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  1. #5901
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    Dec 2006
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    good advice on this, the house is livable as is so might have to wait a bit. Need to get it done soonish as we also want to install a heat pump in place of the oil burner and attic insulation after rewiring. Biggest issue will be finding an outlet that is safe to charge our electric car in the current system.

    Quote Originally Posted by anotherVTskibum View Post
    Can't speak to Seattle, but around here, anyone available to take that on in a reasonable timeframe would probably be a second- or third-tier contractor; the better ones are booked out for months at least. So anyone who was available really quickly would be a red flag for me unless they had just gotten pushed back on a job due to other delays.

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  2. #5902
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    Jan 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by old_newguy View Post
    I just added a roof penetration and piped mine out the roof yesterday.

    It’s a ~2 hour DIY job if you have a asphalt shingle roof.
    Yeah, it's an easy job. Use metal duct or flex metal tube to keep any future critters from chewing it up.

  3. #5903
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustonen View Post
    My bathroom fans are venting into the attic. Itís obviously not a new situation, and I donít see any obvious evidence of mold up there. I discovered this when I went to replace one of the fans. Along with an old squirrel carcass. Thoughts?
    I recommend removing the squirrel carcass.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  4. #5904
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    Sep 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Striker View Post
    Plus age. The workmanship tended to be very good because people were generally more afraid of electricity than they are now, but at this point most k&t insulation is brittle af, and even the conductors can't stand up to much bending.

    That said, anything that's inaccessible that hasn't been messed with is probably fine. But it'd be best to isolate that circuit as much as possible. Also, some k&t installations have switched neutrals.
    Wasn't knob and tube the stuff with cloth insulation?

    When was the era with aluminum wiring? Another old material I'd just as soon avoid.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  5. #5905
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    my own little world
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    3,758

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Figured you guys wouldnít let me off easy.

    Iím about 16 feet from the gable end. This would be easier for a couple reasons, AND we get enough snow where I am that I worry about keeping it clear if I put it on the roof. Any reason not to just send it out the gable?

    I charted out fan capacity, bathroom size, and vent run length and that seems to all be fine.
    focus.

  6. #5906
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    my own little world
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    3,758
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    I recommend removing the squirrel carcass.
    The carcass was removed. That wasnít very pleasant.
    focus.

  7. #5907
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    2 hours to Whiteface
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    543
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustonen View Post
    My bathroom fans are venting into the attic. Itís obviously not a new situation, and I donít see any obvious evidence of mold up there. I discovered this when I went to replace one of the fans. Along with an old squirrel carcass. Thoughts?
    Well, I just spent about $4000 getting the mold, which stemmed from two bathroom. Fans venting into the attic, remediated.

    So, I would say vent the fucking fans properly ASAP. Or just dont look in your attic for 10 years and then write a check.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  8. #5908
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Tahoe-ish
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    Not all places are susceptible to mold. I've been tearing up houses for over a dozen years here in arid NV, and I've never seen more than a few square inches of it. So YMMV.

    But of course the fans should be properly vented. Go out the gable if the distance is ok, and use a cap with a damper.
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  9. #5909
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    the ham
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    edit: didn't scroll far enough... ^^^ what he said
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustonen View Post
    I’m about 16 feet from the gable end. This would be easier for a couple reasons, AND we get enough snow where I am that I worry about keeping it clear if I put it on the roof. Any reason not to just send it out the gable?

    I charted out fan capacity, bathroom size, and vent run length and that seems to all be fine.
    Yeah, lots of houses around here route them through a side wall (including mine). Just get a nice metal vent. The plastic ones don't hold paint well, and get brittle/fall apart.

  10. #5910
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    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    Make sure to vent away from any existing gable vents. Depending on your setup, it could end up sucking that wet air back in.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  11. #5911
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    Dec 2007
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    What's the collective wisdom on this scenario:

    We're in a ~40 year old house. There are three separate rooms that I'll be remodeling over the next few years. Each room will be it's own remodel project (I'll probably do one room / year), partly to bite of manageable chunks, and partly to avoid turning a large part of the house into a construction zone for an extended period. Portions of the house have pine flooring, and all three of the rooms to be remodeled touch that pine flooring (although the pine only extends into one of the rooms). I want to extend the wood flooring into each of the to-be-remodeled rooms.

    So how do I deal with the flooring? I'm fine with the pine, but I'm not overly attached to it. Does it seem reasonable to try to match the pine flooring and extend it into each room as I work on them? Or is trying to match pine flooring going to be a disaster and I should just replace all the flooring at once? But the latter option presents issues with not doing all the projects at once...

  12. #5912
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    Mar 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    Wasn't knob and tube the stuff with cloth insulation?

    When was the era with aluminum wiring? Another old material I'd just as soon avoid.
    Yes.

    Mid 60s to early 70s, and it's my understanding that it was shitty wire - as in the manufacturing/alloy wasn't up to the task, and thermal expansion/contraction caused creep, i.e. loose connections.

    There isn't anything inherently wrong with aluminum conductors, but it's not particularly well suited to branch circuits in your home (especially in wet climates) due to the nature of how it corrodes (becomes less conducive, and generates heat). That makes the terminations more finicky to do right.

    My experience with it is pretty limited though. I don't know if it wasn't popular on the (north) west coast, or if those houses have been torn (or burned) down, or what. I've easily pulled more than a mile of n&t out of old houses over the years, but not that much al.

  13. #5913
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    1,848
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    What's the collective wisdom on this scenario:

    We're in a ~40 year old house. There are three separate rooms that I'll be remodeling over the next few years. Each room will be it's own remodel project (I'll probably do one room / year), partly to bite of manageable chunks, and partly to avoid turning a large part of the house into a construction zone for an extended period. Portions of the house have pine flooring, and all three of the rooms to be remodeled touch that pine flooring (although the pine only extends into one of the rooms). I want to extend the wood flooring into each of the to-be-remodeled rooms.

    So how do I deal with the flooring? I'm fine with the pine, but I'm not overly attached to it. Does it seem reasonable to try to match the pine flooring and extend it into each room as I work on them? Or is trying to match pine flooring going to be a disaster and I should just replace all the flooring at once? But the latter option presents issues with not doing all the projects at once...
    I love getting to kibbitz on other people's projects (and not doing any of the work myself).
    What flooring is in the rooms to be remodeled? Is there going to be a floor height difference that you'll need to address? Are transition strips and possible minor differences OK for you, or do you want the floors to be seamless? Is it possible to find flooring that's a good match for what you have now?

  14. #5914
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    I love getting to kibbitz on other people's projects (and not doing any of the work myself).
    What flooring is in the rooms to be remodeled? Is there going to be a floor height difference that you'll need to address? Are transition strips and possible minor differences OK for you, or do you want the floors to be seamless? Is it possible to find flooring that's a good match for what you have now?
    The pine flooring is pretty standard 3" x 3/4" stuff, so I'm operating on the assumption that I'll be able to match it pretty closely. But, of course, the current stuff has seen plenty of use, so even if I re-finish everything, it'll look a bit different. I *think* I'm ok with that, but it's hard to say how different everything will really look.

    Room #1 to be remodeled has the pine flooring, but has a bunch of cabinets (that the flooring doesn't go under), and I'll be ripping the cabinets out so I'll need to extend the flooring. So in that room, elevations won't be an issue, but the differences in finish will be very apparent. That's also a relatively small room, so I could also just replace all of the flooring in there, which would avoid any issue with miss-matched finishes within that room. Room #2 has linoleum and only touches remodel room #1.

    Remodel Room #3 (living room) is the tricky one; it currently has carpet and touches both Remodel Room #1 (that has the pine flooring that doesn't extend under the cabinets) and the kitchen (which has pine flooring and isn't on the short list for remodeling).

    I think the elevations for the flooring will be fine. I might need a transition strip in each, but it should be pretty close. And this whole house is a hodge podge of work over the years, so transition strips are par for the course.

  15. #5915
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Making the Bowl Great Again
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    13,498
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    So how do I deal with the flooring? I'm fine with the pine, but I'm not overly attached to it. Does it seem reasonable to try to match the pine flooring and extend it into each room as I work on them? Or is trying to match pine flooring going to be a disaster and I should just replace all the flooring at once? But the latter option presents issues with not doing all the projects at once...
    Pics required. I am very interested to see what 40-year-old pine looks like. Is it sanded smooth, or is it "circle sawn" as they say around here? If you don't really care about it and are ok with pre-finished wood, you could get enough to do every room and just install as you go, with thresholds under each door.

  16. #5916
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    Pics required. I am very interested to see what 40-year-old pine looks like. Is it sanded smooth, or is it "circle sawn" as they say around here? If you don't really care about it and are ok with pre-finished wood, you could get enough to do every room and just install as you go, with thresholds under each door.
    Sanded smooth. Not sure what finish they used on it (we've only been in this house for a couple years). While the house is about 40 years old, I'm fairly sure this flooring is newer. I'm not sure how new though - if I had to guess, I'd bet they did it when they did one of the additions in the late 80's.

    This pic is in the kitchen.

  17. #5917
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    In a van... down by the river
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Sanded smooth. Not sure what finish they used on it (we've only been in this house for a couple years). While the house is about 40 years old, I'm fairly sure this flooring is newer. I'm not sure how new though - if I had to guess, I'd bet they did it when they did one of the additions in the late 80's.

    This pic is in the kitchen.
    Taking cue from that photo... you should probably wait about 16 years to do *any* of those projects.


  18. #5918
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    Quote Originally Posted by skaredshtles View Post
    Taking cue from that photo... you should probably wait about 16 years to do *any* of those projects.


    Ha! On one hand, yes. On the other hand, Room #2 to be remodeled is ^^^ their bedroom, so that one will probably get done next spring. And part of that project is installing a lock on my bedroom door so I can finally get some damn sleep.

  19. #5919
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    Dec 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    Ha! On one hand, yes. On the other hand, Room #2 to be remodeled is ^^^ their bedroom, so that one will probably get done next spring. And part of that project is installing a lock on my bedroom door so I can finally get some damn sleep.
    I hear ya, man. May the FSM have mercy on your soul!

  20. #5920
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    Nov 2005
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    toast, the real problem with replicating that floor throughout isn't in sourcing or installing the materials, it's in the on-site finishing required. That is why prefinished flooring make sense, especially in a remodel that will be done a little bit at a time.

  21. #5921
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    toast, the real problem with replicating that floor throughout isn't in sourcing or installing the materials, it's in the on-site finishing required. That is why prefinished flooring make sense, especially in a remodel that will be done a little bit at a time.
    Right on, that makes sense. I guess I'll have to do some shopping around and see what the options are locally for pre-finished flooring that's close to what's in the kitchen.

  22. #5922
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    livin the dream
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    4,820
    The easiest / cost affective would be rootskiers ideaÖ

    However a good flooring guy could harvest the material from room #1 and mix it with a matching new material at each intersection to make them seamlessÖ then refinish everything together at the end.


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  23. #5923
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    Jan 2019
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    Man, trying to get any old and dry fir or pine flooring up in one piece is going to be tough.

  24. #5924
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    The easiest / cost affective would be rootskiers idea…

    However a good flooring guy could harvest the material from room #1 and mix it with a matching new material at each intersection to make them seamless… then refinish everything together at the end.
    Harvesting material from room 1 to blend transitions is an interesting thought that hadn't occurred to me. It would complicate the timing of everything though. If I went the prefinished route, I'd just do the work myself. But I'm not opposed to just letting someone who knows what they're doing take over and do something like that.

    But yeah, like Bandini said, salvaging the wood might be tricky. I have pulled a bit of the pine up from a small bathroom remodel we did and it mostly came up alright, so maybe there's a chance. But it seems pretty likely we'd a least lose a few pieces.

  25. #5925
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    Dec 2012
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    14,473
    Quote Originally Posted by toast2266 View Post
    That don't look like pine boys. It's oak. Stained a more of a golden color and refinished its the nicest floor you can get IMO--short of going exotic.
    "timberridge is terminally vapid" -- a fortune cookie in Yueyang

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