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  1. #9101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    Yikes, ok I'll look into that. Hear they're generally great but not cheap.
    Define "cheap." I get concrete coring done all the time on work projects, it's usually $100-150 for a 12" hole. This might be more since it's up on a wall and a one-hole job, but probably no that much more.

  2. #9102
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    Greg_o
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    Oh damn I would be thrilled if I can find anything in that range, thank you for giving me some hope.

  3. #9103
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    Mar 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by spanky View Post
    Agreed. Especially on the backsplash. We had a similar pattern and if you do any serious cooking, the grout is just a magnet for grease and a pain to keep clean. We swapped out the tile for stainless and two single glass panels.

    Attachment 477045
    Attachment 477046
    Nice. I like the smooth glass look.
    Your before pic is what I was trying to avoid when my wife said she wanted small glass tiles. Your before is so busy. Mine not so much. But still small tiles. It’s dated. But not as bad as avocado appliances.
    . . .

  4. #9104
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    Mar 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    One last piece of my kitchen exhaust issue - will need to create a 6 inch round opening through a brick wall. Rent a roto drill and 6 inch core bit ($$$$$) or is it manageable by drilling out several holes around the circumference and chipping out ($)?
    Depends on the brick.
    Full thick brick on cement foundation wall?
    Full brick in front of studs?
    Thin fake brick on cement board?

    Hard to say without knowing more.

    It’s complicated. You need more info. And yeah. As some have posted it’s not that hard to knock other joints loose while hammer chiseling.

    Totally possible to do what you said by hammer drilling around the circumference. And lightly tapping to break it loose. As long as your ok with having a larger flange or decorative wood on the exhaust to cover the ugly not quite round hole.
    . . .

  5. #9105
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    Dec 2003
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    Nhampshire
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    Not the same size, but I've used brick bits for a sump pump outlet and as long as you're careful and patient it's not a big deal.
    It's not fun, but it's definitely doable.

  6. #9106
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    ^ Thanks.

    It is full brick in front of studs.

  7. #9107
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    Oct 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    ^ Thanks.

    It is full brick in front of studs.
    Just drill 1/4" holes every 1/4" along your cut line. Go all the way through the brick. Carefully chip it out. The brick isn't structural so even it you crack the mortar it's NBD. Just patch it--you'll need mortar or matching caulk around the pipe anyway unless it has a big escutcheon.

    If you get a core driller to show up at your house for less than $500, let us know. I'll be very surprised.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  8. #9108
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    Quote Originally Posted by climberevan View Post
    Just drill 1/4" holes every 1/4" along your cut line.
    For a 9" diameter hole that's like 60 1/4" holes. That'll be tedious.

    That said, for facade brick I agree that coring is overkill. I wouldn't trust most of those guys not to damage the studs.

  9. #9109
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    Greg_o
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    6" diameter, so only like 57 holes lol.

  10. #9110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaleia View Post
    6" diameter, so only like 57 holes lol.
    But not really.
    Once you draw the circle. You just need to drill the bricks. The mortar is irrelevant. Probably two or three drills per brick.
    The top and bottom of the circle is more holes.
    . . .

  11. #9111
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    Jan 2008
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    livin the dream
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    Bricks gonna look like spaghetti… what do I know….


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  12. #9112
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    Oct 2005
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    FWIW, I'm not just making this up. I have done this exact thing on full size bricks over a stud wall more than once. It's not a big deal. Clay bricks are really soft and easy to drill, even with a regular hammer drill (I use a rotohammer). Sometimes one just needs to go for it.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  13. #9113
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    Dec 2007
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    base of the Bush
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    14,799
    Don't forget to take and post pictures of your drill-o-rama adventure if you choose to undertake this method.
    www.apriliaforum.com

    "If the road You followed brought you to this,of what use was the road"?

    "I have no idea what I am talking about but would be happy to share my biased opinions as fact on the matter. "
    Ottime

  14. #9114
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    Mar 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Name Redacted View Post
    I think the chinking stands out more in the pic because of the light. Never really had a problem with it. Whole house is that way. Definitely not painting or staining or lacquering or anything. Like it how it is. We stained the whole outside once. Will probably pay to have that done next. Wife wants to drop the ceiling in the kitchen a few inches and install can or led lights. It would have the added benefit of sound dampening in our bedroom which is above that kitchen .
    Chinking is fine. Wasn't suggesting it wasn't. Don't listen to a bloviating blowhard! Chisel, paint or stain chinking, wtf?!

    That's not a typical log 'kit' though. Most kits have milled logs that are basically the same diameter. Your logs have been hand peeled and most assuredly have been cut in some way to fit the log below. I'm sure it's not just a few contact points between logs and chinking! Your kit isn't just manufactured parts, it's been previously erected in a yard, then disassembled and moved to your property

    Definitely protect your exterior w/ preservative. Only reason I'd clear the inside is for dirt, dust and grime. Way easier to clean a sealed surface. Raw wood is not real easy to remove dirt stains n shit!

  15. #9115
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    Nov 2002
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    8,545
    Sometimes one just needs to go for it.
    This is "being a contractor" in a nutshell. Figure it out for yourself, take risks when it seems appropriate, run away when it doesn't seem worth it.

  16. #9116
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    Jan 2019
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    59715
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    Log houses look great but holy shit if I was going to consume my life with never-ending maintenance I'd get a wooden sailboat. And they're easier to burn once you've had enough of them.

  17. #9117
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    Mar 2009
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    Seems like ALL houses are never ending maintenance.
    Just sayin....

  18. #9118
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    Sep 2010
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    Shuswap Highlands
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    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Lived in an old log home once (rented). Had a wood stove between the living room and kitchen. I like to keep a clean house. The interior of the logs were not finished or otherwise sealed with anything. The wood stove just refused to vent well prior to opening the door, no matter how I opened the flue/damper. The dust and soot buildup in the main living space was too much for my OCD. I like the exterior look of log, and the heat of a wood stove (in an enclosed basement space), but that combination turned me off of both forever.

  19. #9119
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    Seems like ALL houses are never ending maintenance.
    Just sayin....
    Especially the ones built by hippies in the 1970's with leftover scraps pulled out of a trash pile.

    5 gallons of #2 and a road flare would fix this place for good.

  20. #9120
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    Mar 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    Log houses look great but holy shit if I was going to consume my life with never-ending maintenance I'd get a wooden sailboat. And they're easier to burn once you've had enough of them.
    Yeah. Wooden sailboat funeral pyre.
    Send me to Valhalla
    . . .

  21. #9121
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    Feb 2008
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    2,552
    I tried to replace a dryer in a rental and the delivery/install guy said he couldn't complete because the outlet is the old style 3-prong (pre-dating the L-shaped 3 prong). Apparently they're "not allowed" to use the cord from the existing washer. It's six hours away so I can't just stop by and handle it.

    All that being the case, is it a bad idea to use something like this indefinitely?

    https://www.amazon.com/SURIEEN-10-50...ba7b8a9276d503

  22. #9122
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    Oct 2007
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    12,489
    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    Log houses look great but holy shit if I was going to consume my life with never-ending maintenance I'd get a wooden sailboat. And they're easier to burn once you've had enough of them.
    What do you think the maintenance is? We restained our when we bought it 12ish years ago. Haven’t really done anything to the structure since. It isnt huge or complex. Everything is accessible. Honestly it is way easier than any other house i have lived in.

  23. #9123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Name Redacted View Post
    What do you think the maintenance is? We restained our when we bought it 12ish years ago. Haven’t really done anything to the structure since. It isnt huge or complex. Everything is accessible. Honestly it is way easier than any other house i have lived in.
    Exteriors have lots of nooks and crannies and splits and checks for moisture to dive into and do their thing, especially log ends. Pine in itself isn't the most decay resistant wood so it's not as rot resistant as Cedar. The shingling principle when constructing a building envelope doesn't exist in log construction, so all those lines of caulking (aka chinking) need to be constantly monitored for any separation that will let moisture in. South exposures will get blasted with sun and weather like all homes do (depending on location and sun exposure), but logs have an increased exposure due to their round shapes. And when log structures are neglected, it seems like the damage accumulates on an increasing curve, not a straight line.

    Don't get me wrong, they look great, but they do need an increased level of maintenance. For some people though, that's their jam. I was working on on place not too long ago and the owner loved taking care of it and it looked fantastic.

  24. #9124
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    Oct 2007
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    12,489
    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    Exteriors have lots of nooks and crannies and splits and checks for moisture to dive into and do their thing, especially log ends. Pine in itself isn't the most decay resistant wood so it's not as rot resistant as Cedar. The shingling principle when constructing a building envelope doesn't exist in log construction, so all those lines of caulking (aka chinking) need to be constantly monitored for any separation that will let moisture in. South exposures will get blasted with sun and weather like all homes do (depending on location and sun exposure), but logs have an increased exposure due to their round shapes. And when log structures are neglected, it seems like the damage accumulates on an increasing curve, not a straight line.

    Don't get me wrong, they look great, but they do need an increased level of maintenance. For some people though, that's their jam. I was working on on place not too long ago and the owner loved taking care of it and it looked fantastic.
    Yeah, we haven't experienced any of that. We sealed up some cracks when we did the last treatment over ten years ago and it has been fine since. Neighbor painted her house twice since. Ours are Douglas Fir. Seem to be holding up just fine. Built in '94, so it is no spring chicken. We live at 9500' and have large south facing walls full of chinking that hasn't changed since we moved in. Cracks haven't expanded, nothing. Like I mentioned before, we recently had a blower door test and it was sealed up really well against air leaks.

    Maybe log home ownership isn't for everyone, but honestly it is all I really know at this point. Maybe we got lucky with one that was built well. Trust me, I'm the kind of guy that if it was taking away from my skiing or biking time, I'd sell it and move into something with less maintenance. The yard and the deck have needed many times more maintenance than the house.

  25. #9125
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    Mar 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    I tried to replace a dryer in a rental and the delivery/install guy said he couldn't complete because the outlet is the old style 3-prong (pre-dating the L-shaped 3 prong). Apparently they're "not allowed" to use the cord from the existing washer. It's six hours away so I can't just stop by and handle it.

    All that being the case, is it a bad idea to use something like this indefinitely?

    https://www.amazon.com/SURIEEN-10-50...ba7b8a9276d503
    I would. But a rental is different. Liability and shit lawyers.

    Then again it’s a quick swap to change the receptacle
    . . .

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