Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 LastLast
Results 176 to 200 of 239
  1. #176
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,403
    Think this is a bastardization of a very old Cook's Illustrated recipe which has been my go-to for a long time. Season and then 450 (ish) cook in 15-20 (ish) minute rotations: Leg side, other leg side, breast down, breast up, rest and carve.

    Quote Originally Posted by acinpdx View Post
    Chicken roast I do came out of a Williams Sonoma book

    Oven to 400

    Baste bird in butter & whatever your seasoning/herb concoction is

    30 mins on 1 side
    30 mins on other side
    45 mins right side up (this can be shortened per bird size

    Turns out pretty great
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  2. #177
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    12,097
    That wouldn’t surprise me

    I’ll try that one and compare

  3. #178
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Suckramento
    Posts
    19,276
    Quote Originally Posted by SB View Post
    Its starboard, referring to the side often used to steer on.

    Went by HD and picked up the burner/pot and a 3 gal cube of peanut oil.
    And what are you going to do with that 3 gallons of oil when you’re done?
    Quando paramucho mi amore de felice carathon.
    Mundo paparazzi mi amore cicce verdi parasol.
    Questo abrigado tantamucho que canite carousel.


  4. #179
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    12,097
    Oil derrick fire

  5. #180
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,946
    If you can't cook a bird or a pig blindfolded, your mancard should be revoked.

  6. #181
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    the Low Sierra
    Posts
    12,240
    Why would you need to blindfold a pig?

  7. #182
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    12,097

    Are you ready to Roast?

    Not required, just respectful
    Also keeps the humidity in without suffocating the meat

  8. #183
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    here and there
    Posts
    15,281
    Quote Originally Posted by ~mikey b View Post
    Why would you need to blindfold a pig?
    Death by firing squad?

  9. #184
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Suckramento
    Posts
    19,276
    Quote Originally Posted by MakersTeleMark View Post
    If you can't cook a bird or a pig blindfolded, your mancard should be revoked.
    Class...this shows why commas are important
    Quando paramucho mi amore de felice carathon.
    Mundo paparazzi mi amore cicce verdi parasol.
    Questo abrigado tantamucho que canite carousel.


  10. #185
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    11,946
    Quote Originally Posted by irul&ublo View Post
    Class...this shows why commas are important
    Class ..., so are periods.

  11. #186
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    5,300
    Quote Originally Posted by MakersTeleMark View Post
    Class ..., so are periods.
    That's what she said.
    Quote Originally Posted by XXX-er View Post
    the situation strikes me as WAY too much drama at this point

  12. #187
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    12,097
    Roasted

  13. #188
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    14,993
    Quote Originally Posted by oftpiste View Post
    Think this is a bastardization of a very old Cook's Illustrated recipe which has been my go-to for a long time. Season and then 450 (ish) cook in 15-20 (ish) minute rotations: Leg side, other leg side, breast down, breast up, rest and carve.
    Love this Cook's recipe - succulent and juicy every time and oh-so-easy. BTW I never do the finish - just ladle the au jus on mashed potatoes and the chicken plus I put in a couple more garlic cloves because they are tres yummy smashed in to the potatoes with the au jus.

    I have an oval Le Creuset that I use for this recipe.




    FRENCH CHICKEN IN A POT

    Published January 1, 2008. From Cook's Illustrated.
    Serves 4.

    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
    Our challenge when working on our chicken-in-a-pot recipe was to prevent the humidity in the pot from washing the flavor from the meat as it cooked. By removing the vegetables—the liquid they released made the pot too steamy—and cooking the chicken by itself and by tightly sealing the pot with foil before adding the lid, we got the tender, succulent, flavorful chicken recipe we were looking for. After developing the basic technique, we revisited the possibility of including vegetables, finding that we could add a small amount of potently flavored, aromatic vegetables if they were lightly browned with the chicken to remove most of their moisture.

    The cooking times in the recipe are for a 4 1/2- to 5-pound bird. A 3 1/2- to 4 1/2-pound chicken will take about an hour to cook, and a 5- to 6-pound bird will take close to 2 hours. We developed this recipe to work with a 5- to 8-quart Dutch oven with a tight-fitting lid. If using a 5-quart pot, do not cook a chicken larger than 5 pounds. Use the best chicken available, such as a Bell & Evans. If using a kosher chicken, reduce the kosher salt to 1 teaspoon (or 1/2 teaspoon table salt). If you choose not to serve the skin with the chicken, simply remove it before carving. The amount of jus will vary depending on the size of the chicken; season it with about 1/4 teaspoon lemon juice for every 1/4 cup.

    INGREDIENTS
    • 1whole roasting chicken (4 1/2 to 5 pounds), giblets removed and discarded, wings tucked under back (see note)
    • 2teaspoons kosher salt or 1 teaspoon table salt
    • 1/4teaspoon ground black pepper
    • 1tablespoon olive oil
    • 1small onion , chopped medium (about 1/2 cup)
    • 1small stalk celery , chopped medium (about 1/4 cup)
    • 6medium garlic cloves , peeled and trimmed
    • 1bay leaf
    • 1medium sprig fresh rosemary (optional)
    • 1/2 - 1teaspoon juice from 1 lemon

    INSTRUCTIONS

    1. Adjust oven rack to lowest position and heat oven to 250 degrees. Pat chicken dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Heat oil in large Dutch oven over medium heat until just smoking. Add chicken breast-side down; scatter onion, celery, garlic, bay leaf, and rosemary (if using) around chicken. Cook until breast is lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Using a wooden spoon inserted into cavity of bird, flip chicken breast-side up and cook until chicken and vegetables are well browned, 6 to 8 minutes. Remove Dutch oven from heat; place large sheet of foil over pot and cover tightly with lid. Transfer pot to oven and cook until instant-read thermometer registers 160 degrees when inserted in thickest part of breast and 175 degrees in thickest part of thigh, 80 to 110 minutes.

    2. Transfer chicken to carving board, tent with foil, and rest 20 minutes. Meanwhile, strain chicken juices from pot through fine-mesh strainer into fat separator, pressing on solids to extract liquid; discard solids (you should have about 3/4 cup juices). Allow liquid to settle 5 minutes, then pour into saucepan and set over low heat. Carve chicken, adding any accumulated juices to saucepan. Stir lemon juice into jus to taste. Serve chicken, passing jus at table.
    Last edited by KQ; 11-20-2018 at 07:18 PM.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  14. #189
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    14,993
    Cranberry sauce made
    Brine made and cooling
    Glaze made

    Tomorrow will be make ahead mashed potatoes and bake the cornbread for stuffing might bake the pie though I usually do that Thursday morning.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  15. #190
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,403
    House cleaned, leaves raked, groceries stocked - mostly. Can't eat fuckin' romaine so that will require a trip to the store tomorrow to replace.

    Oignon bread acquired from Le Panier in the PP market for stuffing this morning. They used to have it all the time, now requires a special order. Fuckers. Tomorrow morning small bird destined for sous vide prep will be disassembled, seared and go into the bath. Legs in one bag all day, then breasts added at lower temp until finishing time Thurs. Small bird destined for smoker will begin dry brine until it hits the smoker around noon on Thursday. There will be butchery.

    Might do some mis en place, more cleaning, table setting. I farmed out assigned desserts, cranberry relish and pupus to guests.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  16. #191
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    14,993
    LOL!! I'm so there. As previously confessed I'm not a huge salad lover.


    This Thanksgiving, lettuce haters of the world unite

    (CNN)Salad haters of the world unite! And just in time for the annual celebration of gluttony. When we pile our plates high with a third helping of turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, we are safe this year in the knowledge that we need not add any -- not even a token amount -- of green leaves to our Thanksgiving feast, by order of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The nation's supplies of romaine lettuce are apparently contaminated by E. coli, a bacterium that can cause watery or bloody diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting and lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome, a potentially life-threatening form of kidney failure, in one case so far.

    This is not the first time this year that the supposedly innocuous romaine has had it in for us. In August, it was linked to cases of cyclospora -- a pesky parasite that can cause stomach upsets, headache, fever, diarrhea and other things too distasteful to mention here, according to the CDC. And a few weeks before that came another E. coli outbreak that put 96 people into hospitals.

    First came a summer of bleurgh. Now is our winter of dysentery.

    These were once the sorts of things we would expect to encounter in faraway lands, with dubious hygiene and stick shifts.

    Now, there can be only one conclusion. Ignore what the dietitians and nutritionists tell us. They can join the other so-called experts debunked by our new populist overlords. The truth is that healthy food is trying to kill us.

    In fact, the experts knew. In a 2015 study, the CDC found that about half of food poisoning cases came from fresh produce, compared with only about 20% from traditional bad guys dairy and eggs.

    This is nothing new for those of us who have spent time living in the developing world. The two golden rules were to iron your underwear and let nothing pass your lips that was not piping hot. You might still consume parasites, but at least they would be dead. Salad was a definite no-no.

    It was far from foolproof. All the best intentions could be undone if the roadside vendor chose to carve the hot, grilled chicken breast with his thumbnail (as happened to me during a visit to the flood-hit plains of southern Pakistan. Of course, I ate it. I was hungry.)

    And there wasn't much that could be done if the server's hands were dirty.

    But I like to think I did the healthy thing by subsisting almost entirely on bread, meat and bottled beverages.

    The good news, for those concerned about killer leaves on Thanksgiving, is that this approach can be largely consistent with life in America, where the average consumer is expected to tuck away a record 222 pounds of meat this year, according to a US Department of Agriculture forecast, and where if you put all the nation's burger buns end to end, they would stretch around the average waist.

    Personally, I would have been happy for the bland greenery of the romaine never to enter my mouth again. I've always found it limp and lifeless, unlike the ancient Egyptians, who apparently saw meaning in its phallic shape and used it as a sacred symbol of Min, god of fertility.

    It is just boring compared with the atomic crunch of your iceberg or peppery attitude of arugula.

    Yet its new role as the bête noire of the holiday table has me interested. If you ever needed a way to make greens sexy, then this might be it: Add an element of danger.

    So, whisk me up a raw-yolk mayonnaise or a Russian roulette dressing. All of a sudden, I fancy a salad.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  17. #192
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    3,553
    A lot of talk in this thread about flipping chicken all around several times during a roast..... You guys need to go buy the rotisserie attachment for your grill. Hands down best way cook a Bird. Self basting, even cooking, crispy skin....

    My dad has a big enough grill to spin the big bird. That’s what we are doing tomorrow.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  18. #193
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,403
    I have one ^^^ and will try one of these days. The Cook's recipe is so foolproof it's hard to fuck with it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  19. #194
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    14,993
    ^bump!

    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  20. #195
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    6,403
    Smallish table for me this year, 6-8 bodies. Going to split a medium bird in half, sous vide half and smoke the other.

    Have made quantities of Gillette's and smoked a bunch of salmon so apps are squared away. Thinking creme brûlée for dessert, maybe request a guest bring a pecan pie.

    Sides TBD.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    If I lived in WA, Oft would be my realtor. Seriously.

  21. #196
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    14,993
    Quote Originally Posted by oftpiste View Post
    Smallish table for me this year, 6-8 bodies. Going to split a medium bird in half, sous vide half and smoke the other.

    Have made quantities of Gillette's and smoked a bunch of salmon so apps are squared away. Thinking creme brûlée for dessert, maybe request a guest bring a pecan pie.

    Sides TBD.
    Lemon Panna Cotta with a berry coulis (cranberry maybe) might be a nice (lighter) choice for dessert. Mmmmm love me some Panna Cotta!




    LEMON PANNA COTTA
    Serves 8.

    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
    Our mission in developing a panna cotta recipe was to find the correct proportions for the simple ingredients and the most effective way to deal with the gelatin that thickens the dessert. Because cream gave the panna cotta a rich mouthfeel and a creamier, more rounded flavor, we concurred with those panna cotta recipes that favored a heavier proportion of cream to milk. The amount of sugar called for was straightforward—enough to sweeten our concoction without making it too sweet. For a flavor accent, we added vanilla and found that a vanilla bean contributed a richer flavor than did vanilla extract.
    Serve the panna cotta very cold, with strawberry or raspberry sauce or lightly sweetened berries. Though traditionally unmolded, panna cotta can be chilled and served in wine glasses and sauced on top. If you would like to make the panna cotta a day ahead, decrease the gelatin to 2 5/8 teaspoons (2 1/2 teaspoons plus 1/8 teaspoon) and chill the filled wine glasses for 18 to 24 hours.


    INGREDIENTS
    • 1 cup whole milk
    • 2 3/4 teaspoons gelatin
    • 3 cups heavy cream
    • 2 inch piece vanilla bean , slit lengthwise with paring knife (or substitute 2 teaspoons extract)
    • 4 pieces lemon zest (about 2 inches long by 1/2 inch wide), cut into julienne strips
    • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice from 2 medium lemons
    • 6 tablespoons granulated sugar
    • Pinch table salt

    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Pour milk into medium saucepan; sprinkle surface evenly with gelatin and let stand 10 minutes to hydrate gelatin. Meanwhile, turn contents of two ice cube trays (about 32 cubes) into large bowl; add 4 cups cold water. Measure cream into large measuring cup or pitcher. With paring knife, scrape vanilla seeds into cream. Place pod in cream along with seeds, add julienne lemon peel, and set mixture aside. Set eight wine glasses or 4-ounce ramekins on baking sheet.

    2. Heat milk and gelatin mixture over high heat, stirring constantly, until gelatin is dissolved and mixture registers 135 degrees on instant-read thermometer, about 1 1/2 minutes. Off heat, add sugar and salt; stir until dissolved, about 1 minute.

    3. Stirring constantly, slowly pour cream mixture into saucepan containing milk, then transfer mixture to medium bowl and set bowl over ice water bath. Stir frequently until thickened to consistency of eggnog and mixture registers 50 degrees on instant-read thermometer, about 10 minutes. Strain mixture into large measuring cup or pitcher, stir in lemon juice, then distribute evenly among wine glasses or ramekins. Cover baking sheet with plastic wrap, making sure that plastic does not mar surface of cream; refrigerate until just set (mixture should wobble when shaken gently), 4 hours.

    4. Serve panna cotta in wine glasses, or, following illustrations 1 through 4, unmold panna cotta from ramekins and serve immediately.

    Unmolding the Panna Cotta

    Pour 1 cup of boiling water into a small bowl, dip a remekin into the water, count to three, and lift the ramekin out of the water.


    With a moistened finger, press lightly around the periphery of the cream to loosen the edges. Dip the ramekin back into the water for another three-count.


    Invert the ramekin over your palm and loosen the cream by cupping your fingers between the cream and the edges of the ramekin.


    Gently lower the cream onto the plate.



    BERRY COULIS
    Makes 1 1/2 cups.

    WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
    We found that simpler was better when developing the best berry dessert sauces. Tired of thick, overly sweet fruit sauces that tasted like jam, we made a variety of sauces with bright, fresh flavors by simmering fruit, sugar, salt, and lemon, thinned with a bit of water, for just one minute to combine the flavors and help release the fruit's natural pectin.
    Because the type of berries used as well as their ripeness will affect the sweetness of the coulis, the amount of sugar is variable. Start with 5 tablespoons, then add more if you prefer a sweeter coulis. Additional sugar should be stirred in immediately after straining, while the coulis is still warm, so that the sugar will readily dissolve. Serve the coulis with cheesecake, pound cake, ice cream, rich chocolate tortes and cakes, dessert souffles, pancakes, French toast, waffles, or crêpes.


    INGREDIENTS
    • 12 ounces fresh raspberries (or thawed if frozen), or blueberries, blackberries, or strawberries (fresh strawberries hulled and sliced, if using)
    • 5 - 7 tablespoons granulated sugar
    • 1/8 teaspoon table salt
    • 2 teaspoons lemon juice

    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. In medium saucepan, bring berries, 1/4 cup water, 5 tablespoons sugar, and salt to bare simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally; cook until sugar is dissolved and berries are heated through, about 1 minute longer.
    2. Transfer mixture to blender or food processor; puree until smooth, about 20 seconds. Strain through fine-mesh strainer into small bowl, pressing and stirring puree with rubber spatula to extract as much seedless puree as possible. Stir in lemon juice and additional sugar, if desired. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until cold, at least 1 hour. Stir to recombine before serving. (If too thick after chilling, add 1 to 2 teaspoons water.) Can be refrigerated in airtight container for up to 4 days.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  22. #197
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    10,490
    5 kids, 4 adults so far. Just ordered our turkey from the ranch down the road.... stoked. going to go with a medium bird, bourbon maple brussel sprouts and maybe smashed potatoes this year.

  23. #198
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    14,993
    I've posted this before and I'm going to do it again because it is sooooooooooooo good:

    Mashed Sweet Potatoes With Garlic And Ginger
    8 servings

    3 pounds sweet potatoes
    6 tablespoons butter or margarine
    3 medium cloves garlic, peeled and forced through a press
    2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger
    1 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup milk, heated until warm

    1. Peel the sweet potatoes and cut into 1-inch chunks. Place in a steamer basket and steam until very
    soft, about 25 minutes. Drain and place in a large bowl. Mash well.

    2. While the potatoes are cooking melt the butter in a small saucepan. Add the garlic and ginger; heat
    through for about 5 minutes on medium-low heat to blend the flavors.

    3. Add the butter, salt and warm milk to the potatoes and blend very well. Transfer to a serving bowl.
    Serve immediately or cover with foil and place in a warm oven until ready to serve.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

  24. #199
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Nashville TN
    Posts
    420
    Quote Originally Posted by KQ View Post
    I've posted this before and I'm going to do it again because it is sooooooooooooo good:

    Mashed Sweet Potatoes With Garlic And Ginger
    8 servings

    3 pounds sweet potatoes
    6 tablespoons butter or margarine
    3 medium cloves garlic, peeled and forced through a press
    2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger
    1 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup milk, heated until warm

    1. Peel the sweet potatoes and cut into 1-inch chunks. Place in a steamer basket and steam until very
    soft, about 25 minutes. Drain and place in a large bowl. Mash well.

    2. While the potatoes are cooking melt the butter in a small saucepan. Add the garlic and ginger; heat
    through for about 5 minutes on medium-low heat to blend the flavors.

    3. Add the butter, salt and warm milk to the potatoes and blend very well. Transfer to a serving bowl.
    Serve immediately or cover with foil and place in a warm oven until ready to serve.
    I'm making this. I dug the rest of my sweet potatoes last week before our first freeze, so I have a metric shit ton in the basement now, and Ann loves ginger.

    Not for Thanksgiving though because I'm going to the Bahamas! I might do it this weekend. I bought a leg of goat that I'm going to cook.

  25. #200
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    EWA
    Posts
    14,993
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Mike View Post
    I'm making this. I dug the rest of my sweet potatoes last week before our first freeze, so I have a metric shit ton in the basement now, and Ann loves ginger.

    Not for Thanksgiving though because I'm going to the Bahamas! I might do it this weekend. I bought a leg of goat that I'm going to cook.
    I posted that for you.

    Sounds like weird flavors but it is amazing.
    Kindness is a bridge between all people

    Dunkin’ Donuts Worker Dances With Customer Who Has Autism

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •