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Thread: Slurpee Waves

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    10,468

    Slurpee Waves

    This is pretty cool





    http://www.today.com/news/frozen-slu...ket-2D80518861

    Couple more on his Twitter page too
    https://twitter.com/JDNPHOTOGRAPHY
    Last edited by Dantheman; 02-27-2015 at 03:11 PM.

  2. #2
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    Oct 2003
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    Ogden
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    I'd love to see video.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Cruzing
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    9,040
    Wow. I literally just posted one of those in the east coast thread. They are pretty damn cool looking.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    earth
    Posts
    5,213
    Definitely cool stuff. Our beach has massive snowbanks due to the constant drifting. I've never seen this much snow and we got another couple today.

    Ice can form along a seashore in two ways, says biological oceanographer Carin Ashjian, a scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Salt water freezes at 28.8 F (-1.4 C), and when the air is colder than that, breaking waves can deposit layer upon thin layer of ice onto the ground, which add up to form a solid rind. I saw some evidence of that process on the beach, where shelf-like formations lined the occasional sandy stretch.

    But the vast majority of the icy sludge we encountered was sea ice that had made its way ashore. The prior night had been frigid, part of a cold weather system that had settled on New England with the seeming intention of hanging around for a while. Seawater in winter is generally a degree or two above freezing, Ashjian says, but when the air is breathtakingly cold for a period of time, the topmost layer of water several yards thick can approach the freezing point.

    When the surface skin of that layer loses heat to the sub-freezing air, there's no heat to be gained from the water below it, and the surface freezes. For a time, the wave action of the sea prevents individual chunks larger than kernels of corn from forming, although ice of that consistency is on its way to freezing solid, Ashjian says.
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...954428/?no-ist

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Middle of the NEK
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    4,517
    I'd imagine if you tried to surf those waves, your board would become a solid block of ice pretty quickly since it would provide a good solid surface for the starting to freeze water to bond to.
    Aim for the chopping block. If you aim for the wood, you will have nothing. Aim past the wood, aim through the wood.
    http://tim-kirchoff.pixels.com/

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