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  1. #1126
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    DJSapp is online now (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    I need some wisdom from the collective on attic ventilation.

    I live in an old-ass bungalow - my neighborhood was built out in the early 1900s. About 7 or 8 years ago, the city gave us a weatherization loan, and we had the attic insulated with sprayed in foam insulation. I don't remember the promised r-value, but we have maybe 5 or 6 inches of foam up there, which was applied to the floor of the attic.

    At the time we had the foam installed, the contractor told me we needed additional roof jacks because the attic installation wasn't up to code, and we had them do that work as well. FWIW, the contractor was essentially chosen by the city - they had approved a small number of contractors to participate in this weatherization program and we didn't have a choice in which one did the work.

    At any rate, I haven't given it much thought since the work was done - the house is noticeably better insulated and quieter, and I thought that was the end of it. But today, I went up in the attic because I thought we might have a squirrel issue, and it was well over 100 degrees, maybe pushing 110. It shouldn't be that hot: we had a few hot days earlier this week, but it's been pretty cool since then - high around 80 and nights in the 50s.

    With that in mind, I looked around and we definitely have all the promised roof jacks, which are installed near the roof peak, but I'm pretty sure the contractor foamed over the eave vents: I can't see any daylight around the eaves, and there are no baffles or anything like that to allow airflow in from the eave vents. That's what I get for not going up there to look it over after the work was done.

    Given that this was something like a $4k project 8 years ago, I figure it's a waste of time to contact the contractor, so how should I proceed?

    I'm pretty sure of the diagnosis, but what should I do to confirm there's an issue, and what's the fix? My first thought is to go around the outside of the house, pull off the eave vents, and use a jab saw or maybe an auger bit to open a channel for airflow. Am I on the right track?

    TIA for all wisdom and amusing snark.
    Hot wire saw is the tool for cutting out the extra foam. No dusty mess as you melt through the foam cutting the vents back out.

    Don't set your house on fire. Keep it moving and mind where you set it. If access is that tight, just drill through it with the largest wood boring bit you have and deal with the dust and crumbs from the foam.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using TGR Forums mobile app
    Fat fuck bubbas are not erosion.

  2. #1127
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    pdx
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    11,615
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    I need some wisdom from the collective on attic ventilation.

    I live in an old-ass bungalow - my neighborhood was built out in the early 1900s. About 7 or 8 years ago, the city gave us a weatherization loan, and we had the attic insulated with sprayed in foam insulation. I don't remember the promised r-value, but we have maybe 5 or 6 inches of foam up there, which was applied to the floor of the attic.

    At the time we had the foam installed, the contractor told me we needed additional roof jacks because the attic installation wasn't up to code, and we had them do that work as well. FWIW, the contractor was essentially chosen by the city - they had approved a small number of contractors to participate in this weatherization program and we didn't have a choice in which one did the work.

    At any rate, I haven't given it much thought since the work was done - the house is noticeably better insulated and quieter, and I thought that was the end of it. But today, I went up in the attic because I thought we might have a squirrel issue, and it was well over 100 degrees, maybe pushing 110. It shouldn't be that hot: we had a few hot days earlier this week, but it's been pretty cool since then - high around 80 and nights in the 50s.

    With that in mind, I looked around and we definitely have all the promised roof jacks, which are installed near the roof peak, but I'm pretty sure the contractor foamed over the eave vents: I can't see any daylight around the eaves, and there are no baffles or anything like that to allow airflow in from the eave vents. That's what I get for not going up there to look it over after the work was done.

    Given that this was something like a $4k project 8 years ago, I figure it's a waste of time to contact the contractor, so how should I proceed?

    I'm pretty sure of the diagnosis, but what should I do to confirm there's an issue, and what's the fix? My first thought is to go around the outside of the house, pull off the eave vents, and use a jab saw or maybe an auger bit to open a channel for airflow. Am I on the right track?

    TIA for all wisdom and amusing snark.
    Pm me - let’s talk

  3. #1128
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    The land of Genesee Cream Ale and homemade pierogies!
    Posts
    1,665
    Elastomeric paint. Is there any hope of finding it for sale in a size of less than 1 gallon? It has to be tintable.

    Sherwin-Williams, Lowes, HD all sell in 1 gal or 5 gal. No quart sizes.
    Last edited by Nobody Famous; 07-04-2019 at 04:57 AM.
    “The best argument in favour of a 90% tax rate on the rich is a five-minute chat with the average rich person.”

    - Winston Churchill, paraphrased.

  4. #1129
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    pdx
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    11,615

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Yes, you should be able to get tintable, but saturated colors may be difficult

    Quarts seem unlikely

  5. #1130
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    The land of Genesee Cream Ale and homemade pierogies!
    Posts
    1,665
    Seeking some tradecraft tips from pro painters.

    What do you do with the film/crust of semi dried paint floating at the top of sealed paint cans that have been sitting around for a few years?

    Put on rubber gloves and use two hands to pull the film out (it's slippery and slimy), use stir sticks to fish it out? Dispose of it how?

    I know the liquid paint under the film is usable, based on seeing old time painters use it. They'd dump the liquid into another can, however I never paid attention to how they handled the crusty/film layer.

    I have two old 5 gallon buckets of some expensive paint, lids were well sealed and tight, age is about three years old based on color formula labels. The crust is maybe 1/8 in thick.
    “The best argument in favour of a 90% tax rate on the rich is a five-minute chat with the average rich person.”

    - Winston Churchill, paraphrased.

  6. #1131
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    11,258
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody Famous View Post
    Seeking some tradecraft tips from pro painters.

    What do you do with the film/crust of semi dried paint floating at the top of sealed paint cans that have been sitting around for a few years?

    Put on rubber gloves and use two hands to pull the film out (it's slippery and slimy), use stir sticks to fish it out? Dispose of it how?

    I know the liquid paint under the film is usable, based on seeing old time painters use it. They'd dump the liquid into another can, however I never paid attention to how they handled the crusty/film layer.

    I have two old 5 gallon buckets of some expensive paint, lids were well sealed and tight, age is about three years old based on color formula labels. The crust is maybe 1/8 in thick.
    Mesh paint strainer bag. Any paint store will have. Pour through into new can and discard the strainer or wash if so inclined.

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    I wish i could be like SkiFishBum

  7. #1132
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    The Bull City
    Posts
    3,571
    Losing the battle of patch and pray with our 20 year old roof. Every time I find one and reglue the shingles where water was seeping in at the nails under them another one pops up. Two right at the edge of the gutters on opposite sides of the house had water dribbling down the walls yesterday. Time to throw in the towel and just replace the entire roof. Getting estimates for strip and shingle versus metal. The wood around the edges under the trim will also need replacing so probably new gutters too.
    Go that way really REALLY fast. If something gets in your way, TURN!

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