Page 201 of 224 FirstFirst ... 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 ... LastLast
Results 5,001 to 5,025 of 5593
  1. #5001
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    2,653
    Quote Originally Posted by Bunion 2020 View Post
    My 15 year old door split this summer when the wind blew it shut and the dead bolt as out. Headed to the Depot and bought a new one and hung it 2 weekends ago. Of course it was 3/4" taller than the old R/O so had to deal with that. Then some of the trim wouldn't work so had to deal with that, of course the trim paint was a difficult match but I managed to get it to work but then I noticed how badly the south side needs a new coat of paint. Couldn't get a good match so now I am painting the entire fucking thing. That will mean painting the trim and re-caulking all the shitty places.
    Only thing I hate more than painting is paying someone to paint.

    Homes are never done.
    Sounds about right. I'm starting a project to re-finish my deck. I can't even get the existing paint off. Home depot paint guy recommended using Behr stripper to remove it. Youtube confirmed it should work great. Didn't work at all. Back to HD where the guy said this Jasco stuff will take paint off anything. Worked a bit better but I had to put all my weight on a scraper to get it off. Took about 3 hrs to scrape a 2ft x 5ft section. Screw that. Turns out previous owner used Behr DeckOver which is super thick and hard to get off. Some research said its hard to get off even with the most coarse sanding discs. Found this one type that was actually in stock locally that is pretty much a masticator that you attach to an angle grinder. Tried it out on a small section tonite and it looks very promising. Can't deal with the side walls or trellis above the deck until I hear back from the HOA about some rotten wood that needs to be replaced. Only been waiting a couple years on that.

  2. #5002
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Down on Electric Avenue
    Posts
    2,785
    Quote Originally Posted by fatnslow View Post
    Anyone doing big rooms should invest in a 18" roller and pan. It speeds things up significantly.
    FKNA x 10!

    It'll build yer shoulders up too.

  3. #5003
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Down on Electric Avenue
    Posts
    2,785
    Quote Originally Posted by evdog View Post
    Sounds about right. I'm starting a project to re-finish my deck. I can't even get the existing paint off. Home depot paint guy recommended using Behr stripper to remove it. Youtube confirmed it should work great. Didn't work at all. Back to HD where the guy said this Jasco stuff will take paint off anything. Worked a bit better but I had to put all my weight on a scraper to get it off. Took about 3 hrs to scrape a 2ft x 5ft section. Screw that. Turns out previous owner used Behr DeckOver which is super thick and hard to get off. Some research said its hard to get off even with the most coarse sanding discs. Found this one type that was actually in stock locally that is pretty much a masticator that you attach to an angle grinder. Tried it out on a small section tonite and it looks very promising. Can't deal with the side walls or trellis above the deck until I hear back from the HOA about some rotten wood that needs to be replaced. Only been waiting a couple years on that.

    I might suggest a floor drum sander rental from the HD.

    The Marine spar varnish on my sister's deck was bulletproof so I set the nails and got busy. Hang on until ya learn to finesse it, not that hard and a short learning curve.

  4. #5004
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    in a freezer in Italy
    Posts
    3,483
    evdog maybe try a torch on it.

  5. #5005
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    17,763

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    Think about some light grays. Even slightly off white gray. Even more cool and soothing.
    .
    Large bedroom in Palest Pistachio. I like it so much was considering for great room https://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/...?color=2122-60.
    It’s middle right on my color palate

  6. #5006
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    14,371
    Deck over is pure evil.
    It’s like lineX. For decks.

    The only use is a failing deck, to buy a few more years. And even then it sucks.

    Semi solid or solid stain is acceptable.
    “I’m a subhuman jizz monkey”

    Thx mods. It’s an awesome signature.

  7. #5007
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    10,326
    Quote Originally Posted by evdog View Post
    Sounds about right. I'm starting a project to re-finish my deck. I can't even get the existing paint off. Home depot paint guy recommended using Behr stripper to remove it. Youtube confirmed it should work great. Didn't work at all. Back to HD where the guy said this Jasco stuff will take paint off anything. Worked a bit better but I had to put all my weight on a scraper to get it off. Took about 3 hrs to scrape a 2ft x 5ft section. Screw that. Turns out previous owner used Behr DeckOver which is super thick and hard to get off. Some research said its hard to get off even with the most coarse sanding discs. Found this one type that was actually in stock locally that is pretty much a masticator that you attach to an angle grinder. Tried it out on a small section tonite and it looks very promising. Can't deal with the side walls or trellis above the deck until I hear back from the HOA about some rotten wood that needs to be replaced. Only been waiting a couple years on that.
    I spent the better part of a summer trying to strip our deck. Local hardware stores stopped renting floor sanders, because people fuck them up and don't clean them. Also, they don't work very well unless the deck is perfectly flat, which mine definitely wasn't. I spent a ton of time and money on paint stripper, and went through two belt sanders, and some hand sanders before I got it all mostly cleared up. Stained it and now I still have to stain it again every other year.

    IMHO, next time I'm ripping it all up and putting down trex. YMMV

  8. #5008
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Stumptown
    Posts
    7,091
    Quote Originally Posted by fatnslow View Post
    Anyone doing big rooms should invest in a 18" roller and pan. It speeds things up significantly.
    We sprayed our house. Took us most of a day to tape everything off and about an hour and a half to spray the whole thing including figuring out how to use it. Other than a couple of drips it worked out great. About 10x the cost of a roller but worth the time savings

    Turned our garage into a dexter killing room and did all the doors in there.

  9. #5009
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,482
    Quote Originally Posted by Supermoon View Post
    We sprayed our house. Took us most of a day to tape everything off and about an hour and a half to spray the whole thing including figuring out how to use it. Other than a couple of drips it worked out great. About 10x the cost of a roller but worth the time savings

    Turned our garage into a dexter killing room and did all the doors in there.
    You can also hook up a roller to a airless and forego a fuckload of masking. Walls should be backrolled when spraying anyway

  10. #5010
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Stumptown
    Posts
    7,091
    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    You can also hook up a roller to a airless and forego a fuckload of masking. Walls should be backrolled when spraying anyway
    Oh I’m sure people who know what they’re doing can bang that stuff out much better/faster

  11. #5011
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,744
    I have 3 projects that need doing in the next year or so. I am no tradesman, but i am an engineer, and typically do well DIYing, though i dont really enjoy it at all. I will also have a newborn anyday now. Are any of these worth worth DIYing, or is the risk/reward ratio skewed in favor of shelling out for a pro:

    1) replace 2 hose bibs. currently stripped (only operated with pliers) and or leaky. 1 is easy access from the garage, the other should likely be accessed through the crawlspace that is apparently filthy with rodent droppings and mummified corpses according to the home inspector that did the inspection a couple months ago- i doubt it will be easy access.

    2) install a PRV on the water service line into the house. Can probably be installed on the line as it enters the garage- looks to be easy access, but could be a big fuckup if done wrong and i have no specific tools or prior knowledge.

    3) Hardwire a circuit from the garage (where the breaker is) to the outdoor patio at the back of the house (run the conduit external to house) to run speakers, lights and a couple infrared heaters.

  12. #5012
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    14,391
    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    You can also hook up a roller to a airless and forego a fuckload of masking. Walls should be backrolled when spraying anyway
    this man understands....backroll it all...
    TGR MODS EAT SKIDOG JIZZ

  13. #5013
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    10,952
    Talk to me about roof snow guards. I have a ribbed metal roof that drops snow in front of my garage doors. Needs some sort of snow retention system.

    Roof is roughly 34' wide x 14' run. Roughly 4:12 pitch. Snow load is about 75 psf.

    Any reason to go with the individual "cleat" style guards vs. continuous snow fences across the entire width? Or maybe a combination of cleats with a continuous fence at the bottom edge? It's not a standing seam roof, so any option is going to get screwed in through the metal roofing.

  14. #5014
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the ham
    Posts
    10,374
    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    Windows aside, that is a decent Tyvek job. I assume they will come back and tape the seams properly and Flexwrap the window framing before installing the remaining windows.
    I hate it when they don't line up the sheets, or god forbid put a section on upside down.

    Edit...uh-oh...on closer inspection did they wrap the framing before they put in the existing windows??
    Quote Originally Posted by tuco View Post
    Yeah, I was thinking same. Should be wrapped and overlapped to a window sill pan.
    That pic was taken at max zoom on my phone, so I was too far away to see all the details IRL, but I did manage to get a closer look over the weekend. The Tyvek is good from far, far from good. Lots of wrinkles, sloppy cuts, etc. As for the window installation, the upstairs and downstairs windows are installed with different products. The ground floor windows are all done with Vycor (or similar) and have corner cuts, and the Tyvek wasn't wrapped over the cripples. It's ok though, it never rains here.

  15. #5015
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,943
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Talk to me about roof snow guards. I have a ribbed metal roof that drops snow in front of my garage doors. Needs some sort of snow retention system.

    Roof is roughly 34' wide x 14' run. Roughly 4:12 pitch. Snow load is about 75 psf.

    Any reason to go with the individual "cleat" style guards vs. continuous snow fences across the entire width? Or maybe a combination of cleats with a continuous fence at the bottom edge? It's not a standing seam roof, so any option is going to get screwed in through the metal roofing.
    Fwiw and ymmv. I have a slate roof (so slippery like metal) and we had the cleat style guards. I have about 70 of the goddamn things in my shed now. I took them all off because when the avalanche eventually starts it rips the cleats out and damages the slate. I discovered I'd rather shovel than fix the roof slate. My neighbor who has asphalt shingle, doesn't have this issue because shingles "grip" the snow.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Striker View Post
    That pic was taken at max zoom on my phone, so I was too far away to see all the details IRL, but I did manage to get a closer look over the weekend. The Tyvek is good from far, far from good. Lots of wrinkles, sloppy cuts, etc. As for the window installation, the upstairs and downstairs windows are installed with different products. The ground floor windows are all done with Vycor (or similar) and have corner cuts, and the Tyvek wasn't wrapped over the cripples. It's ok though, it never rains here.
    This is very disappointing to hear. They spring for a top quality house wrap and then do shit like that. Should have gone with tar paper to keep the materials quality on par with the installation.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  16. #5016
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    17,763
    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    I have 3 projects that need doing in the next year or so. I am no tradesman, but i am an engineer, and typically do well DIYing, though i dont really enjoy it at all. I will also have a newborn anyday now. Are any of these worth worth DIYing, or is the risk/reward ratio skewed in favor of shelling out for a pro:

    1) replace 2 hose bibs. currently stripped (only operated with pliers) and or leaky. 1 is easy access from the garage, the other should likely be accessed through the crawlspace that is apparently filthy with rodent droppings and mummified corpses according to the home inspector that did the inspection a couple months ago- i doubt it will be easy access.

    2) install a PRV on the water service line into the house. Can probably be installed on the line as it enters the garage- looks to be easy access, but could be a big fuckup if done wrong and i have no specific tools or prior knowledge.

    3) Hardwire a circuit from the garage (where the breaker is) to the outdoor patio at the back of the house (run the conduit external to house) to run speakers, lights and a couple infrared heaters.
    I've changed hose bibs with a vice grip and I'm pretty lame.

  17. #5017
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,964
    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    I have 3 projects that need doing in the next year or so. I am no tradesman, but i am an engineer, and typically do well DIYing, though i dont really enjoy it at all. I will also have a newborn anyday now. Are any of these worth worth DIYing, or is the risk/reward ratio skewed in favor of shelling out for a pro:

    1) replace 2 hose bibs. currently stripped (only operated with pliers) and or leaky. 1 is easy access from the garage, the other should likely be accessed through the crawlspace that is apparently filthy with rodent droppings and mummified corpses according to the home inspector that did the inspection a couple months ago- i doubt it will be easy access.

    2) install a PRV on the water service line into the house. Can probably be installed on the line as it enters the garage- looks to be easy access, but could be a big fuckup if done wrong and i have no specific tools or prior knowledge.

    3) Hardwire a circuit from the garage (where the breaker is) to the outdoor patio at the back of the house (run the conduit external to house) to run speakers, lights and a couple infrared heaters.
    1. Depending on type of supply line that is connected to the hose bid it can be 10 minutes or all kinds of punishment. IF you're not super sure about it all you might be able to source the same fixture and just replace the shut off valve.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2afHjjI2b3w

    2. Again, this is depending on what you have going in the house.

    3. You need to find out how many amps the heaters will be pulling and consider using a dedicated breaker for the heater(s).
    Last edited by fatnslow; 09-08-2021 at 11:44 AM.

  18. #5018
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    13,943
    Quote Originally Posted by 4matic View Post
    I've changed hose bibs with a vice grip and I'm pretty lame.
    Just make sure they're not soldered on.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

  19. #5019
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    10,952
    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    Fwiw and ymmv. I have a slate roof (so slippery like metal) and we had the cleat style guards. I have about 70 of the goddamn things in my shed now. I took them all off because when the avalanche eventually starts it rips the cleats out and damages the slate. I discovered I'd rather shovel than fix the roof slate. My neighbor who has asphalt shingle, doesn't have this issue because shingles "grip" the snow.
    Yeah, I've heard similar stories of cleats and fences ripping out. But it seems like there's gotta be some sort of system that's adequately fastened to the roof. The way our driveway is situated, there isn't a particularly convenient place to shovel / blow snow to. It'd be a whole lot nicer if the snow just stayed up there.

  20. #5020
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    15,840
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Yeah, I've heard similar stories of cleats and fences ripping out. But it seems like there's gotta be some sort of system that's adequately fastened to the roof. The way our driveway is situated, there isn't a particularly convenient place to shovel / blow snow to. It'd be a whole lot nicer if the snow just stayed up there.
    how close is your roof to replacement?
    that would be the time to put a well-anchored rentention system in there, properly detailed with the new roofing system

  21. #5021
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    196
    Quote Originally Posted by 4matic View Post
    Painting begins today. Start with 20 gallons. Walls, ceiling, and trim all in BM Super White Pre Mix. Everything matte finish except the trim and fireplace in semi.

    Top middle on the far wall

    Attachment 384749
    Personally i would wrap those 4 columns in drywall and texture

  22. #5022
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Hell Track
    Posts
    10,952
    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    how close is your roof to replacement?
    that would be the time to put a well-anchored rentention system in there, properly detailed with the new roofing system
    It was brand new last year.

    Contractor was supposed to put in snow guards but obviously didn't. That's a rant for another thread though.

  23. #5023
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the ham
    Posts
    10,374
    Quote Originally Posted by Timberridge View Post
    This is very disappointing to hear. They spring for a top quality house wrap and then do shit like that. Should have gone with tar paper to keep the materials quality on par with the installation.
    The quality of construction has always been mixed in this town. The two guys who framed it seemed pretty good, but the subs are always another story. I'm not sure if there even is a GC or if the owners are doing it ad hoc. It sure looks like they designed it themselves, because there are so many impractical design elements it's The Homer car of houses.

    The main roof has six gables with steep pitches (naked eye guesstimate 9 or 10/12). There's a seventh gable over one of the main floor areas that sticks out of the side of the building like an addition, that has hips on its corners. The carport (which is really an outdoor living area) has a full hipped roof. And there's a Tudor swoop over the main entrance.

    Needless to say, there's no practical place to put a solar panel (big what were you thinking?! on a new build in this town).

    It's only two storeys, but the roof is so tall there's enough lumber for three - but hey, wood's cheap, right?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	HomerHouse.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	438.7 KB 
ID:	384815
    Last edited by Ted Striker; 09-08-2021 at 06:34 PM.

  24. #5024
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,642
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Striker View Post
    The quality of construction has always been mixed in this town. The two guys who framed it seemed pretty good, but the subs are always another story. I'm not sure if there even is a GC or if the owners are doing it ad hoc. It sure looks like they designed it themselves, because there are so many impractical design elements it's The Homer car of houses.

    The main roof has six gables with steep pitches (naked eye guesstimate 9 or 10/12). There's a fifth gable over one of the main floor areas that sticks out of the side of the building like an addition, that has hips on its corners. The carport (which is really an outdoor living area) has a full hipped roof. And there's a Tudor swoop over the main entrance.

    Needless to say, there's no practical place to put a solar panel (big what were you thinking?! on a new build in this town).

    It's only two storeys, but the roof is so tall there's enough lumber for three - but hey, wood's cheap, right?

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	HomerHouse.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	438.7 KB 
ID:	384815
    OK, $950k, but that's as high as I'm going to go

  25. #5025
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    15,840
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    It was brand new last year.

    Contractor was supposed to put in snow guards but obviously didn't. That's a rant for another thread though.
    the other issue is whether you have a cold roof or not
    because retaining snow when it has a heat source just beneath it can be problematic too

    (i'm not helping here, sorry)

    there are companies that do these retrofit installs and should provide warrantable work, but they are going to limit the liability since they didn't install the roof -- my guess is any reasonable solution may involve installing blocking in between the attic joists & lagging through a little puddle of sealant to secure the guards wherever the module hits. Attaching purely to the sheetmetal would be a non-starter for me.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •