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  1. #5776
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    When you set up the table saw, know what is behind you
    Quote Originally Posted by BC13 View Post
    My buddy is a cabinet maker. All day every daymaking cuts of all types. A few years back he was rushing and got directly behind the blade. The piece kicks back and hits him right in sack. Ruptured his testicle. He had to get a ride to the local hospital and ended up having surgery that night.

    That story always makes me flinch.

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  2. #5777
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    Um...yeah. This is a job site, not a wood shop. Take your apron and go back to calibrating your Saw Stop with the 6' outfeed table.
    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    When you set up the table saw, know what is behind you
    The fact that he asked how to taper the transition piece suggests to me that he is not familiar with making that cut and might appreciate a way to make it safer. I realize that if you use a guard, riving knife, featherboard, saw stop etc you lose your man card but better to lose your man card than your testicle. Still, it is just one piece, if he doesn't fuck it up, so he might get lucky.

    They got upset in the ceramic shop in the Truckee Roundhouse when the table saw in the wood shop sent a board 40 feet through their shop and into the wall. The response was to turn the table saw around so the only person at risk is someone using the miter saw--with their bac turned.

    There are a lot of people who know a table saw can cut your fingers off but not that it can kick back.

    As far as the apron--it is from my junior high shop class. I think I need a bigger one though. I don't have any more room to loosen the tie.

  3. #5778
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    Dec 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC13 View Post
    My buddy is a cabinet maker. All day every daymaking cuts of all types. A few years back he was rushing and got directly behind the blade. The piece kicks back and hits him right in sack. Ruptured his testicle. He had to get a ride to the local hospital and ended up having surgery that night.

    That story always makes me flinch.

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  4. #5779
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    Nov 2003
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    On the topic of table saws, would you rather a modern/new jobsite saw or an older belt driven shop saw? Like this one: https://cnj.craigslist.org/tls/d/cla...405584413.html
    Because rich has nothing to do with money.

  5. #5780
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    Nov 2002
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    7,046
    It is really a question of jobsite vs. shop, carpentry vs. woodworking. Your regular Dewalt, Bosch type table saws are portable. That unit is not.

  6. #5781
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    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Thanks for the tips and table saw humor. I have a healthy fear of the saw. My uncle Henry was missing two fingers from a table saw incident. That made an impression at a young age.

    Iíve been playing with some scrap and think I have a decent system. Still not sure what to do with the door jamb. By the time I got to making room for the hardwood I wanted to be done and may not have fully considered my options.

    Unrelated question. Getting ready to run a water line from the filter to the ice maker (my honey-do list is constantly changing with my wifeís moods). My options are to drill down and route through the crawl space or go laterally through the cabinets and behind the stove. Thoughts?
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  7. #5782
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    Nov 2002
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    Respect...not fear

    'splain that door jamb to me and I'll see if I can help you out. Maybe it is a cased opening.

    I'd guess 1/4 refer supply lines are the most common sources of plumbing leaks. I'd probably go through the cabinets. Use the braided line not the plastic BS. And no saddle tap valves.

  8. #5783
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    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    Respect...not fear

    'splain that door jamb to me and I'll see if I can help you out. Maybe it is a cased opening.

    I'd guess 1/4 refer supply lines are the most common sources of plumbing leaks. I'd probably go through the cabinets. Use the braided line not the plastic BS. And no saddle tap valves.
    I think itís just a traditional wood door jamb? I cut out the bottom to fit the hardwood underneath hoping for a clean fit, and only marginally succeeding. Iíd like to fit the reducer under the jamb, but donít know how to do that without continuing that cut all the way across. I can take some more pics if thatíll help clarify what Iím unable to properly describe.

    Yeah, I have concerns about leaks, and my kids empty the ice trays, so Iím in favor of not changing things, but the wife is insistent. Good to know about plastic BS. No saddle tap valves, but the kit does include a plastic line. Iíll figure out a way to fit a braided line onto the existing fittings. Thanks!!
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  9. #5784
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    Dec 2016
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    Man... I'd try harder to talk the wife out of it. Water in a fridge was one of the worst ideas humans ever came up with.

  10. #5785
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    Quote Originally Posted by skaredshtles View Post
    Man... I'd try harder to talk the wife out of it. Water in a fridge was one of the worst ideas humans ever came up with.
    LOL. I knew Iíd hear from you. Iíll give it one more shot.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  11. #5786
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    Quote Originally Posted by spanky View Post
    On the topic of table saws, would you rather a modern/new jobsite saw or an older belt driven shop saw? Like this one: https://cnj.craigslist.org/tls/d/cla...405584413.html
    Delta Model 10 was the contractors saw of its day--back when men were men. Mine just died--I think I posted in a different thread. Parts not available. It depends on what you plan to use it for, your budget and whether you need it to be portable. Tell us more.
    I'd skip the craigslist saw, just because of age and no guard : -- ) but the price is right, if it runs smoothly. If it vibrates a lot I'd skip.

  12. #5787
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    re: Table Saws Need to thin the quiver

    After always wanting one, I've acquired 3 free saws in the past 60 days. They all run smooth and are square. I have owners manuals for each one.

    On top a 8" Crafsman - Has all the parts.

    10" Tradesman - Missing the Miter gauge, anti kick back paws, riving knife and fence.

    10" Craftsman - Has a fence but missing all of the above and the clearance plate ($20 on eBay now).

    I plan on making some picture frames, small boxes and a picnic table . Rip a 2x4x8 maybe.

    What should I keep? Which one is best to learn on and keep all my parts?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A few people feel the rain. Most people just get wet.

  13. #5788
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    Nov 2005
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    Is the 10" Craftsman belt drive or direct? I would be inclined to keep that one, regardless of your answer, but if it's belt drive, all the better. Realistically, the most important thing is whether you can get the blade parallel with the fence. Even better if you can get the blade parallel with the miter slots so you can make good sleds so you don't cut your fucking fingers off* making picture frames.

    The best use of the miter gauges that come with tablesaws is to throw them in the fucking garbage, immediately.

    GOAT for making table saw sleds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbG-n--LFgQ.

    Check out his other videos on setting up and using tablesaws, too.

    Also, buy a good blade. It is money well spent.

    * Nobody except pros** should use any tablesaw that is not a SawStop. If you disagree, fuck off. I don't have one, either. But I used to be a pro and do all sorts of shit with a table saw on a daily basis and now that I am desk jockey the thing scares the piss out of me.

    ** And if you're a pro, why don't you have a SawStop?

  14. #5789
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    Good info. I hear ya. I'm not a pro and I know it.

    Think I'll keep the two Craftsmans as it will be easier to find the missing parts for the 10". It's direct drive BTW.
    A few people feel the rain. Most people just get wet.

  15. #5790
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    New contractor saws aren’t that expensive, and can be nicer with features than older* beat to shit sheet metal rusty things from some garage. But I’m a dork with a saw that uses feather boards & riving knife and all that shit so I don’t fuck stuff up, and get the job done quickly. Hence my earlier answer of “hand plane”.

  16. #5791
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    Jan 2008
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    Root--I hear you re Saw Stop. My main objection is having to change the brake to use a dado set. And watching people using one in our community shop I see people not using the guard because they think they can't get hurt--like taking more chances because you have an avy air bag.
    I use the miter gauge all the time for cutting the shoulders on tenons and for other joint making cuts. I use the sled for panels.

    Agree it's important that the blade is parallel to the slots--I would carefully check all 3 saws and keep the one that is parallel. The rip fence is usually adjustable to parallel (some people set the tail end 1/64 outside of parallel) but squaring the blade to the miter saws is tough, especially on a saw with table mounted trunnions like these. I assume parts are not available. The insert ("clearance plate) is easy to make with a piece of plywood and some little screws to adjust it flush to the table. A riving knife can be made. Depending on the width of the miter slots there is probably an (expensive) aftermarket miter gauge that will fit. The little craftsman should be fine for little boxes and frames. Not so good for ripping 2x4, especially since it may be hard to find good 8in blades.

  17. #5792
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    Apr 2021
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    Quote Originally Posted by bagtagley View Post
    TMy uncle Henry was missing two fingers from a table saw incident. That made an impression at a young age.
    Might have told this story here already....My granddad was showing a new employee at his shop how he should never use a table saw. Grandad lost three finger tips and I'd guess the employee understood very clearly his point after that.

    At a young age it was really weird for me to see three short fingers with no nails.

  18. #5793
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    Oct 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by spanky View Post
    On the topic of table saws, would you rather a modern/new jobsite saw or an older belt driven shop saw? Like this one: https://cnj.craigslist.org/tls/d/cla...405584413.html
    I would take that table saw over my 10 inch portable Makita. I leave the Makita inbthe garage and it only goes as far as the driveway. A table saw like that one with a much bigger table, better fence and more power is preferable if you are not moving it beyond where the wheels take it.

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  19. #5794
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    My FIL was a Cabinet Maker. German Guild member and he had made his own hand tools. I have some of his planes. He was the foreman in a millwork shop when I met him. He never used power tool except a drill at home. Made some nice desks, bookcases tables and such. "I've carried too many fingers" was the reason he gave.

    Thanks for the DIY clearance plate idea. And I'll be checking how things square up.
    A few people feel the rain. Most people just get wet.

  20. #5795
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    Oct 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootSkier View Post
    Is the 10" Craftsman belt drive or direct? I would be inclined to keep that one, regardless of your answer, but if it's belt drive, all the better. Realistically, the most important thing is whether you can get the blade parallel with the fence. Even better if you can get the blade parallel with the miter slots so you can make good sleds so you don't cut your fucking fingers off* making picture frames.

    The best use of the miter gauges that come with tablesaws is to throw them in the fucking garbage, immediately.

    GOAT for making table saw sleds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbG-n--LFgQ.

    Check out his other videos on setting up and using tablesaws, too.

    Also, buy a good blade. It is money well spent.

    * Nobody except pros** should use any tablesaw that is not a SawStop. If you disagree, fuck off. I don't have one, either. But I used to be a pro and do all sorts of shit with a table saw on a daily basis and now that I am desk jockey the thing scares the piss out of me.

    ** And if you're a pro, why don't you have a SawStop?
    I'm not any kind of woodworker but went down the rabbit hole watching that video and a couple others. Wow, that guy is good. And I have apparently been doing it all wrong. I feel lucky to have all ten fingers.

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  21. #5796
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    Quote Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post
    My FIL was a Cabinet Maker. German Guild member and he had made his own hand tools. I have some of his planes. He was the foreman in a millwork shop when I met him. He never used power tool except a drill at home. Made some nice desks, bookcases tables and such. "I've carried too many fingers" was the reason he gave.

    Thanks for the DIY clearance plate idea. And I'll be checking how things square up.
    Not easy to be a cabinet maker in Germany--formal training, apprenticeship, and certification of some kind required.
    And to make furniture like you describe with no power tools--he must have been extraordinarily fit. I used to joint and thickness plane rough hardwood with hand planes but it was a lot of work, a lot of blisters, and no way could you make a living doing it that way. I wised up and got a combo jointer planer as soon as I could afford.
    I read that in germany kitchen cabinets disassemble like IKEA and people take them with them when they move. Apropos of nothing.

  22. #5797
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    Nov 2002
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    * Nobody except pros** should use any tablesaw that is not a SawStop. If you disagree, fuck off. I don't have one, either. But I used to be a pro and do all sorts of shit with a table saw on a daily basis and now that I am desk jockey the thing scares the piss out of me.

    ** And if you're a pro, why don't you have a SawStop?
    Maybe when the 2 Dewalt's I have die but the answer your question...because I don't but my fingers anywhere near the blade, I understand how the machine works, it's is property adjusted, I know what the redflag cuts look like, I always read the board before I cut etc...

    A TGR jobsite would be a site to behold. No tall ladders, Sawstops only, guards on everything, so much PPE that everyone looks ready for battle, fine German hand tools everywhere, no pickup trucks...just Euro min vans.

    Nothing would get done. I take safety pretty seriously but the best tool you have for that is your brain.

  23. #5798
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    All the talk lately about sewer drains and roots had me wondering when I was going to have to deal with it. Been in the house over 20 years and the house is 80 years old with a smoke bush right over the sewer line. End of the week there was a crew setup on the street and a flyer on our door. Looks like the city is going to clean and line the sewers including the lines from the house to the street. I guess our taxes are paying off. Click image for larger version. 

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  24. #5799
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    Oct 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flounder View Post
    All the talk lately about sewer drains and roots had me wondering when I was going to have to deal with it. Been in the house over 20 years and the house is 80 years old with a smoke bush right over the sewer line. End of the week there was a crew setup on the street and a flyer on our door. Looks like the city is going to clean and line the sewers including the lines from the house to the street. I guess our taxes are paying off. Click image for larger version. 

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    Must be the time of year. I just got a notice for the same maintenance taking place tomorrow.

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  25. #5800
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy_Goggles View Post
    Maybe when the 2 Dewalt's I have die but the answer your question...because I don't but my fingers anywhere near the blade, I understand how the machine works, it's is property adjusted, I know what the redflag cuts look like, I always read the board before I cut etc...

    A TGR jobsite would be a site to behold. No tall ladders, Sawstops only, guards on everything, so much PPE that everyone looks ready for battle, fine German hand tools everywhere, no pickup trucks...just Euro min vans.

    Nothing would get done. I take safety pretty seriously but the best tool you have for that is your brain.
    Somehow I doubt those safety features would survive until lunch.



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