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  1. #51
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    Flow state = nearly pure / pure lizard brain. Now put that in a blender with 0.001 percentile balance, athleticism, spatial relations, gymnastics, speed/depth perception, poise; add a love of speed and the adrenaline buzz.

    Not being anywhere close to the 0.001 %er myself, I can only theorize. But it sounds like an experiential state that would make me question whether I can get the same needs / wants satisfied with a little less speed/exposure/risk, and whether I have to chase only those things. I bet you can consider chasing those things a learned trait, rather than one you are genetically bound to pursue.

  2. #52
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    this is the point. at the end I was alive and no stories went around about a 'death on the ridge', bumming everyone out. If the risk is reasonable, you can fall, slide, be carried (sluff management sometimes goes wrong) and end up scared but alive; that's what we all want, not to avoid adventure, but to survive it. Do you want to be a bad ass skier at 70 years old after skiing for 65 years? Chris Davenport does and Andreas Franson doesn't.
    Quote Originally Posted by markcjr View Post
    Doesn't look like you've skied enough vertical to get any good at skiing the descent since you can't manage your sluff....:what: and or make decisions on if a slope is safe or not just because ski patrol popped the rope.

  3. #53
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    I want to be surfing warm water in trunks when I'm 65 or 70 years old at the break out the front of my door. Will have no problem trading skiing for surfing at that point

  4. #54
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    explain flow state. like 'in the zone'? I only need low crowds, storm day, refills and I'm there. not really dangerous, but exciting enough to be in a 'state'.
    There is a current theory that we have genetic memory of experiences that our parents had. Example: when I was conceived, my father was a paratrooper in the 82nd airborne. real risk junky, aggressive guy. That sure describes my tendencies.
    Quote Originally Posted by creaky fossil View Post
    Flow state = nearly pure / pure lizard brain. Now put that in a blender with 0.001 percentile balance, athleticism, spatial relations, gymnastics, speed/depth perception, poise; add a love of speed and the adrenaline buzz.

    Not being anywhere close to the 0.001 %er myself, I can only theorize. But it sounds like an experiential state that would make me question whether I can get the same needs / wants satisfied with a little less speed/exposure/risk, and whether I have to chase only those things. I bet you can consider chasing those things a learned trait, rather than one you are genetically bound to pursue.

  5. #55
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    the cold does get harder to cope with. I like your life plan. should work, if you get to be old, again that point, you have to get old first, then put the next plan into motion. mine was to move to a ski area and be old. and ski my ass off. Skiing, with the assist of gravity, may just be the best sport for a lack of aerobic fitness or muscular power.
    Quote Originally Posted by markcjr View Post
    I want to be surfing warm water in trunks when I'm 65 or 70 years old at the break out the front of my door. Will have no problem trading skiing for surfing at that point

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by dvlr View Post
    explain flow state. like 'in the zone'? I only need low crowds, storm day, refills and I'm there. not really dangerous, but exciting enough to be in a 'state'.
    There is a current theory that we have genetic memory of experiences that our parents had. Example: when I was conceived, my father was a paratrooper in the 82nd airborne. real risk junky, aggressive guy. That sure describes my tendencies.
    It's an interesting theory, but I'd wager all I am on the point that you don't inherit your personality nor your manner of thinking about or seeing the world around you. As to "flow state" it's been described by different people but to me it's pure lizard-brain, in the moment, no human thinking/processing/analyzing/worrying.

  7. #57
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    Bit of a personal example from my perspective:

    Grad school
    Yoga
    Skateboarding (not longboarding)
    Snowboarding

    What is the common thread in these items? I’ll tell you: get out of your comfort zone and push yourself a little harder. The success you achieve will be worth it (for me at least).

    When I was in grad school my prof beat the hell out of me (figuratively). But he wanted to push me out of my comfort zone so that I could push myself and learn new things. His parting words when I graduate were: “stay hungry”. Interestingly, that was already my mantra for several years when he said that to me.

    Yoga is all about pushing it just a little bit farther every time... You watch people in a class with you doing poses that are totally insane contortionist BS, but you know what, if you keep trying, and keep pushing, you will get there.

    I have a theory that people who ride longboards just don’t have the commitment to learn how to ride a real skateboard. It takes weeks and weeks and weeks to learn basic shit. Dropping in on a vert ramp for the first time is the scariest shit ever, and you will fall. But if you fall, and get back up there and try it again, you will make it, and then you are flying and opening up a whole world of possibilities. Ripping a bowl on skateboard is way more fun than anything you can do on a longboard. But you have to push yourself to get there, it’s worth it.

    I’ve heard a lot of people say they have opted to learn skiing rather than snowboarding because it is easier when you are starting out. This kind of parallels the longboard/skateboard argument for me. Yeah sure you’ll spend less time on your butt in the beginning, but you’ll never get that surfey freedom that goes with dedicating 3 seasons to learning how to ride. It’s worth it.

    Recently I was trying to push myself, probably too fast. I did not assume the full consequence and ended up with a broken wrist by forcing myself out of my comfort zone. I don’t feel too bad about it. Injury and recovery is all part of doing sports. But remembering safety first is important and smart. There are ways to mitigate risks. Stay hungry.
    24° 06°

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by danmelon View Post
    I have a theory that people who ride longboards just don’t have the commitment to learn how to ride a real skateboard. It takes weeks and weeks and weeks to learn basic shit.
    But these are two different sports. There is really no reason to ride a skateboard unless you are street skating or in the skate park. Longboards are more for street "surfing" and general transportation (not counting downhill longboarding).
    "Can't vouch for him, though he seems normal via email."

  9. #59
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    The learning curve ( in my experience ) is way faster on a snowboard then it is on skis, at least to become good.

  10. #60
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    ^^^ It is. Once you get from Never Ever to Beginner. Skiing is easier on day 1, but progression takes way more time to go from Beginner to Advance. IMO. And, yeah, skis can get that surfy feel. And I surf.

    I was going to suggest to Yeti he go hard core yoga. Maybe that will fill his sense of lacking.

    I get the whole pushing boundaries thing. It is was makes skiing and surfing fun for me. I don't get the need to put my self in life endangering situations time and again. I have skied some lines with exposure, but well within my limit. I have surf big and/or powerful surf, but again, within my means. I have also backed away from some lines, and have also decided to call my session short after a wave got the better of me.

    As for the OP, there are plenty of good skiers in the BC. And not all BC is super rad death defying terrain. Some folks still enjoy low angle corn meadow hopping. And you can be pretty sure those 22^ slopes aren't gonna slide when it is all isothermal.

    Is creeky having a conversation? crazy wild.

  11. #61
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    Everyone go backcountry skiing and leave the resort to me 😁🍻.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Below Zero View Post
    But these are two different sports. There is really no reason to ride a skateboard unless you are street skating or in the skate park. Longboards are more for street "surfing" and general transportation (not counting downhill longboarding).
    Try ollie-ing outta traffic onto a sidewalk with your longboard, or getting over that pot hole or any obstacle for that matter. That's a good reason.

    But yeah i see what you're saying... i guess.
    24° 06°

  13. #63
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    ^^^^ Different strokes for different folks. I grew up skating parks and had ramps at my house. Now, after a long hiatus (pretty much stopped after college, and I'm 35 now) the idea of longboarding the bike path is fun as shit. Whereas, my brother still skates the local park, but I'm pretty much convinced I'd kill myself. I'll still go ride the bowl but I know I would nut myself or break an ankle if I tried to slide a rail or kickflip a staircase. I've definately toned that back in my life and I have no desire to even do it anymore because I know I'll hurt myself, but on the other hand, I started mountain biking later in life, and as trails get more flowy (easier in my eyes) I go bigger than when I had a downhill bike and used to ride at the resorts. I constantly push myself there, so maybe it's just a new outlet.
    Oh wait, I forgot this thread was about skiing.

  14. #64
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    clarifying: It doesn't matter how anyone skis, only that they enjoy aspects of the sport that are not death exposure. maybe it's more about a low threshold for joy. that guy that is always smiling, storm or clear.

    more about skiing with your lizard brain/medula oblongata? in the zone on storm day. bliss enough.

    As to the criticism that I wrote this to create drama: no, dying on the hill is drama. just skiing your ass off isn't.

  15. #65
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    I dont ski resorts. If you do, most likely you ride a "Lift" A mechanical device full of bearings, relays, PLC,s and all kind of man made failure points. Their lifespan cannot be guessed acurately. These things fail, the bullwhell comes loose and people die.
    I worked for a crane company once. I know what type of people maintain those lifts. If fact, they are about as safe as the carnival ride at the Kmart that comes to town every summer.

    Why do you think they have to be inspected by the DOT every year?

    Danger, Danger,Danger

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by TEXASS View Post
    I
    I worked for a crane company once. I know what type of people maintain those lifts. If fact, they are about as safe as the carnival ride at the Kmart that comes to town every summer.

    Why do you think they have to be inspected by the DOT every year?

    Danger, Danger,Danger
    Wait, do you mean Cranes, Carnival rides or Ski area ropeways?
    Specially since the weight is not a giant factor on a motorized bike.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by dvlr View Post
    when I was conceived, my father was a paratrooper in the 82nd airborne.
    He must have been pissed when he got home.
    Quote Originally Posted by Downbound Train View Post
    And there will come a day when our ancestors look back...........

  18. #68
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    Rawesome, BC
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    OP is living in a dreamworld far their own ass. A bottle of nitrogen and a plastic bag might be more effective.

    Life is simple. Go Explore.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWbrit View Post
    He must have been pissed when he got home.
    I laughed.
    24° 06°

  20. #70
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    damn dude you make that account when you were 3 yo?
    i don't think you have the slightest grasp at addiction
    but ur definitely a pussy
    which is odd for the son of an airborne badass
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -
    ski on in eternal peace

  21. #71
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    Reads to me like the OP is arguing against a fantasy. Backcountry skiing isn't defined by the dare-devil heroics of a few narcissistic media darlings, nor the folly of their ignorant and impatient imitators. It may not be for you, but limiting my skiing to the ski area boundary would feel like being a caged animal, unable to express the full range of my capacities. There are plenty of models for a long and full life spent backcountry skiing if you look outside the industry/media circus, and actually spend time in the mountains.

  22. #72
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    koot, you are exactly right. And I have not been clear, so no wonder I come off like an angry pussy. All I'm really saying is: media, get off the high risk emphasis, and skiers, enjoy all conditions and hit the BC pow when you feel that it's good to go. Skiers dying in their 30's is tragic, so much more to offer and enjoy. And in our community, most deaths are in the BC.
    Quote Originally Posted by kootenayskier View Post
    Reads to me like the OP is arguing against a fantasy. Backcountry skiing isn't defined by the dare-devil heroics of a few narcissistic media darlings, nor the folly of their ignorant and impatient imitators. It may not be for you, but limiting my skiing to the ski area boundary would feel like being a caged animal, unable to express the full range of my capacities. There are plenty of models for a long and full life spent backcountry skiing if you look outside the industry/media circus, and actually spend time in the mountains.

  23. #73
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    jeebus fuckin christ son ifin you ever nut up and decide to follow in the old mans footsteps
    don't raise your fuckin hand and take that oath w/ out realizin
    this is serious shit and i may die
    bc skiin and smack shootin meth and crack smokin
    bangin hoes and other addictions
    carry similiar consquences
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -
    ski on in eternal peace

  24. #74
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    exactly. I know you hate the way I said it, but that's exactly what I said .
    Quote Originally Posted by skifishbum View Post
    jeebus fuckin christ son ifin you ever nut up and decide to follow in the old mans footsteps
    don't raise your fuckin hand and take that oath w/ out realizin
    this is serious shit and i may die
    bc skiin and smack shootin meth and crack smokin
    bangin hoes and other addictions
    carry similiar consquences

  25. #75
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    Apr 2005
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    A LSD Steakhouse somewhere in the Wasatch
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    no dude your shit sucks feel free to flush your turd and start again
    and i don't respond to butthurt pm's ask ride it
    now go smoke some meth it's cheaper and way easier than bc skiing
    once your hooked ya might get a grasp at the "addiction" you have no clue about.
    Ernest was my hero and he blew his brains out
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -
    ski on in eternal peace

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