Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 90
  1. #51
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,764
    Quote Originally Posted by kalisto View Post
    bumpity bump...

    Any reason why an external mic like this:
    https://www.motorolasolutions.com/en_us/products/two-way-radio-accessories/audio-accessories/remote-speaker-microphones/pmmn4029.html

    wouldn't work with the baofeng? I feel like there's more to it than just the fact that the plugs match...

    What are you guys using for shoulder mics? Anything waterproof? Been through the warranty process with BCA about 4-5 times now with their Link mics... way too wet up here to use anything that isn't waterproof.
    I've used those on boats and as long as they are not submersed in saltwater and not rinsed out with fresh after, they are durable. Personally, if it's went and rainy, I'll tuck the mic inside my jacket without any issues.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Not Brooklyn
    Posts
    6,088
    Bump. Do folks still recommend the Baofeng?

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Methow Valley
    Posts
    761
    Quote Originally Posted by I've seen black diamonds! View Post
    Bump. Do folks still recommend the Baofeng?
    I'm not sure if it's still recommended but if you decide to get one I've got one I'll sell you for cheaper than the going rate that was not used at all. Shoot me a message if you are interested and I'll dig it out an let you know what's available.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Vernon BC
    Posts
    1,675
    Baofeng uv-5r. Best value for your dollar. Hands down.
    "Its not the arrow, its the Indian" - M.Pinto

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    the Low Sierra
    Posts
    12,191
    Yes

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    804
    I assume people just run GMRS? Also, how do people mount/hold them and does anyone use a speaker mic or some other external setup?

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    the Low Sierra
    Posts
    12,191
    Speaker mic with the cord run through hydration sleeve and radio in pack.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    804
    You have a link to the particular one you use? Lots of knockoffs on Amazon, I wanna get the best knockoff.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Vernon BC
    Posts
    1,675
    https://baofengradios.aliexpress.com/store/702854

    This is the retailer I bought mine from. they have warehousing domestically, so it makes thing easier.

    We use a VHF frequency on ours.
    "Its not the arrow, its the Indian" - M.Pinto

  10. #60
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    On a genuine ol' fashioned authentic steam powered aereoplane
    Posts
    12,305
    bump.

    Had a BC situation today where a radio would have really been nice. Partner had an equip issue and skied down to meet point. I continued on hoping to summit, but turned around 200 feet short when our meet time was approaching. He was about 1-1.5 miles away and about 1000ft below in the valley with a large shelf/roll over of rock between us. Anyone have any real experience with the BCA Links? Seems like the Baofengs work better, but programming sucks. Especially on a Mac.

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    the Low Sierra
    Posts
    12,191
    My buddy programmed our Baofengs. Worked well for us today for family bc skiing.

  12. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    G Falls
    Posts
    296
    I picked up a couple of the Baofengs along with a quite a few others I ski with. I mirrored the programming to the BCA's so we can all talk to folks with those. I can 100% say the Baofengs work as good if not significantly better than the Links. The only downside to the Baofengs is the cheap ass mic. It's not a deal breaker and since they are almost free to replace, that's exactly what I will do if they break. If anybody want the program I wrote for chirp let me know.

    Don't be scared of programming the Baofengs. It's actually nice to be able to have your radio set up with 'local' frequencies (ski patrol/weather/emergency/etc). And you can get FM radio which is a nice perk at times!

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    2,985
    2019 bump in honor of the current thread in The Slide Zone. This Luddite has delayed this long enough.

    Is the UV-5R still the hot setup?

    I'm assuming there's info on the BCA site regarding frequencies for programming compatibility with them.

    I have homework to do.

    ... Thom
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  14. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    the Low Sierra
    Posts
    12,191
    Iím still using them. I have my work frequencies on them and they work pretty well.

    I saw a deal recently: 5 units for $99 with free shipping.

  15. #65
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    70

    Two way radios for bc riding

    Quote Originally Posted by galibier_numero_un View Post
    2019 bump in honor of the current thread in The Slide Zone. This Luddite has delayed this long enough.

    Is the UV-5R still the hot setup?

    I'm assuming there's info on the BCA site regarding frequencies for programming compatibility with them.

    I have homework to do.

    ... Thom
    I can send you the file with a bunch of frequencies for programming. Grab a legit program cable n use chirp. Easy.
    Iíve the bff8hp; the range is impressive.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  16. #66
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    G Falls
    Posts
    296
    I have the program written to match the BCA radios. It takes all of two minutes to transfer it the UV-5R with chirp. Let me know if you want it and Iíll email the file to you. Also, make sure and get an upgraded mic for it, itís well worth the extra $20

  17. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    6,354
    I used Baofengs for a couple years. actually the non-profit I'm involved with used a whole fleet of about 15 of them.
    Pros to the Baofengs:
    -they are powerful
    -you can program in NOAA weather radio
    -cheap

    Cons:
    -the handsets are awful. The plugs constantly come out unless you tape them in. Sound quality and volume is not good
    -programming is hit or miss. We uploaded the exact same program into every radio and a few never did work correctly
    -no ability to change channels or turn radios on or off from handsets

    Those two cons are deal breakers to me. Baofengs are cheap for a reason. We switched everything to BCA radios and are MUCH happier with them. They just work. They are lower in power, but good enough for backcountry skiing. It is worth waiting for the BCA Link 2.0 as they made changes that address all of the minor problems with the 1.0 (controls are recessed to prevent changing on their own, handset to radio connection is improved, power increased to 2W). They are worth the price you pay for them, IMO.
    Quote Originally Posted by Norseman View Post
    All ye punterz! Leave thine stupid heavy skis in the past, or at least in the resort category, for the age of lightweight pussy sticks is upon us! Behold! Keep up with the randocommandos on their carbon blades of shortness! Break thine tibias into spiral splinters with pintech extravagance!

  18. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    2,985
    Quote Originally Posted by adrenalated View Post
    I used Baofengs for a couple years. actually the non-profit I'm involved with used a whole fleet of about 15 of them.
    Pros to the Baofengs:
    -they are powerful
    -you can program in NOAA weather radio
    -cheap

    Cons:
    -the handsets are awful. The plugs constantly come out unless you tape them in. Sound quality and volume is not good
    -programming is hit or miss. We uploaded the exact same program into every radio and a few never did work correctly
    -no ability to change channels or turn radios on or off from handsets

    Those two cons are deal breakers to me. Baofengs are cheap for a reason. We switched everything to BCA radios and are MUCH happier with them. They just work. They are lower in power, but good enough for backcountry skiing. It is worth waiting for the BCA Link 2.0 as they made changes that address all of the minor problems with the 1.0 (controls are recessed to prevent changing on their own, handset to radio connection is improved, power increased to 2W). They are worth the price you pay for them, IMO.
    Dang! I didn't want to hear about the cons. Do you think some of the fragility is due to the units being loaned out and abused? One nice thing I noticed about the BC Link 2.0 is how the cable screws into the remote unit - making for nice strain releif (of course, at a price).

    Maybe I'll start off this Summer with a couple of the cheapies, and then (likely) rob the piggybank for some BC Links ... or ... just go straight to the BC Links.

    Thanks for the kind offers on the program files folks.

    ... Thom
    Last edited by galibier_numero_un; 04-16-2019 at 10:40 PM.
    Galibier Design
    crafting technology in service of music

  19. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    6,354
    Quote Originally Posted by galibier_numero_un View Post
    Dang! I didn't want to hear about the cons. Do you think some of the fragility is due to the units being loaned out and abused? One nice thing I noticed about the BC Link 2.0 is how the cable screws into the remote unit - making for nice strain releif (of course, at a price).

    Maybe I'll start off this Summer with a couple of the cheapies, and then (likely) rob the piggybank for some BC Links ... or ... just go straight to the BC Links.

    Thanks for the kind offers on the program files folks.

    ... Thom
    They were used internally and not abused.

  20. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    4,261
    Stupid question: do these interfere with transceivers transmission or reception?

  21. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    the Low Sierra
    Posts
    12,191
    They can. I carry a radio and transceiver all day every day. I keep the radio in a chest harness and the transceiver on my opposite hip.

  22. #72
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    320
    I picked up a pair of Cobra chat tags this season. Basically the whole radio is the size of a typical external mic. No cords to route etc. They've been great in trees, can be less ideal when rock walls are blocking line of sight (eg couloirs). To me they seem like the 1st significant radio redesign in a long time.

  23. #73
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    5,998
    A lot of good info here. There is a bit of basic info that maybe isn't obvious.

    BCA links are GMRS radios. They use the same family band frequencies as any other talkabout radios. They are really good at intra group communication but that is about it.

    A Baofang is a very cheap VHF radio. They are popular because they are inexpensive and the can transmit on frequencies that technically you should have an FCC licence to operate on (business band). You can purchase much higher quality VHF radios (Yaesu/ICOM/Motorolas etc.).

    VHF radios are commonly used by businesses, ski patrol, search and rescue etc. You are supposed to have your licence (HAM) but most people don't. There are some recent examples of the FCC cracking down on this. Seems like it is from jackasses just polluting a heavily used authorized channel.

    In Colorado, I have not ever heard of a recreational user getting in touch with a first responder via VHF. I'd love to hear any stories. I don't know any ski patrol frequencies or if they use repeaters for example. If you want to realize the benefits of VHF you need to do some research on who uses what frequencies and get proficient with programming your radios.

    Basically my opinion is that GMRS is the keep it simple solution. If you want to go VHF my advice is to get something like a Yaesu FT-25R. You kinda need to have a radio master that will handle programming all the radios for your group. It is not quite as easy as just entering the channel number.

    A couple other thinks. Learn radio protocol. Practice with your radios. Know there limitations. Realize that in many places, something like an InReach is still the best option for rescue communications.

  24. #74
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    566
    Very helpful explainer. I've been happy with cheapo GMRS radios, since usually the radio's purpose is for someone a few hundred yards down the ridge/ski line to communicate at a conversational volume with someone at the top of the ridge/line. Super helpful to be able to communicate something more complicated than a whoop at that distance, like "stay left of my tracks" or "the right side is softening up faster than we thought."

  25. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    100
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    A Baofang is a very cheap VHF radio.
    The Baofeng radios are dual band. That means they will transmit on the GMRS channels (UHF) as well. Legally, no. But they are capable.

    While no one has used a VHF radio for an emergency rescue doesn't mean it is out of the realm of possibility. Programming in the Colorado Connection repeaters wouldn't be a terrible idea in case of emergency in a location without cellular connectivity.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •