. No one wants get stuck with constant mandatory maintenance on a obsolete building

    Edit- at least that is the line I was sold.

    Would love to hear the specifics as we have a house and barn that are both 100 years plus
    You brought up a good point I hadn't considered so I called Jennifer back and she agreed - good question. The registry is strictly honorary so you are not obligated to maintain the structure.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    Yeah, a little bit of overkill but very nice. I call it "The Horse Palace" LOL!
    Is that living space upstairs?

  23. #23
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    How close is horse palace to sliver palace? I couldn't handle the nice/new old/dumpy thing. We tend to knock things down, dig a hole, shove it in and burn in the winter. But ours are more practicality less olde tymey. Shove too many easily spooked yearlings in there and shit is going everywhere.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tippster View Post
    Is that living space upstairs?
    Could be but right now it's just a hay loft


    Quote Originally Posted by flatlander#2 View Post
    How close is horse palace to sliver palace? I couldn't handle the nice/new old/dumpy thing. We tend to knock things down, dig a hole, shove it in and burn in the winter. But ours are more practicality less olde tymey. Shove too many easily spooked yearlings in there and shit is going everywhere.
    You can't really see one barn from the other because of a line of cottonwoods. Distance between the two is probably about 70 yards (the "silver palace" sits back further (north) and to the west). It sits on an old homestead with a milking shed, chicken coop and a house all built in 1916. The new barn was built on what had been an asparagus field so no other structures close by. The land around it is fenced and cross fenced for horses.

  25. #25
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    Grow op. Duh.
    Merde De Glace On the Freak When Ski
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