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  1. #1376
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
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    12,168
    (Hire an architect/designer before committing to a plan.)

  2. #1377
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    PRB
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    22,381
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    I promise not to go nuts with a concrete saw based on ski forum advice.
    Well that's no fun.
    "fuck off you asshat gaper shit for brains fucktard wanker." - Jesus Christ
    "She was tossing her bean salad with the vigor of a Drunken Pop princess so I walked out of the corner and said.... "need a hand?"" - Odin

  3. #1378
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    your vacation
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    2,006
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post

    Final call on feasibility is TBD. I promise not to go nuts with a concrete saw based on ski forum advice.
    where do you live?
    I got two concrete saws, pick one the husky or the sthil
    65 an hr 100 an hr if you want to help plus the cost of a blade, probably 120 bucks
    usually I prefer to have one guy cutting three guys watching, we need a garden hose and I prefer to cut concrete in an inclosed space it makes it all the more fun
    we also make our own chaps out of trash bags and duck tape or you could throw down and buy me a nice pair
    just post your home address so I know where to go

  4. #1379
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Bozone
    Posts
    1,417
    continuing on fastfred's post - concrete cutters love to make a big mess. If they aren't slinging slurry across the ceiling 20 feet away they get real upset. Depending on the level of tear out in the interior of the basement, please take this in account.

  5. #1380
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    your vacation
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    2,006
    imagine a garden hose just draining into your house the sweet smell of two stroke exahust the sounds of jackhammers it's like printing money

  6. #1381
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    9,209
    Quote Originally Posted by fastfred View Post
    where do you live?
    I got two concrete saws, pick one the husky or the sthil
    65 an hr 100 an hr if you want to help plus the cost of a blade, probably 120 bucks
    usually I prefer to have one guy cutting three guys watching, we need a garden hose and I prefer to cut concrete in an inclosed space it makes it all the more fun
    we also make our own chaps out of trash bags and duck tape or you could throw down and buy me a nice pair
    just post your home address so I know where to go
    That sounds expensive. Neighbor kid said he'd do it with a sledge and a jackhammer that he "borrowed" for $20.

  7. #1382
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    1,453
    Crib notes:

    The issue you may or may not have is lateral pressure on the walls. Right now the corner is tied together so the wall can't push outward. Once you put a 3' hole in one side of the corner, that lateral resistance is gone. Normally, if the foundation is cast that way to start, they'll have rebar resisting that overturning moment to the extent possible. All it takes is about a 18" section of concrete return and the right bar and you are usually ok, depending on loads. You won't have that.

    Might be ok if the floor above is working as a lateral diaphragm to resist outward pressure, meaning all the force that wants to blow the walls out is resisted by the floor sandwich (specifically the floor sheathing.) Can't know without seeing your house, as stuff like window placement and holes in the floor (stairs, 2 story spaces) can prevent this. The further inboard from the corner you cut the hole the safer it is because that little remaining concrete corner will work to resist that pressure.

    The other potential issue is wind shear. If you are in a place that gets high winds then racking is an issue, and this also could add lateral pressure.

    Long story short, you can probably cut the hole, but check with an engineer to see how far away from the corner you need to push it. Will depend on the above plus and actual structural load paths and whether things like gable roofs are causing additional lateral loads. I've actually seen foundation walls crack out because of alterations like this. You don't need that. You've got bikes to ride, not walls to fix.

  8. #1383
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
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    12,168
    fuckin' fun police in here. gtfo.

  9. #1384
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    48,566
    give'r

  10. #1385
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    1,453
    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    fuckin' fun police in here. gtfo.
    Heh. Well he can still hire the kid with the jackhammer to do the work...

  11. #1386
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    9,209
    Quote Originally Posted by beece View Post
    You don't need that. You've got bikes to ride, not walls to fix.
    That's a fact. Especially since it's like 40 degrees here right now and not snowing. Because winter isn't really a thing anymore, apparently.

    Anyways, thanks for the notes all. Seems like it's probably workable, maybe with skootching the door away from the corner as much as possible. I'll get my buddy who used to be an engineer in the semi-conductor industry to verify - I'm pretty sure he can put a stamp on the sketch I drew up.

  12. #1387
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Bozone
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    1,417
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    I'll get my buddy who used to be an engineer in the semi-conductor industry to verify - I'm pretty sure he can put a stamp on the sketch I drew up.
    It will probably be just as good as most SE stamps.

  13. #1388
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
    Posts
    318
    What level of detail should I insist on from my remodel contract?

    Scope of work is like bullet points - I was gonna ask to staple the detailed estimate with allowances and stuff as Attachment A. Good enough?

    Nothing on termination clauses or lien waivers....what do I need there?

    I am a JONG on this stuff.

  14. #1389
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    48,566
    Best to keep it simple and clear. There's some sample contracts here: https://www.homeadvisor.com/r/sample-contracts/

    Your bullet points could go into it as an attachment

  15. #1390
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    your vacation
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    2,006
    what are you worried about? seriously?

    lien waver? why? you can require it, I do lien waivers on commercial jobs only or if the customer requests it, I also charge to do waivers, costs you more
    bonding? again only commerical jobs. it will cost you, not me 3% of the project cost
    people who write bonded on the side of their trucks are full of shit

    termination clause yes, but it's always written in my favor not yours

    payment schedule is the biggest thing you want to see in writing, how much you pay when and always have a completion clause (for you) in the payment schedule no one is getting paid to do something that hasn't been done

    used to do 2 page contracts for jobs under 5k, stopped doing that
    I still do the 2 page contract when I charge for estiamtes
    my contracts run anywhere from 15-40 pages depending on the job, covers everythign from where I am taking a shit to checking out your wife's tits

    depending

  16. #1391
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by fastfred View Post
    what are you worried about? seriously?

    lien waver? why? you can require it, I do lien waivers on commercial jobs only or if the customer requests it, I also charge to do waivers, costs you more
    bonding? again only commerical jobs. it will cost you, not me 3% of the project cost
    people who write bonded on the side of their trucks are full of shit

    termination clause yes, but it's always written in my favor not yours

    payment schedule is the biggest thing you want to see in writing, how much you pay when and always have a completion clause (for you) in the payment schedule no one is getting paid to do something that hasn't been done

    used to do 2 page contracts for jobs under 5k, stopped doing that
    I still do the 2 page contract when I charge for estiamtes
    my contracts run anywhere from 15-40 pages depending on the job, covers everythign from where I am taking a shit to checking out your wife's tits

    depending
    What am I worried about? Famous last words..... How about workers and contractors flaking and/or taking 6 months to do a promised 5 week job while my house and kitchen are torn up? Or is that never gonna happen? I've experienced this myself on non_RE jobs and have heard horror stories from others. If its $1000 no worries....if its tens of thousands....yeah I am gonna be worried.

    Any suggestions for a payment schedule? Right now contractor just has arbitrary (Phase 1, Phase 2, Phase 3, final)....without any description of what these phases are. Designer just says she will "tell me when those are due"....lol. I'd be ok with that if they didn't throw a "10% penalty if 7 days overdue".....because then I could decide if the work wasn't progressing according to schedule.

  17. #1392
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    your vacation
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    2,006
    If I were a customer I'd be worried about people working and not being covered by WC, or if they have not signed their rights away with the contractor, which is typical to do if you are a sole proprietor who who works alone with no employees or helpers

    all my jobs take 2x longer than they should mine usually run 10% to 60% over shedule, have one right now that is running three times longer than I estimated, opps I fucked up and so did the customer, it happens, read my lips, I don't give fuck anymore, sorry bro, I have a piss poor attitude and don't care anymore, it is what it is, twenty plus years of this kind of work and still being in business will ruin a person, being nice and cool are not something a long time contractor will give you, they will and should bend over backwards to make you happy at the same time, it's all a two way street


    8payments is alittle absured, 10k and under 2-3 payments
    10-100 k 4 or 5 payments
    100k and above monthly payments

    deposits which are illegal in a few states fyi
    phase one 2 3 should all be outlined as to what they will get done
    #1 deposite 15-30% of the project cost depending on how much the contactor is going to throw down for start up costs, ie are they buying cabinets etc
    #2 demo completed all trash a debris hauled off site, trash and cleaning are always over looked, I've consulted on a few abortions and I always see trash laying around on them or they abuse the community dumpster
    #3 rough electric and plumbing complete and inspected
    #4 insulation and drywall completed drywall primered
    #5 #6 #7 finishes, flooring installed cabinets, painting, elec and plumbing trim
    #8 final payment contract should specifiy a pre agreeed amount, percentage of total contract price, to with hold for customer punch lists, how the customer is to provide the punch list warrenty etc, I do not warrenty any items purchased by the customer or a third party, says so in contract


    designs, well yeah, I'm not a designer hater, I love them, but that's just how they operate,

  18. #1393
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    12,126
    The laws vary state by state. What might work for fred in CO (?), might not work for bumpsalot in OR.
    What doesn't vary is human nature. If you have a good contractor all will be well. If you don't the best contract in the world won't save you.

  19. #1394
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
    Posts
    318
    Got them to attach estimates as an addendum and include termination clause and clarifications on the above stuff. Thanks for the advices.

  20. #1395
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    8,444

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Bathroom is gutted. Pulled the underlayment and thereís a flexy spot under the toilet. The wood isnít rotted.

    Flex spot is small (circle) Does this need to be replaced? Iíd just fix it normally but there are pipes along both joists (arrow to nearest) keeping me from butting a brace in between the joists to support the patch. Iím putting 3/4Ē plywood over and then tile. Please tell me itís a small enough spot not to matter.

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    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  21. #1396
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    12,681
    can you replace sheathing with new that spans that unsupported edge? and then also add the 3/4" over that?
    (very hard to understand without seeing the framing below)

    or block that edge with a sistered 2x?


    i'd be wary that even w/ the new 3/4 ply that you'd still have a soft spot that someone sitting on the throne would cause to flex on your new floor tile install

    might ask your tile guy...he might have a feel for that sort of thing (unless that's you...)

  22. #1397
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    8,444
    Iím the tile guy...for now. This kinda shit is making nuts.

    The screw line indicates the joist to the left of the toilet drain. Other joist is under the wall framing. Thereís a ton of shit running to the right of the toilet drain. I could cut along the center of the left joist and use that for support, but canít think of any way to support the right side.

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    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  23. #1398
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,163
    You are putting 3/4 on top of what we see? The existing joists are 16" o.c.? If so, you are fine, that is the new construction standard most places. Any seems should be t&g however.

  24. #1399
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    8,444
    Yes. Subfloor is 1/2Ē plywood (not t&g). Plan is to level then put 3/4Ē over this for tile. House was built in Ď77. Joists are 14Ē on center except this section which is closer to 18Ē.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  25. #1400
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,163
    Sounds good. How out of level are we talking? What are you gonna do about it?

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