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  1. #1601
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Making the Bowl Great Again
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    12,089
    I would do it so you get a full tile above the tub or countertop.

  2. #1602
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    8,402
    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    I would do it so you get a full tile above the tub or countertop.
    It's a wall surround for a tub that goes to the ceiling. So, partial tile at the top?
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  3. #1603
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    11,268
    Seems like you'd notice the partial tile less if it's at the top. People look down a lot more than they look up.

  4. #1604
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    6,137
    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    It's a wall surround for a tub that goes to the ceiling. So, partial tile at the top?
    It depends, usually I split the difference. What is your detail next to the tub where the bullnose (if any) goes to the floor? What type of tile is it? How level is the tub? How plumb or the corners? How level is the ceiling? Are you painting the room or not?

    It is easiest to figure it out if you have a place to dry set your tiles for a mock up. Usually it is best to cut all your tiles in the same row/column to the same number and have any variances taken up by the grout. Normally I will just snap a line for the first row then start straight stay straight. Keep in mind that the tiles are most likely not all the same size so you'll have to do a bit of magic to make it awesome.

  5. #1605
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whistler
    Posts
    2,057
    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    Wall tile question. I want to avoid a half tile at the top, so can I start with a half tile on the bottom? Wall is 80 1/8 tall, tiles are 3.94 plus .125 spacers. That puts me at 19.5 tiles, right? What am I not considering?
    2" (or what ever you space you need) of decorative inlay somewhere in the middle so you can run a full tile top and bottom. Thats what that strip is for, to adjust spacing to get full tiles/reduce cuts/waste.
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  6. #1606
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    8,402
    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Hubbs View Post
    2" (or what ever you space you need) of decorative inlay somewhere in the middle so you can run a full tile top and bottom. Thats what that strip is for, to adjust spacing to get full tiles/reduce cuts/waste.
    Yeah, this is what I'm gonna do. Thanks.

    Another tile question. I have a sliding tile cutter, which isn't great for trimming 1/8-1/4" off a tile. I was able to score the tile and then use the nippers to get the height I want, but the edge is pretty rough. No big chunks, just a jagged edge. How much can I rely on the caulk to cover that up? My co-worker has agreed to go halfsies on a wet saw, but I've already got everything cut and lined up, so I'm not sure I need to go that route.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  7. #1607
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Making the Bowl Great Again
    Posts
    12,089
    I wouldn't count on caulk working. Angle grinders with appropriate diamond wheels work fine for a limited amount of tile cutting (do it outside) if you already have a grinder.

  8. #1608
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whistler
    Posts
    2,057
    ^2nd the angle grinder. Go to a good manufactures web site that describes the blades to pick the right one.
    The proper diamond blade will clean up the edges nicely.

  9. #1609
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    844
    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    I would do it so you get a full tile above the tub or countertop.
    x2. Chances are the tub edge is more level and straighter than the ceiling.

  10. #1610
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Alpental
    Posts
    3,558
    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    I wouldn't count on caulk working. Angle grinders with appropriate diamond wheels work fine for a limited amount of tile cutting (do it outside) if you already have a grinder.
    A Multimaster with a carbide blade works great too
    I have a responsibility to not be intimidated and bullied by low life losers who abuse what little power is granted to them as ski patrollers.

  11. #1611
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    The land of Genesee Cream Ale and homemade pierogies!
    Posts
    1,686

    Pedestal Sinks and drain traps

    Saw an interesting arrangement on a pedestal sink and thought, ok why not.

    Sink was in a half bath on a first floor. The hot, cold and drain came up through the floor, not horizontally out of a wall. Underneath the first floor was an unfinished basement, and the drain trap was just below the surface of the first floor substrate.

    Had someone search the codes for the the local area to see if a drain trap can be below the plane of the floor, response was 'nothing says you can't do it this way.' Which leads to yes, that has advantages, big one being you do not have to remove the sink to get to the trap or hardware -- there was no hardware the pop-up in the sink was spring loaded with no handle.

    Am I missing any reason you do not want to do this?
    The best argument in favour of a 90% tax rate on the rich is a five-minute chat with the average rich person.

    - Winston Churchill, paraphrased.

  12. #1612
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Bozone
    Posts
    1,082
    off the top of my head - IRC says max vertical distance from drain to entrance of trap is 24".

  13. #1613
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    The land of Genesee Cream Ale and homemade pierogies!
    Posts
    1,686
    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    off the top of my head - IRC says max vertical distance from drain to entrance of trap is 24".
    Looking at IRC Chap 32 Traps, all I see is the minimum sizing by plumbing fixture, e.g., Clothes Washer Standpipe, 2 in., and number of fixtures per trap

    No mention of distance from fixture to trap, which is odd.
    The best argument in favour of a 90% tax rate on the rich is a five-minute chat with the average rich person.

    - Winston Churchill, paraphrased.

  14. #1614
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Bozone
    Posts
    1,082

  15. #1615
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Movin' On
    Posts
    2,261
    I'm about to have a small guest bathroom remodeled. It currently has 60 inch vanity with a single sink, a toilet and a small 30 inch wide cast iron alcove tub. The current setup leaves almost no room between the vanity, toilet and tub.

    The tub is fine. Cast iron is nice and lasts forever. It is really small though. I'm going to replace the toilet no matter what.

    I'm kinda stuck between either-
    A- Keeping the existing tub and replacing the vanity with a 60 inch double sink vanity.
    B- Moving to a 48 inch vanity, moving the toilet over and replacing the tub with an expanded tub like this. The tub would be acrylic, but deeper and much wider.

    Unfortunately, there aren't expanded width tubs that I've found made out of cast iron. Also, there is a bit of an unknown about how easy it will be to move the toilet since I don't know what the layout of floor joists is in that bathroom.

    What say you mags? Go with a smaller vanity and bigger acrylic tub OR keep the cast iron tub and go with a nicer, bigger vanity. It'll probably cost me about $1.5k extra in parts and labor to go with a bigger tub.

  16. #1616
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    11,268
    Double sinks will get used multiple times every day. Tub will get used, what, a couple times a week, maybe? You and the Mrs. would need to really like baths to make that worth it, IMO.

  17. #1617
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    4,561
    Quote Originally Posted by Dantheman View Post
    Double sinks will get used multiple times every day. Tub will get used, what, a couple times a week, maybe? You and the Mrs. would need to really like baths to make that worth it, IMO.
    Guest bathroom? I'd wager that tub NEVER gets used for actual baths.

    We have a tub in our *master* bath and it has probably been used 10 times in 15 years.

  18. #1618
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    11,268
    Oh, I glossed over the "guest" part. Yeah, an extra $1,500 to put a big tub in guest bathroom seems nuts.

  19. #1619
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Movin' On
    Posts
    2,261
    Also of note- 3 years ago I had the master bathroom remodeled and removed the tub from that bathroom altogether. This will be the only bathtub on the top floor of the house.

    Perhaps also of note- what I'm referring to as a "guest bathroom" would be the "kids bathroom" for any family living in my house (I live alone currently). The layout of my house is 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms on the top floor, 1/2 bath on the main level and 1 bedroom/1 bathroom in the basement.

    I've got coworkers telling me that oversized tubs are the way to go because they are a major selling point for resale (I have no idea), but if I imagine kids needing to get ready in the morning having two sinks seems to be the way to go.

  20. #1620
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    4,561
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevo View Post
    Also of note- 3 years ago I had the master bathroom remodeled and removed the tub from that bathroom altogether. This will be the only bathtub on the top floor of the house.

    Perhaps also of note- what I'm referring to as a "guest bathroom" would be the "kids bathroom" for any family living in my house (I live alone currently). The layout of my house is 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms on the top floor, 1/2 bath on the main level and 1 bedroom/1 bathroom in the basement.
    Leave the little tub.

  21. #1621
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    844
    Two sinks, keep the tub. If you pull up the tub, inevitably the subfloor will be damaged (water or otherwise), so that will need a fix plus new surround tile. Much easier to add a sink.

  22. #1622
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    10,630

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Someone talk to me about sinks. Im just freshening up the kitchen with new paint everywhere and new appliances. We have an old double tub stainless steel sink that I would ideally like to turn into a clean white sink. Not sure of style yet. The stainless steel looks dated but of course its good against stains and chips, etc.

    What is the best material option these days for durability outside of SS. Ill never live it down if I put in a new one and it stains, scratches and chips.

    Also, what am I looking at for labor if I take this on myself. Id convert to one single sink with garbage disposal. Not too bad for someone who doesnt mind taking on the challenge?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  23. #1623
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    The Cone of Uncertainty
    Posts
    47,991
    https://julien.ca/en/accueil/

    they are pimp. Hire somebody to install it, come on man.

    white? No. Hard no.

  24. #1624
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    12,443

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Nice big fireclay farmhouse sink?

    (Can undermount if you dont want the farmhouse look)

  25. #1625
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    15,307
    Quote Originally Posted by Art Shirk View Post
    Someone talk to me about sinks. Im just freshening up the kitchen with new paint everywhere and new appliances. We have an old double tub stainless steel sink that I would ideally like to turn into a clean white sink. Not sure of style yet. The stainless steel looks dated but of course its good against stains and chips, etc.

    What is the best material option these days for durability outside of SS. Ill never live it down if I put in a new one and it stains, scratches and chips.

    Also, what am I looking at for labor if I take this on myself. Id convert to one single sink with garbage disposal. Not too bad for someone who doesnt mind taking on the challenge?


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Drop in or under mount? Im not stainless fan either. If you still have flexibility there are usually some great deals on eBay and Craigs on plumbing. Ive saved thousands sourcing stuff for my remodeling projects.

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