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Thread: Watcha cookin'?

  1. #3126
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    About the only thing I like more than hot 'n' crazy Hungarian chicks is Hungarian goulash. Yum...Click image for larger version. 

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    Sent from my SM-G960U using TGR Forums mobile app
    ¡Órale, vato!

  2. #3127
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    Impeccable taste in cookwear. I have a 9 quart Staub Cocotte that I can only justify pulling out about 5 or 6 times a year, because, well, it's 9 quarts.

    The goulash looks pretty good too.
    Set my compass North, I got Winter in my blood.

  3. #3128
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Stainless View Post
    Are these super expensive cast iron pans worth it? Or should I just get another Lodge for 20 bucks?

    Smithey
    Some are more super expensive than others. I got my old man a Field Company skillet for Xmas last year. It's a nice piece of equipment. Very smooth, and noticeably lighter that an equivalent Lodge.

    Personally, I don't consider carbon steel a replacement for cast iron. They both have their purpose, and I can't think of a situation where a smoother cooking surface would be undesirable. I've searched for a descent vintage pan, and have yet to find one that is worth owning. I've also, on two separate occasions, taken my cast iron skillets down to the bare metal, only to end up having to reseason because I don't have the time to sand the surface, nor can I afford to not have my cast iron skillets to use. If you have the means and desire, I'd say go for it. Field Company is currently running a sale. I can't say how they stack up to the other hipster, artisan cast iron that's now available, but like I said, it thought it was a really nice pan.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  4. #3129
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    Seriouseats.com just did a cast iron pan review.

  5. #3130
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Apologies-> I tried but ultimately was too lazy to find the turkey thread.

  6. #3131
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    Quote Originally Posted by steepconcrete View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Apologies-> I tried but ultimately was too lazy to find the turkey thread.
    Are the kids traumatized after eating that “teddy bear”? 🤣🤣🤣

  7. #3132
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrswhyturn View Post
    Are the kids traumatized after eating that “teddy bear”? 🤣🤣🤣
    That's the point.

  8. #3133
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    Cast iron skillet cornbread, Brussels sprout slaw, wild sockeyeClick image for larger version. 

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  9. #3134
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    Skillet cornbread on my menu for t-day.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  10. #3135
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    Quote Originally Posted by riser3 View Post
    That's the point.
    🤣🤣🤣

  11. #3136
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    Loving these break apart candy molds! Cuz I’m knees deep into lozenge land. Pictured is Green Tea with Lemon & Ginger (and no corn syrup - yay!)
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    And I could eat sourdough loafs every day.
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  12. #3137
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrswhyturn View Post
    Loving these break apart candy molds! Cuz I’m knees deep into lozenge land. Pictured is Green Tea with Lemon & Ginger (and no corn syrup - yay!)
    Click image for larger version. 

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    And I could eat sourdough loafs every day.
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    That mold looks great for edibles. You need to Branch out.

  13. #3138
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrswhyturn View Post
    🤣🤣🤣
    Because our job as parents is to leave just the right amount of emotional scars. Not too many or too severe. Just enough so the kids know they are human.

  14. #3139
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    Time to replace my chipped up cheap dutch oven. What are the collectives thoughts on staub vs le crueset vs anything else?

  15. #3140
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    Those staub and le cruset models are pretty darn nice but I've gotten tons of use out of 2 different lodge enameled dutch ovens (6 & 7.5qt). Maybe there not as good as the fancy ones but I paid like $60 each for them brand new as opposed to however many hundreds they get for the others these days.
    Brandine: Now Cletus, if I catch you with pig lipstick on your collar one more time you ain't gonna be allowed to sleep in the barn no more!
    Cletus: Duly noted.

  16. #3141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruiser View Post
    Those staub and le cruset models are pretty darn nice but I've gotten tons of use out of 2 different lodge enameled dutch ovens (6 & 7.5qt). Maybe there not as good as the fancy ones but I paid like $60 each for them brand new as opposed to however many hundreds they get for the others these days.
    Interesting, I saw those, just always associated lodge with the regular/non enameled cast iron stuff. Do they hold up pretty well?

    I just found a Staub on costco online for about 33% less than other stores. Not quite cheap, but puts it in more realistic territory.

  17. #3142
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    Mine have held up pretty well. The enamel on the inside bottom of my older one is wearing thin for sure but it hasn't chipped or cracked inside or out despite not being anywhere near as well cared for as the cast iron or carbon steel stuff that I have. And for like a fifth the price of the big names it was an easy decision for me. But I'm not the best judge cuz I've never really cooked much in the name brand ones so maybe I just don't know what I'm missing.
    Brandine: Now Cletus, if I catch you with pig lipstick on your collar one more time you ain't gonna be allowed to sleep in the barn no more!
    Cletus: Duly noted.

  18. #3143
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyCarter View Post
    Time to replace my chipped up cheap dutch oven. What are the collectives thoughts on staub vs le crueset vs anything else?
    From what I understand, the big difference between the high end ones and the cheaper ones is that the rim and lid are flat and seal well on the better ones. My lodge has three little bumps on the lid to form a tripod and ensure that it doesn't wobble but that also means that it doesn't fully seal which makes it hard to do a proper braise. With that said, we use both the lodge and the le Creuset a lot and they've both been great. Our Lodge ECI pot is round and I use it to bake bread a lot. The Le Creuset is oblong and is better for roasts and such. Note that by default the lodge comes with a metal handle that can handle very high heat. The Le Creuset handle isn't meant to be put in an oven over 375 degrees. If you want to use a higher temp oven then you are supposed to buy their stainless steel handle for an extra $15 or so.

  19. #3144
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    Made these the other day and they are wonderful of course with 16tbl of butter and 2c of sugar what's not to like? LOL!! Seriously, very tasty and right in time with the holidays.

    BTW - my oven runs a bit hot so I had to cut the baking time down to 35min YMMV





    Cranberry Oat Bars
    Makes 24 bars

    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS
    Dried cranberries are a go-to ingredient when we want to add tartness or chew to a cookie, but we don't use fresh cranberries often enough. That might be because fresh cranberries require a bit of work, and on their own they're a bit too sour. And like other fresh fruit, they're full of moisture. But when treated properly, they give desserts a vibrant pop of flavor. Precooking the cranberries with a bit of sugar easily solved our fresh cranberry woes: The sugar tempered the sourness, and the cooking process thickened the cranberries' juices so they didn't leave wet pockets throughout the bars. Rich, buttery pecans contributed a crunchy element to the topping.


    INGREDIENTS
    8 ounces (2 cups) fresh or frozen cranberries
    ½ cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar
    ¼ cup water
    2 cups (6 ounces) old-fashioned rolled oats
    1 ½ cups (7 1/2 ounces) all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon salt
    16 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
    1 ½ cups packed (10 1/2 ounces) light brown sugar
    1 large egg, room temperature
    ¾ cup pecans, chopped

    *BEFORE YOU BEGIN
    We like using fresh cranberries, but you can use frozen. We prefer the flavor and chewiness of old-fashioned rolled oats, but quick oats can be substituted to yield softer, cakier bars. Do not use instant oats.


    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Bring cranberries, granulated sugar, and water to boil in medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until cranberries have burst and juice has started to thicken, 2 to 3 minutes. Let cool for 30 minutes.

    2. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Make foil sling for 13 by 9-inch baking pan by folding 2 long sheets of aluminum foil; first sheet should be 13 inches wide and second sheet should be 9 inches wide. Lay sheets of foil in pan perpendicular to each other, with extra foil hanging over edges of pan. Push foil into corners and up sides of pan, smoothing foil flush to pan. Grease foil.

    3. Whisk oats, flour, cinnamon, and salt together in bowl. Using stand mixer fitted with paddle, beat butter and brown sugar on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and beat until combined, scraping down bowl as needed. Reduce speed to low, add oat mixture, and mix until just combined. Transfer two-thirds of dough to prepared pan and press firmly into even layer. Spread evenly with cranberry mixture. Mix pecans into remaining dough and sprinkle walnut-size pieces over cranberry layer.

    4. Bake until top is golden brown, 40 to 45 minutes, rotating pan halfway through baking. Let bars cool in pan on wire rack, about 2 hours. Using foil overhang, lift bars from pan. Cut into 24 pieces before serving.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  20. #3145
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    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    Made these the other day and they are wonderful of course with 16tbl of butter and 2c of sugar what's not to like? LOL!! Seriously, very tasty and right in time with the holidays.

    BTW - my oven runs a bit hot so I had to cut the baking time down to 35min YMMV





    Cranberry Oat Bars
    Makes 24 bars

    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS
    Dried cranberries are a go-to ingredient when we want to add tartness or chew to a cookie, but we don't use fresh cranberries often enough. That might be because fresh cranberries require a bit of work, and on their own they're a bit too sour. And like other fresh fruit, they're full of moisture. But when treated properly, they give desserts a vibrant pop of flavor. Precooking the cranberries with a bit of sugar easily solved our fresh cranberry woes: The sugar tempered the sourness, and the cooking process thickened the cranberries' juices so they didn't leave wet pockets throughout the bars. Rich, buttery pecans contributed a crunchy element to the topping.


    INGREDIENTS
    8 ounces (2 cups) fresh or frozen cranberries
    ½ cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar
    ¼ cup water
    2 cups (6 ounces) old-fashioned rolled oats
    1 ½ cups (7 1/2 ounces) all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    ½ teaspoon salt
    16 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
    1 ½ cups packed (10 1/2 ounces) light brown sugar
    1 large egg, room temperature
    ¾ cup pecans, chopped

    *BEFORE YOU BEGIN
    We like using fresh cranberries, but you can use frozen. We prefer the flavor and chewiness of old-fashioned rolled oats, but quick oats can be substituted to yield softer, cakier bars. Do not use instant oats.


    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Bring cranberries, granulated sugar, and water to boil in medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until cranberries have burst and juice has started to thicken, 2 to 3 minutes. Let cool for 30 minutes.

    2. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Make foil sling for 13 by 9-inch baking pan by folding 2 long sheets of aluminum foil; first sheet should be 13 inches wide and second sheet should be 9 inches wide. Lay sheets of foil in pan perpendicular to each other, with extra foil hanging over edges of pan. Push foil into corners and up sides of pan, smoothing foil flush to pan. Grease foil.

    3. Whisk oats, flour, cinnamon, and salt together in bowl. Using stand mixer fitted with paddle, beat butter and brown sugar on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add egg and beat until combined, scraping down bowl as needed. Reduce speed to low, add oat mixture, and mix until just combined. Transfer two-thirds of dough to prepared pan and press firmly into even layer. Spread evenly with cranberry mixture. Mix pecans into remaining dough and sprinkle walnut-size pieces over cranberry layer.

    4. Bake until top is golden brown, 40 to 45 minutes, rotating pan halfway through baking. Let bars cool in pan on wire rack, about 2 hours. Using foil overhang, lift bars from pan. Cut into 24 pieces before serving.
    Needs weed! Those would be epic edibles. High potential to soar further than intended because who can stop at one?

  21. #3146
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    3,981
    So I walked up to the pork section the other day and they had slabs of pork belly sitting there, don’t think they ever had it previously. Had it in restaurants only twice and even though it was $$$$$ I wasn’t super impressed. I made mine way more crispy and it’s the bomb. Not going to say bacon is ruined but a slice of this every morning to kick off the eggs is treating me well.

  22. #3147
    Join Date
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    TennesseeJed
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    9,545
    I need this Star Wars Le Creuset cookware for reasons.

    "I don't pretend to have all the answers, and I think there's something to be said for that" -One For The Road

    Brain dead and made of money.

  23. #3148
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    Jan 2017
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    on the banks of Fish Creek
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    fan boy....

  24. #3149
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    here and there
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    15,694
    Stargazer is another high end cast iron pan that gets good reviews.

    My vintage CI is sweet stuff. I rotate them in use so they all get some love. I need to use the BSR corn bread pan soon.

    Exercise caution when buying one that is caked up with crud. Cracks and rust can often be hiding underneath and you will not know it until you strip it down to bare metal.
    watch out for snakes

  25. #3150
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Nashville TN
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    462
    Bday gift from friends this weekend


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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