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  1. #76
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    Jan 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
    I noticed that it takes longer for my heart rate to go up, but how does it feel when the leg arteries take a long time to open?

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using TGR Forums mobile app
    I'm a little late with the answer--but when your leg arteries haven't opened up your legs hurt--the classic burn. Even when I was young the first run of the day was the hardest on my legs. I never did any endurance sports in school; I was surprised by how much time my swimmer son and my XC son spent warming up before a race. It doesn't matter how much working out you do and how great a shape you're in; until your heart starts pumping and your leg arteries open up you're going to feel out of shape. Fortunately, for lift skiing one run is usually enough to get the blood flowing and you get caught up on your oxygen debt on the second lift ride up. If you're skinning it pays to start slow, especially as you get older.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    May 2018
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    296
    Rob Shaul's leg blasters regimen is awesome. You can certainly mix it up too.

    Right now, I'm substituting the 10 air squats with 10 Wall Balls with a 12 lb. ball. Also, I've appended some ring rows and crunches to the end of the mini leg blasters. Still working up to 5 full blasters, but there is more than enough time to get there before winter.

    Two years ago, I was fit with the leg blasters and I hit the slopes in great shape. Last year, life got in the way, and I was a slug up until March. This year, going back to the fit and ready start. It pays HUGE dividends to start out strong. It makes the whole season more fruitful for sure.

  3. #78
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    Sep 2008
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    Not Brooklyn
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    8,051
    Quote Originally Posted by hifno View Post
    Reviving this thread because I was trying to think of ways to eccentrically train my legs without the impact of plyometrics. One thought I had would be to do one legged pistol squats (maybe weighted) lowering down, and then raising back up with both legs. Also might have the benefit of working single leg stability as well?
    Pistols are part of my eternal rehab, but I don't think they have any special benefit for skiing. I like downhill running, weighted box steps (controlled on the way down) and the old leg blaster to get ready for ski season.

    Sent from my Pixel using TGR Forums mobile app

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    1,896
    Quote Originally Posted by hifno View Post
    Reviving this thread because I was trying to think of ways to eccentrically train my legs without the impact of plyometrics. One thought I had would be to do one legged pistol squats (maybe weighted) lowering down, and then raising back up with both legs. Also might have the benefit of working single leg stability as well?
    Downhill jogging/trotting/running with interval pauses with alternating eccentric down then up flexion of opposing legs? Great balance/strength exercise. I'll post a vid if it doesn't make sense. Seems to add a bit of quality to the downhill of the uphill workout. Just added that to my routine this year, results are positive.
    Master of mediocrity.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    483
    Try inline skating

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using TGR Forums mobile app

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,123
    Been doing leg blasters again for the past three weeks.

    My last day of skiing this year was August 2nd at Beartooth Pass, and one of my knees went downhill fast during the month off. I was worried about having to dial it back this year, but after the second week of running stairs and doing leg blasters, I was back in the saddle again. Four weeks into it, and I'm up to four full leg blasters a session, with energy to spare, and carrying my six year old up the last 140 step ascent when running stairs.

    I feel like Rocky.

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Less flat
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    3,455
    ​I am not in your hurry

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,123

  9. #84
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    296
    Do leg blasters with a pvc pip over head (Snatch grip; Snatch, lol). That will take them to a new level. No momentum help on the jumping lunges/squats. I'm roasted even today after adding that to the Sunday workout.

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    296
    Quote Originally Posted by Best Mexican Skier from Da South View Post
    Do leg blasters with a pvc pip over head (Snatch grip; Snatch, lol). That will take them to a new level. No momentum help on the jumping lunges/squats. I'm roasted even today after adding that to the Sunday workout.
    Will try these tomorrow
    AAR to follow...

  11. #86
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Tahoe
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    15,701
    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    I'm a little late with the answer--but when your leg arteries haven't opened up your legs hurt--the classic burn. Even when I was young the first run of the day was the hardest on my legs. I never did any endurance sports in school; I was surprised by how much time my swimmer son and my XC son spent warming up before a race. It doesn't matter how much working out you do and how great a shape you're in; until your heart starts pumping and your leg arteries open up you're going to feel out of shape. Fortunately, for lift skiing one run is usually enough to get the blood flowing and you get caught up on your oxygen debt on the second lift ride up. If you're skinning it pays to start slow, especially as you get older.
    Its amazing how much I notice this climbing, especially bouldering. Obviously, it's a different set of arteries but the burn you described is so much more pronounced with the antebrachial region (forearm/upper wrist). It's amazing how much confidently stronger i am after the first two burns. I'm not sure how it's exactly related but I also seem to be much more calmer and aware of my abilities at this point too. I know the mind becomes more accustomed to the risk throughout the day but it also seems to coincide with the muscle relaxation after the burn.
    When I say it's more pronounced, I've definitely felt the same thing in my quads at any point in a longish run depending on the snow conditions, but the brachial burn has always been more of an actual 'burn'ing sensation than the pain of a long subpar powder run
    powdork.com - new and improved, with 20% more dork.

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    296
    Quote Originally Posted by scrambledbacon View Post
    Will try these tomorrow
    AAR to follow...
    Smoke factor is def increased. I think partly because it forces you to maintain proper posture.

  13. #88
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,798
    Started leg blasters this week- I'm like a weak little child. Love this exercise because you can throw a few sets in really anytime. I'm doing them in the "nursing mothers" room at work (sans nursing mothers unfortunately) whenever I walk by it.

  14. #89
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    Dec 2020
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    Idaho
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    And so it begins for the ski season of 22-23. Getting the precursors to leg blasters in this year now to work up to mini's and then full leg blasters. Got up to 10 sets of full by ski season last year, but it was a bitch. Hoping a little weight loss and much improved strength makes it just slightly easier. It did pay off big time last year in the sense I could pay attention to making turns instead of skiing myself into condition from day 1.

  15. #90
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    May 2009
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    inpdx
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    My legs are killing me
    Going up steps and sitting/getting up
    Legs and butt

    Not even doing full leg blaster yet

    Ouches

  16. #91
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    50 miles E of Paradise
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    14,012
    ^^^ How ‘bout some stair work?
    On Terwilligar at Hamilton, there is a set of 120+ stairs going up to OHSU. I used to run/walk those regularly when we lived in Hillsdale, esp on wet Oct/Nov days.

  17. #92
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    May 2009
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    inpdx
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    Maybe after this set of DOMS has subsidedÖ

  18. #93
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    Jan 2009
    Location
    Squaw valley
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    4,275
    Just because your legs hurt a lot after burpees it doesn't mean they get strong enough.

    Still need leg presses with heavy weights or squats.

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  19. #94
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    May 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
    Just because your legs hurt a lot after burpees it doesn't mean they get strong enough.

    Still need leg presses with heavy weights or squats.

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk
    i'm not close to heavy anything...i'm under no illusions: the pain is more a commentary on my shit fitness than any pretend idea that my legs are ready for ski season


    i've been moaning about the house to make sure my family knows that i've been doing scissor lunges
    otherwise what's the point?

  20. #95
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
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    16,561
    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    My legs are killing me
    Going up steps and sitting/getting up
    Legs and butt

    Not even doing full leg blaster yet

    Ouches
    It's super important to ease into heavily eccentric work. Not just to avoid being in pain for days, but because it's relatively easy to end up with rhabdo and be proper fucked.

    Quote Originally Posted by TBS View Post
    ^^^ How ‘bout some stair work?
    On Terwilligar at Hamilton, there is a set of 120+ stairs going up to OHSU. I used to run/walk those regularly when we lived in Hillsdale, esp on wet Oct/Nov days.
    IMVHO, the absolute best conditioning for alpine skiing is technical downhill trail running. Downhill running is almost 100% eccentric loading. Stairs are a good sub, but I've never seen a set of stairs that was 1,000+ vert. I think running down an inclined surface helps as well.
    Last edited by Dantheman; 09-19-2022 at 01:57 PM.

  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    It's super important to ease into heavily eccentric work. Not just to avoid being in pain for days, but because it's relatively easy to end up with rhabdo and be proper fucked.



    IMVHO, the absolute best conditioning for alpine skiing is technical downhill trail running. Downhill running is almost 100% eccentric loading.
    People who have access to downhill trail running are probably already in pretty decent shape compared to the gen pop.

  22. #97
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    Jan 2009
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    Squaw valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    It's super important to ease into heavily eccentric work. Not just to avoid being in pain for days, but because it's relatively easy to end up with rhabdo and be proper fucked.



    IMVHO, the absolute best conditioning for alpine skiing is technical downhill trail running. Downhill running is almost 100% eccentric loading.
    Downhill running will cause small tears in the quadriceps. Painful for sure, but i don't think it will build muscle. It will improve your aerobic fitness, so that's good.

    Sent from my moto g 5G using Tapatalk

  23. #98
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    Oct 2003
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    slc
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    People who have access to downhill trail running are probably already in pretty decent shape compared to the gen pop.
    Gen pop isn't exactly the target audience for this thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post
    Downhill running will cause small tears in the quadriceps. Painful for sure, but i don't think it will build muscle. It will improve your aerobic fitness, so that's good.
    The title of this thread is a misnomer. Eccentric training for skiing has nothing to do with building muscle or developing strength. It's about using the Repeated Bout Effect to reduce your susceptibility to the specific type of muscle damage created by high levels of eccentric loading. That eccentric muscle damage can be downright crippling if you haven't trained for it.

    Also, while strength is very important for skiing, being in "ski shape" is just as much about power and muscular endurance, but that's a discussion for the leg extensions thread
    Last edited by Dantheman; 09-19-2022 at 01:51 PM.

  24. #99
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    May 2009
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    inpdx
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    Eccentric Leg Strengthening for Skiing

    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    The title of this thread is a misnomer. Eccentric training for skiing has nothing to do with building muscle or developing strength. It's about using the Repeated Bout Effect to reduce your susceptibility to the specific type of muscle damage created by high levels of eccentric loading. That eccentric muscle damage can be downright crippling if you haven't trained for it.
    I need a follow up to this (in English, if thatís possible )ÖIím not following the distinction. While I am very much gen pop, I am interested in the why.

  25. #100
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    Oct 2005
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    Tahoe-ish
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    2,584
    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    I need a follow up to this (in English, if thatís possible )ÖIím not following the distinction. While I am very much gen pop fitness, I am interested in the why.
    Here's saying that the goal isn't so much to GET SWOLE, rather it's to avoid being swollen.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

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