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  1. #7151
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Down on Electric Avenue
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    3,221
    Just the thought of prepping some pallet wood makes me cringe. Often it's tough old oak. The nails are practically epoxied in there and often need a crowbar to separate. Then removing all the metal bits and planing each board...waiting for the one nail to ruin the blade. No thanks.

    The marquetry is nice though. And I've heard some pallets from the far east end up being exotic woods.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Kevo, glad it worked out proper for ya. Was wondering how it went.

  2. #7152
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    7,733
    ^^^ that's why I only use old pallets for drunken fire tomfoolery

    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #7153
    Join Date
    Jan 2022
    Posts
    746
    I too love the smell of chemically treated pallets off gassing in the morning.

  4. #7154
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    19,594
    What's the easy way to remove a Pex stainless band clamp? Replacing a couple of connections in an RV, and don't want to cut the pex tubing any shorter.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  5. #7155
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    The Mayonnaisium
    Posts
    9,712
    ^ If the clamps are the pinch-together variety there is a tool made to close and release them.

  6. #7156
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    19,594
    Quote Originally Posted by Mazderati View Post
    ^ If the clamps are the pinch-together variety there is a tool made to close and release them.
    They're this style:
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/The-Plum...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    I have a crimp tool to fasten them closed, but as best I can tell, the tool does not release the clamps.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  7. #7157
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    The Mayonnaisium
    Posts
    9,712
    Quote Originally Posted by El Chupacabra View Post
    They're this style:
    https://www.homedepot.com/p/The-Plum...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    I have a crimp tool to fasten them closed, but as best I can tell, the tool does not release the clamps.
    Those are different than the automotive cinch clamps I've seen. Looks like the locking tab can be bent up and then clamp removed? At least some of the automotive versions retain some spring so you just use the cinch clamp pliers to add a little tension then release the catch point.


  8. #7158
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    19,594
    Thanks - I've seen those suggestions on removal, but I can't get a screwdriver tip under that end piece (as pictured). I'll try with a larger set of dikes for grabbing onto the band end.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  9. #7159
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Tahoe-ish
    Posts
    2,362
    Cut the band either with a grinder or across the crimped part with sharp angle cutter (ask Gunder for some suggestions).
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  10. #7160
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    17,274
    Dikes is the answer. As you know already.

    Once the clamp is off, use a heat gun to soften the hose.

  11. #7161
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    LV-426
    Posts
    19,594
    Thanks. I should have my new fittings tomorrow from Amazon, so I'll give it a try with dikes. If no go, I have a dremel that'll do it.

    Good tip on the heat gun too, thanks.
    Quote Originally Posted by powder11 View Post
    if you have to resort to taking advice from the nitwits on this forum, then you're doomed.

  12. #7162
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    17,274
    I’m amused that dikes can still be called dikes.

    Is it just a New England thing?
    Grew up Midwest. They were wire cutters there.

  13. #7163
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    5,137
    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    I’m amused that dikes can still be called dikes.

    Is it just a New England thing?
    Grew up Midwest. They were wire cutters there.
    Dike: Diagonal Pliers

    Dike: Bulldyke: Bull Dick: “well dressed man”




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  14. #7164
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Montrose, CO
    Posts
    3,979
    I'm getting a new cedar fence and there is conflicting information regarding sealing/staining on the internet (imagine that!)

    Do I need to stain or seal the fence to maximize life? This is in Western CO, high desert climate. My old house had a cedar fence that I don't think was ever sealed. It had a weathered appearance but was holding up fine and was >10 years old when I sold the place.

    I'd love to skip it since it is a fair amount of work, as long as I won't regret it down the road.

  15. #7165
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    18,128
    Quote Originally Posted by snowaddict91 View Post
    I'm getting a new cedar fence and there is conflicting information regarding sealing/staining on the internet (imagine that!)

    Do I need to stain or seal the fence to maximize life? This is in Western CO, high desert climate. My old house had a cedar fence that I don't think was ever sealed. It had a weathered appearance but was holding up fine and was >10 years old when I sold the place.

    I'd love to skip it since it is a fair amount of work, as long as I won't regret it down the road.
    short answer: yes, if your only goal is maximizing life

    UV will degrade untreated cedar; water isn't the only problem

    in the order of unprotected to most protected:
    unstained
    transparent stain
    semi-transparent stain
    semi-solid stain
    solid stain
    painted

    that all said, untreated cedar is still pretty durable and, imho, the best looking

  16. #7166
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern BC
    Posts
    27,602
    Quote Originally Posted by Djongo Unchained View Post
    Just the thought of prepping some pallet wood makes me cringe. Often it's tough old oak. The nails are practically epoxied in there and often need a crowbar to separate. Then removing all the metal bits and planing each board...waiting for the one nail to ruin the blade. No thanks.

    The marquetry is nice though. And I've heard some pallets from the far east end up being exotic woods.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Kevo, glad it worked out proper for ya. Was wondering how it went.
    My neighbor got some recycled wood from the floor of the B ball court of the defunct Vancover Grizzlies pro team

    really nice stuff, he left the BB court lines on the wood which are all random, it looks kind of cool in an old log house
    Lee Lau - xxx-er is the laziest Asian canuck I know

  17. #7167
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Montrose, CO
    Posts
    3,979
    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    short answer: yes, if your only goal is maximizing life

    UV will degrade untreated cedar; water isn't the only problem

    in the order of unprotected to most protected:
    unstained
    transparent stain
    semi-transparent stain
    semi-solid stain
    solid stain
    painted

    that all said, untreated cedar is still pretty durable and, imho, the best looking
    And that's my conundrum. I'm not going to do anything beyond semi-transparent, and I agree that untreated is the best looking, and IMO matches the character of my house the best. So I guess my question is, what is the real world difference in durability/lifetime between unstained and transparent stain?

  18. #7168
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,835
    In our stupid PNW climate, we get 20-30 years out of cedar fence boards, untreated.

  19. #7169
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    In a van... down by the river
    Posts
    10,311
    On the Front Range it's generally the fence support structure that goes before the cedar slats.

  20. #7170
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,727
    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    short answer: yes, if your only goal is maximizing life

    UV will degrade untreated cedar; water isn't the only problem

    in the order of unprotected to most protected:
    unstained
    transparent stain
    semi-transparent stain
    semi-solid stain
    solid stain
    painted

    that all said, untreated cedar is still pretty durable and, imho, the best looking
    Mostly agree.
    I think treated wood looks better than greyed out wood.
    A painted(paint will provide the most UV protection)fence will rot faster than any other treatment, unless fastidiously maintained! Water will eventually get under the film and not dry out, encouraging rot.

    UV's kills all finishes.
    Also, oil finishes will add elasticity back into the wood, helping w/ cracking/warping

  21. #7171
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Montrose, CO
    Posts
    3,979
    Quote Originally Posted by skaredshtles View Post
    On the Front Range it's generally the fence support structure that goes before the cedar slats.
    Yeah, that's been my experience everywhere I've ever lived, too. That's the whole reason I'm replacing my current fence. Snapped posts everywhere. While the slats are beat up, they could have been reused. My artsy friend took about half the fence to repurpose, since its pretty old with big saw blade cuts. He's gonna tell people its from an old barn in Telluride

  22. #7172
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2,727
    Form the tops of your post bases to shed water away from post and a drainage pad(compactable gravel) @ the bottom of your hole

  23. #7173
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    20,658
    Quote Originally Posted by mattig View Post
    In our stupid PNW climate, we get 20-30 years out of cedar fence boards, untreated.
    Assuming you keep the ends of the boards off the dirt. It's easy to ignore dirt building up against the bottoms of boards that used to be above grade.
    We built a fence with the boards on our side of the supports. Neighbor than puts boards on his side, trapping moisture and debirs, so the post rot above grade. We learned to build fences that look good from the "back" side.

  24. #7174
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    1,835
    Amen. Make the little above grade pyramids on post bases too, like Tuco said.

  25. #7175
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    20,658
    We had a fence built with galvanized steel Z posts. Trimmed out the posts to look like solid wood posts. Should last longer than me.

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