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  1. #1576
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    I dunno, the article I linked above says the above-ground business comes from Fannie Mae and the National Institute of Standards (ANSI) which seems pretty national to me but whatever.

  2. #1577
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    Nov 2005
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    You are all talking past each other. There are at least three issues: appraisals for price, appraisals/assessments for taxes, and whatever bullshit people put on the MLS. These are all different. Some are regional and some are not.

    I think the suggestion that a nicely finished basement with lots of natural light will not add value is insane. Of course it will. Do you remember having small children? Sending them down there to GTFO of the "adult" space is worth more than gold. That said, remodeling to "add value" has always been and will always be a bad way to make money. Remodel to suit your needs and if you are only going to be there a few years tread with extreme caution.

  3. #1578
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    Talk to me. We have boxes of white hexagonal tile for the floor, but I'm having second thoughts cause I know we (the kids) will destroy it. This stuff pretty tough? If there's 3/8 gap at the edges, what keeps it from moving around in a floating install? Better to glue it down?
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  4. #1579
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    Not sure why the kids would destroy tile? Just use dark gray grout.

    But I have never had an issue with the floating cork moving around. Even with the gaps, the toilet will hold it down. Plus for a small room like a bathroom, the expansion/contraction will be miniscule. I did glue the joints around the tub area so any standing water couldn't get to them. We don't live in the house where I installed it but for my next remodel I am putting cork on the entire upper level (but glue down, not floating), so that tells you what I think about durability. I have also worked on houses with 60+ year old cork that looked great.

  5. #1580
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    Not sure why the kids would destroy tile? Just use dark gray grout.
    More of a how than a why. I'm not sure how, but my son will find a way.

    Good info on the cork, thanks.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  6. #1581
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    Not sure why the kids would destroy tile? Just use dark gray grout.

    But I have never had an issue with the floating cork moving around. Even with the gaps, the toilet will hold it down. Plus for a small room like a bathroom, the expansion/contraction will be miniscule. I did glue the joints around the tub area so any standing water couldn't get to them. We don't live in the house where I installed it but for my next remodel I am putting cork on the entire upper level (but glue down, not floating), so that tells you what I think about durability. I have also worked on houses with 60+ year old cork that looked great.
    Dog durable?

  7. #1582
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    Nov 2005
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    Good question. I have read that dogs can scratch it. But it is also "soft" enough that they won't skitter across it like wood or tile. The 60 year old cork house had two dogs and the people were happy enough with it that we installed another 500 square feet of it in a high-traffic area. It's 1200 miles away so I haven't been back to see how it holds up.

    I currently have a puppy who loves to slide around on the wood and spin her wheels (you know what I mean) and I would be very curious to see how it holds up. But again, if they can't slide I don't see how they would mess it up. Others have chimed in on this issue and said they have had no problems.

  8. #1583
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    Mar 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Talk to me. We have boxes of white hexagonal tile for the floor, but I'm having second thoughts cause I know we (the kids) will destroy it. This stuff pretty tough? If there's 3/8 gap at the edges, what keeps it from moving around in a floating install? Better to glue it down?
    I used floating cork in a small room and the durability is OK, not bombproof. I did glue down right at the entry to avoid the hollow sound and give a decent anchor for the rest pf the floor. It's cheap and keep a few extra pieces to replace any fucked up ones in the future.

  9. #1584
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    Thanks!

    Another question. I've "leveled" the back and side wall studs of the tub surround so the backer board can lay flat, but there's a slight inward taper of the side walls from the bottom to the top of the back wall. Probably 1/4", maybe a little more - it was 1 AM and I was ready for bed, I'll go back and measure this evening. Is that enough to notice that my edge tiles are shrinking from bottom to top?
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  10. #1585
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    slc
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    More of a how than a why. I'm not sure how, but my son will find a way.
    LOL, yeah. I can't help but read that in this voice:



    They're human wrecking balls, they'll find a way.

  11. #1586
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    Oct 2002
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    Two cement board specific circular saw blades, three jigsaw blades, a hole saw, and some lung cancer later and my backer board is up.

    So, here’s some advice. If you’re putting up shower walls, sport for the Wedi or Kerdi systems. 3x the cost seems cheap now.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  12. #1587
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    Sep 2006
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    I enjoy my porcelain tile for several reasons. Holding the cool temp from overnight during summertime being one, ease of cleaning spills another. But it does break glass like no other. People told me that before I laid it, but I didn’t comprehend how explosive the results are. Benefits and disadvantages of all materials.

  13. #1588
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    The architect friend who designed our recent bathroom addition is a genius. Getting a heating duct from the crawl space of the existing house to the bathroom which had a slab foundation he ran it through a bench in the double shower. Then he put one vent under where our towels hand and one next to the toilet, so both the towels and the toilet seat are warm in the winter.

  14. #1589
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    Apr 2005
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    The land of Genesee Cream Ale and homemade pierogies!
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    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    The architect friend who designed our recent bathroom addition is a genius. Getting a heating duct from the crawl space of the existing house to the bathroom which had a slab foundation he ran it through a bench in the double shower. Then he put one vent under where our towels hand and one next to the toilet, so both the towels and the toilet seat are warm in the winter.
    He's a keeper!

    Most architects, IME, you'll hear them grumble something along the lines of 'I don't get HVAC,' meaning how to size, calculate, specify etc. HVAC systems. They usually sub out the design work.
    “The best argument in favour of a 90% tax rate on the rich is a five-minute chat with the average rich person.”

    - Winston Churchill, paraphrased.

  15. #1590
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody Famous View Post
    He's a keeper!

    Most architects, IME, you'll hear them grumble something along the lines of 'I don't get HVAC,' meaning how to size, calculate, specify etc. HVAC systems. They usually sub out the design work.
    When we submitted the plans for the addition the very tough plan checker wanted an engineer to certify that the existing furnace was adequate for the addition. I did the calculations myself--figuring every window, every wall, how much roof, how much insulation, etc and she actually accepted it. (When we replaced the furnace a year later we didn't bother with the calculations, or the permit.)

  16. #1591
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Two cement board specific circular saw blades, three jigsaw blades, a hole saw, and some lung cancer later and my backer board is up.

    So, here’s some advice. If you’re putting up shower walls, sport for the Wedi or Kerdi systems. 3x the cost seems cheap now.
    Good advice. I'm going to follow it, but I hope you're kidding about the lung cancer, tho?
    Screw the net, Surf the backcountry!

  17. #1592
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    livin the dream
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddy View Post
    Good advice. I'm going to follow it, but I hope you're kidding about the lung cancer, tho?
    Breathing in silica is not good


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  18. #1593
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    Agreed... assuming he was just saying that, but as a warning. Wife went to a funeral for a lung cancer victim today and lost her mother at age 46 to lc.
    Screw the net, Surf the backcountry!

  19. #1594
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    Pretty sure it was just intended as a figure of speech. Can see how it would strike you wrong though. That's serious business.

  20. #1595
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    Silicosis and silicosis-associated lung cancer can develop after heavy occupational exposure, unlike asbestos-related lung cancer and mesothelioma, which have been seen after limited short term exposure. So not really a concern for the DIYer but wearing at least a dust mask is a good idea. So is scoring and snapping instead of cutting when possible.

  21. #1596
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    Oct 2002
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    Apologies for any offense. It was an insensitive way to express my rabid hate for the dust that shit creates.

    I did use an N95 mask, but I’m not convinced that the cheap masks are adequate. I had a hack after cutting a bunch of board, so I sported for a cartridge mask with a proper rubber seal.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  22. #1597
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Apologies for any offense. It was an insensitive way to express my rabid hate for the dust that shit creates.

    I did use an N95 mask, but I’m not convinced that the cheap masks are adequate. I had a hack after cutting a bunch of board, so I sported for a cartridge mask with a proper rubber seal.
    I haven't used a mask or respirator the three times I've worked with backerboard. I learned after the first time not to saw simple square pieces. But then I used to work summers as a laborer in the coal handling department of Great Lakes Steel, which involved shoveling coal dust and blasting coal dust packed on the walls of coal bins with compressed air, with either no or inadequate dust masks, so I figured a little more silica from the backerboard wasn't going to do much more damage. Glad you're more careful than I am. I guess I'm like the gaper who skis the backcountry without any training or gear.

    In the maker space I volunteer in I see a lot of the younger woodworkers using full respirators for cutting non-exotic species on the table saw. I commend them for taking better care of themselves than I do. Now if they would just start using the blade guard (it is a Saw Stop though).

  23. #1598
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    Oct 2002
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    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Wall tile question. I want to avoid a half tile at the top, so can I start with a half tile on the bottom? Wall is 80 1/8” tall, tiles are 3.94” plus .125” spacers. That puts me at 19.5 tiles, right? What am I not considering?
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  24. #1599
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    Oct 2008
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    off on yet another Tangent
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Wall tile question. I want to avoid a half tile at the top, so can I start with a half tile on the bottom? Wall is 80 1/8” tall, tiles are 3.94” plus .125” spacers. That puts me at 19.5 tiles, right? What am I not considering?
    Variables. In the event things don't add up exactly, you may still need to cut the last tile. Top/down, then cut?
    Best regards, Terry
    (Direct Contact is best vs PMs)

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  25. #1600
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    Just do top down and use some tile baseboard in front of it at the bottom

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