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  1. #1
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    Making Adirondack Chairs Out Of Polywood or Trex

    The Mrs. and I were interested in getting some new Adirondack chairs and are interested in something like polywood or Trex. They cost around $300 to buy new and I'm interested in possibly making them myself. Any advice on where to get materials and tips on working with this stuff?

  2. #2
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    You can buy good hardwood cheaper than trex
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

  3. #3
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    Trex absorbs the sun's rays like a satanic sponge. That shit gets HOT. Bad enough as decking; can't imagine sitting on it.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, the synthetic decking products are NOT cheap. It's also really heavy, those chairs will probably weigh 80 pounds each if built entirely of Trex. Also, building quality adirondack chairs is not easy. So, if you have the skills to build a good chair, use a good wood that will age nicely.

  5. #5
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    Making a chair isn't that hard
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by snoqpass View Post
    Making a chair isn't that hard
    Making a chair isn't that hard, making a quality one takes some skills. I see a lot of shitty adirondack chairs in the world.

  7. #7
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    I like the $18 plastic Adirondack chairs from Home Depot. Surprisingly comfortable.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  8. #8
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    Ski chair, duh!
    No longer stuck.

    Quote Originally Posted by stuckathuntermtn View Post
    Just an uneducated guess.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamespio View Post
    Making a chair isn't that hard, making a quality one takes some skills. I see a lot of shitty adirondack chairs in the world.
    Carpentry is a man card skill like driving
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

  10. #10
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    Making Adirondack Chairs Out Of Polywood or Trex

    One of the reasons I was thinking about polywood, is that I want low to no maintenance. Would something like redwood serve the same purpose? I want something that I won't ever have to paint and that I can leave outside all winter.

    Are there better places than Home Depot for quality wood like this?

    Edit, I'd also be curious about teak, but have no idea where you can buy teak boards and how much they might cost. I don't mind spending a bit for quality materials.
    Last edited by jerlane; 11-29-2015 at 10:09 AM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamespio View Post
    Carpentry is the skill that is involved in putting up a stick-built house. I am a woodworker and cabinetmaker. I build furniture. Real furniture, not banged together outdoor crap furniture. I renovated the 1905 Victorian in which I raised my kids. I also make bamboo flyrods, and generally have made and built enough things that I know only a giant pussy wonders about his "man card" or even uses that phrase.
    Wouldn't 1905 be Edwardian since Victoria died in 1901 ending that era?
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

  12. #12
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    I don't know which years are which, But an architect once told me that Victorian vs. Edwardian style of homes differs from E Coast to W Coast because it took time for people and designs to migrate west.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamespio View Post
    I also make bamboo flyrods
    Well, aren't you a special cupcake. I bet my Chinese-made rod from Walmart catches more fish.
    "Zee damn fat skis are ruining zee piste !" -Oscar Schevlin

    "Hike up your skirt and grow a dick you fucking crybaby" -what Bunion said to Harry at the top of The Headwaters

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 54-46 View Post
    I don't know which years are which, But an architect once told me that Victorian vs. Edwardian style of homes differs from E Coast to W Coast because it took time for people and designs to migrate west.
    I can see that but America was fairly well industrialized by 1900 and rail travel across the U.S. was moving people and goods relatively quickly
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamespio View Post
    You guys are so smart. I'm really impressed.
    It's TGR the bar isn't held very high
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by snoqpass View Post
    It's TGR the bar isn't held very high
    It's TGR, most people mistakenly think it's a limbo bar.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamespio View Post

    To the OP, somehwere in the city or town in which you live, or, if not, then nearby, there is a real hardwoods dealer. Redwood would be a great choice for these chairs, as would western red cedar, and you MIGHT be able to find one or both of these at a big box. Both will age nicely without finish, and both will resist rot. You'll spend more money, but an even better choice is teak. Much cheaper and almost as good, but slightly harder to source is one of the eucalyptus hybrids that the big lumber companies are growing. They call it all sorts of things, but usually with some variation of euca or lyptus in the name.
    Thanks for posting something helpful!

  18. #18
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    I built my mom and dad a pair of Adirondack chairs out of cedar in the late '80s. They are still in great shape. I used plans from Norm from this old house.

  19. #19
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    I built these this summer out of clear western red cedar (really pricey) finished in teak oil (conveniently not that expensive)Attachment 172567

    They should be good outside in the weather

  20. #20
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    I thought cedar was the go to low maintenance wood in nth America? Teak is durable & rot resistant but it's always been oiled whenever I've seen it used.

  21. #21
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    Teak is gonna be waay spendy

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesp View Post
    I thought cedar was the go to low maintenance wood in nth America? Teak is durable & rot resistant but it's always been oiled whenever I've seen it used.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    5/4 cedar decking is the way to go. I sell quite a few of these per year. I get the skis from the lost and found at the local mountain (gaper day left behinds usually), or at the dump. If people want all cedar, that's easy enough too. I leave them outside all year long, they gray a little, but will last probably 20 years without any maintenance at all. The ski chairs cost about $35-$40 in materials, all cedar around $50-$55. They sell for a bit more...

    The best part is, I live in the Adirondacks

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by acinpdx View Post
    Teak is gonna be waay spendy
    Batu wood is a good alternative
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by acinpdx View Post
    I built these this summer out of clear western red cedar (really pricey) finished in teak oil (conveniently not that expensive)Attachment 172567

    They should be good outside in the weather
    Seafin is a favorite of mine for out door furniture
    “I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.”

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