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  1. #3851
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    16,892
    I drilled a 1 1/4 hole through the rim of a SS sink with a Lennox bi-metal hole saw. It was easy. The saw was 10 bucks. The arbor was 20 because I didn't have any Lennox snap-back arbors. Probably the hole saw would work with the arbors I already have but the 20 bucks was worth it to not have to make a return trip to Mountain Hardware.

    I installed a push button that air-actuates the switch on the garbage disposal, saving me from having to reach behind the microwave to turn it on. It's a neat thing. https://www.acehardware.com/departme...posals/4785747

  2. #3852
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    13,263
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    Anyone have experience installing an RO water filter? Is it DIY-friendly? Our countertop is 16 gauge stainless, who can I get to come in and put a hole in it for a filtered water dispenser?
    i had one installed. Price wasnt bad when combined with the softener. We only had it plumbed to the fridge water/ice. Didnt want a spout in the nice counters.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  3. #3853
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,162
    Quote Originally Posted by DJSapp View Post
    I'd stick with that step drill over a hole cutter for going through the stainless. Most hole saws aren't great for metals, and the ones that are cost $$$.

    For drilling, just a drop of oil, keep the rpm's low, as much pressure as you can bear (get on top of the counter and bear down), and watch the chips coming off that they're not discoloring from heat (bluish tint). Stainless hardens with heat, so high RPM's work against you, and I'd bet that's what you did before. Lots of RPM's and not enough push.
    I'm pretty sure you're right, thanks for the advice and the link.

  4. #3854
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,162
    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    i had one installed. Price wasnt bad when combined with the softener. We only had it plumbed to the fridge water/ice. Didnt want a spout in the nice counters.
    There's a thought! Current fridge only has an icemaker, so we'd need a new fridge, but that would let us save a step. Way more room to install one behind the fridge too.

  5. #3855
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    14,996
    Quote Originally Posted by DJSapp View Post
    trim plate on your spigot.
    likely there's an escutcheon as part of the assembly

    drill baby drill

  6. #3856
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    13,263
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    There's a thought! Current fridge only has an icemaker, so we'd need a new fridge, but that would let us save a step. Way more room to install one behind the fridge too.
    Ours is in basement and plumbed up so no need to move anything to change filters/service. Our water is mostly good (well), but a bit hard so we have a softener. Before i got the R/O the ice had a salt taste from the softener. Hence the plumb to the fridge. Plus it's a lot less wear on the R/O being only drinking water. Another nice part if fridge had a filter too so it's like double filtered. I basically ignore the fridge replace filter warning about 4 times before replacing, since it's R/O going into that filter already.

    Good luck.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  7. #3857
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Sandy by the front
    Posts
    2,206
    Quote Originally Posted by Skidog View Post
    Ours is in basement and plumbed up so no need to move anything to change filters/service. Our water is mostly good (well), but a bit hard so we have a softener. Before i got the R/O the ice had a salt taste from the softener. Hence the plumb to the fridge. Plus it's a lot less wear on the R/O being only drinking water. Another nice part if fridge had a filter too so it's like double filtered. I basically ignore the fridge replace filter warning about 4 times before replacing, since it's R/O going into that filter already.

    Good luck.

    Sent from my Pixel 4a (5G) using TGR Forums mobile app
    I want to add a RO system for our fridge that has a water dispenser + ice maker. I read somewhere that RO systems sometimes do not have enough pressure to adequately fill the ice cube tray, you had no problem with this?

  8. #3858
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    59715
    Posts
    3,194
    Quote Originally Posted by bigdude2468 View Post
    I want to add a RO system for our fridge that has a water dispenser + ice maker. I read somewhere that RO systems sometimes do not have enough pressure to adequately fill the ice cube tray, you had no problem with this?
    I put in an Apec HO system for this reason, and it works great. Also fills pots a lot quicker than the old dribble system we had.

  9. #3859
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    13,263
    Quote Originally Posted by bigdude2468 View Post
    I want to add a RO system for our fridge that has a water dispenser + ice maker. I read somewhere that RO systems sometimes do not have enough pressure to adequately fill the ice cube tray, you had no problem with this?
    not yet....seems to produce ice just fine. My fridge actually has 2 ice makers. One in door and one in freezer drawer. Small cubes/crushed top, bottom large cubes. But the RO has had no issues keeping up. Ours has something like a 3gallon capacity.
    http://www.firsttracksonline.com

    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  10. #3860
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
    Posts
    13,185
    Quote Originally Posted by diggins1712 View Post
    What were the ages of houses you tested?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Old as balls. One was built in 192x and had vermiculite insulation. The vermiculite, by some miracle, did not have asbestos.

    Then there was a popcorn ceiling from the 1960s or 1970s (guessing) in a much older house. No asbestos.

    Then our current house was built in 1966 and has some sort of weird shaved wood product as ceiling insulation. Again, no asbestos.

    I also 100% agree with everyone who is saying it's not a problem unless you are going to make dust.

  11. #3861
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    59715
    Posts
    3,194
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	371745

    Pro tip: Don't do this.

  12. #3862
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    6,968
    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PXL_20210416_160639611.jpg 
Views:	90 
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ID:	371745

    Pro tip: Don't do this.
    WTF is going on here? Attempt to burn the house down?

  13. #3863
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,816
    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	PXL_20210416_160639611.jpg 
Views:	90 
Size:	1.74 MB 
ID:	371745

    Pro tip: Don't do this.
    Is that speaker wire?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  14. #3864
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    6,968
    I knew I was in for some homeowner fuckery when I recently installed a new microwave. I was not, however, prepared for this retardation:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	371747  

  15. #3865
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    59715
    Posts
    3,194
    Quote Originally Posted by skaredshtles View Post
    WTF is going on here? Attempt to burn the house down?
    I cannot see how they didn't burn it down.

  16. #3866
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Where homo sapiens have outgrown their use.
    Posts
    8,078
    What's that wrapped in pipe wrap running through there? I'm confused and scared. Somebody got really lucky.
    "Hakuna matata, motherfucker!"

  17. #3867
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
    Posts
    13,185
    What is it? I have zero clue...except that it's hot and appears to have scorched the closed cell insulation. The duct tape is a nice touch, though.

  18. #3868
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Where homo sapiens have outgrown their use.
    Posts
    8,078
    That's why I'm confused. Whatever it is looks like it's wrapped in pipe wrap, but it got hot enough to scorch the spray foam? Weird, wild stuff.
    "Hakuna matata, motherfucker!"

  19. #3869
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    6,968
    My guess is that's a hot water line that someone did some solder work on and attempted to light the floor joist on fire? Then put pipe wrap over the line 'cause hot water?

  20. #3870
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    59715
    Posts
    3,194
    Copper pipe to hydronic baseboard heat. Someone was soldering and somehow didn't set that foam insulation on fire. That stuff burns like gasoline. Someone came along later and insulated it.

  21. #3871
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    12,761
    I don't see a problem, other than that speaker cable should be insulated as well.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  22. #3872
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the ham
    Posts
    9,312
    Does it sound better if it's kept warm?

  23. #3873
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    166
    any of you dentists ever repoint a flagstone chimney?

  24. #3874
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    A LSD Steakhouse somewhere in the Wasatch
    Posts
    12,338
    not flagstone but yes ive tuckpointed flashed and counterflashed my share of chimneys
    arcrylic mortar fortifier ftw
    "When the child was a child it waited patiently for the first snow and it still does"- Van "The Man" Morrison
    "I find I have already had my reward, in the doing of the thing" - Buzz Holmstrom
    "THIS IS WHAT WE DO"-AML -ski on in eternal peace
    "I have posted in here but haven't read it carefully with my trusty PoliAsshat antenna on."-DipshitDanno

  25. #3875
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    16,892
    The front of our garage has 3 concrete shear walls on either side of and between the doors. I covered the concrete with granite. I don't recall what mortar I used. The stone has held up well for 10 years, but this winter one of the stones at the top of a pillar fell off. What should I use to cement the stone back in place--mortar--if so what type, thinset, something else? Subject to heavy freeze/thaw. The top of the pillar is open to the sky and gets drips from the deck above. The top of the pillar is above the top of the concrete and the top stones lie against the T111 siding. I could add a brick tie or two under the replaced stone or would that be unnecessary if I use the right adhesive and seal all gaps well?

    The joint between the top stone and the T111 was originally sealed with silicone caulk but I assume water got behind the stone and froze. Is there something better to use to seal that joint.

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