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  1. #7851
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    Jan 2008
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    livin the dream
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    5,434

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    How often do you have to clear the filters in the faucets in your house?


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    Last edited by nickwm21; 03-20-2023 at 04:06 PM.
    Best Skier on the Mountain
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    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  2. #7852
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    SnoqWA
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    Drip emitters have tiny tiny holes. Going to clog much quicker than your faucet.

  3. #7853
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Dystopia
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    19,254
    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    Those systems work well with synthetic decking, but natural materials will maintain a level of humidity because the airflow is restricted on the bottom side. This will eventually cause differential movement leading to cracking & deterioration in the finish boards, especially if exposed to the sky. Even jungle hardwoods like ipe need air movement to keep from warping/cracking. It also stores humidity near your framing so it will always be more damp than the surrounding air.
    Yeah. You wouldn’t want normal wood on top.
    But ipe is stupidly rot resistant.
    Not sure about “storing humidity” next to framing. That’s weird. The framing is below the deck and water trexescape.
    So. What’s your solution for under deck dryness? I had a shit system of pine strapping and vinyl siding soffit. Until it came crashing down after it rotted.
    Ymmv

  4. #7854
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Granite, UT
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    1,714
    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    I installed a drip irrigation system in my yard this weekend. Longest run from hosebib connection is about 180', the second half is in the shady part of the yard so lower water pressure is less of an issue. I used 1/2" tubing, with 1/4" hose connection to drip emmiters. Probably 55 total connections. And then i buried it under about 3" of dirt. I have end caps on the line for flushing, but how quickly will these lines silt up and required flushing and or replacement, or am i good for a good 10+ years probably?

    I have a second 1/2 line on a separate connection to my veggie garden area (raised planters and in-ground beds) with 2 loops stubbed at the tees ready to go once i figure out what/where im going to plant and thus the routing of my 1/2" emiiter hoses. Any suggestions here?
    FWIW, I run a significantly smaller system in my garden in the summer. I'll fill the filter housing full of fertilizer a few times a season and haven't had a clog.

  5. #7855
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
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    22
    don't ever think you can handle to be your own interior designer by just using 3d apps. it doesn't work this way((
    I made a project for my little apartment and failed

  6. #7856
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,003
    Quote Originally Posted by bfree View Post
    Drip emitters have tiny tiny holes. Going to clog much quicker than your faucet.
    I guess youd have to put the filter on upstream of the PRV, huh? I mean, there is already a mesh screen in my assembly are you talking about an even finer screen that the size youd typically have in your faucet?

    I would think my emitters would clog way quicker from dirt and dust splashback than from particulate in the domestic water supply? that does bring up a good point that i should throw some screens on the connections for my emmitter hose because dirt should get in there pretty easily and i done want that contaminating the rest of the system.

  7. #7857
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Tahoe-ish
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    2,715
    Just embrace the inevitability of replacing emitters and redoing 30% of the system every year, like the rest of us who have drip irrigation systems. Between dirt, calcium, etc clogging shit and freezing, along with reconfiguration for new plants, I spend more time than I'd prefer with that shit.

    But garden veggies sure are yummy!
    ride bikes, climb, ski, travel, cook, work to fund former, repeat.

  8. #7858
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    3,003
    Quote Originally Posted by climberevan View Post
    Just embrace the inevitability of replacing emitters and redoing 30% of the system every year, like the rest of us who have drip irrigation systems. Between dirt, calcium, etc clogging shit and freezing, along with reconfiguration for new plants, I spend more time than I'd prefer with that shit.

    But garden veggies sure are yummy!


    I have drip emitters set up on my landscape planting as that is semi-permanent. For my veggie raised and inground planters i will have emitter hose just snaking through around wooden stakes so that it can be easily switched up mid season, or after every season without much work. The whole point of this exercise was to simplify my life and add time back to my day. We will see if that pans out....

  9. #7859
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    SnoqWA
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    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    I guess youd have to put the filter on upstream of the PRV, huh? I mean, there is already a mesh screen in my assembly are you talking about an even finer screen that the size youd typically have in your faucet?

    I would think my emitters would clog way quicker from dirt and dust splashback than from particulate in the domestic water supply? that does bring up a good point that i should throw some screens on the connections for my emmitter hose because dirt should get in there pretty easily and i done want that contaminating the rest of the system.
    Yes upstream of PR.
    https://help.dripdepot.com/support/s...y-installation


    Here's a photo of the filter I linked next to a hose screen. Much much finer holes. .003 inch diameter.Click image for larger version. 

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  10. #7860
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    2,273
    Quote Originally Posted by climberevan View Post
    Just embrace the inevitability of replacing emitters and redoing 30% of the system every year, like the rest of us who have drip irrigation systems.
    Nice to know that everyone has that problem. Judging by the water bills, I think there may be a leak in mine. Just a small system, but there's still maybe 150 feet of supply line and dozens of emitters. Really not looking forward to trying to hunt down the leak.

  11. #7861
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
    Posts
    10,071
    What is this seal called? Canít find it on Anderson docs. Itís the interior seal for a sliding glass door. The door closes against those two seals. Itís sorta ďLĒ shaped and is stuck on there with adhesive. Or, was.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  12. #7862
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    Jan 2019
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  13. #7863
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    Jan 2008
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    truckee
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    21,920
    Quote Originally Posted by climberevan View Post
    Just embrace the inevitability of replacing emitters and redoing 30% of the system every year, like the rest of us who have drip irrigation systems. Between dirt, calcium, etc clogging shit and freezing, along with reconfiguration for new plants, I spend more time than I'd prefer with that shit.

    But garden veggies sure are yummy!
    Quote Originally Posted by dan_pdx View Post
    Nice to know that everyone has that problem. Judging by the water bills, I think there may be a leak in mine. Just a small system, but there's still maybe 150 feet of supply line and dozens of emitters. Really not looking forward to trying to hunt down the leak.
    Me too. Good to know I'm not alone. Looking forward to not having to work on the system this year. By the time the snow melts and the soil dries out we should be into the fall freeze.

  14. #7864
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Central OR
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    5,934
    My dog brings me random lengths of drip line now and then. No idea where heís digging them up from in his pursuit of gophers. I guess Iíll just have to chase the geysers this spring.

  15. #7865
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Shadynasty's Jazz Club
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    10,071
    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    Yep, itís the jamb weatherstrip. Finally found a video breaking down all the parts. Ordered that and replacement interlocking seals that I had planned to ignore.
    Remind me. We'll send him a red cap and a Speedo.

  16. #7866
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,273
    My 1913 attic is currently insulated with not nearly enough fiberglass batt. I'm planning to cover it with blown-in insulation up to R-49 and trying to figure out if I want fiberglass or cellulose. Any compelling reasons to go with one rather than the other?

  17. #7867
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Sandy
    Posts
    12,945
    Advice sought.
    Developer quality pipe going to outside water faucet did not survive this crazy winter. Blew inside the corner wall in my daughters room. Turned all water off immediately and spent 4 hours carpet cleaning up the water and with towels Saturday. Got fans on it all immediately and that part is going as well as expected.

    Called in a professional first thing this morning to fix the pipe. Beyond my expertise.
    Hey cut a small hole to access things to fix it. In doing so he confirmed my thoughts that the installation was soaked. So here we are. I cut out part of the wall and have pulled all the insulation out near the leak.

    Fans on the wall now till thinking Friday? Iím reading I should get some sort of anti microbial spray to keep mold from forming as well. Anyone use a product like this or have a recommendation? What else do I need to not forget before I re-insulate and patch this thing up/paint?

    I appreciate any words of wisdom you have, thanks.


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    "boobs just make the world better really" - Woodsy

  18. #7868
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Sandy
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    "boobs just make the world better really" - Woodsy

  19. #7869
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
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    19,254
    Shockwave or microban are the main anti microbials
    Ordinarily, I would say fans don’t work, but UT is so dry it should work. Commercial dehumidifiers are needed usually after a flood.

    For attic insulation, if you have soffit vents, (which you should) put those styrofoam forms in each rafter bay before blown in.
    It’s easier just to roll thick batts up there (crossways from the joists), but blown has no gaps. But you need the blower and the soffit things in each roof rafter bay. Bats don’t need it because they don’t cover the soffits.
    Either way, do yourself a favor and put some wood up there to raise the level in case you need to do any work. Even if it’s just a 2x6 runway down the middle. Once you bury the joists it’s hard as hell to walk up there.

  20. #7870
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    18,047
    Greetings, I own a rental and the tenant called me last week to report some drywall wetness. The property is two stories with garages downstairs and the living area up stairs. The leak detectors ruled out a plumbing leak and think it is water/rain getting onto the outdoor solarium and then finding a crack to drip into the lower garage. The concrete has 2 drains in it and both are draining well, so no wetness gets into the upstairs, but the garage ceiling drywall has a 2'X3' damaged area in the garage drywall.
    So what to do? Should I seal the cement with some of that waterproof/rubberized roll on material?
    Thanks for your thoughts and a contractor is coming out next week to look at it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

  21. #7871
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    19,218
    I wouldnít have guessed SD would be that mossy

    Tracing your pathway is going to define your fix ó find and confirm that first

  22. #7872
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
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    59715
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    By experience I would first look at the sill for the sliding door.

  23. #7873
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    North Vancouver
    Posts
    696
    I work in restoration leak detection at times. Sometimes it is quite easy and sometimes you are chasing a rabbit. Since you are not there, unfortunately you are going to have to "trust" the contractor. Hopefully they know wha they are doing and not going to screw you. The fist thing I always do in situations like this is look for where it is the greenest and work backwards. Its almost always at that spot where the failure is.
    Then we clean it, then we inspect again. First thing i would do is inspect, then clean it. Is that concrete ? Looks cracked which may post a problem.
    What if "Alternative" energy wasn't so alternative ?

  24. #7874
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    At the beach
    Posts
    18,047
    Yes, it is concrete with a couple of hairline cracks in it, hence why I thought the rubberized sealer may be a good call after pressure washing the entire area. The greenest area is on the right side of the slider. Maybe the leak starts there?

    Quote Originally Posted by ::: ::: View Post
    I wouldn’t have guessed SD would be that mossy

    Tracing your pathway is going to define your fix — find and confirm that first
    This winter was very wet for San Diego. Tracing it back would envolve ripping out the sub floor area under the concrete. Is that a good idea?
    Quote Originally Posted by leroy jenkins View Post
    I think you'd have an easier time understanding people if you remembered that 80% of them are fucking morons.
    That is why I like dogs, more than most people.

  25. #7875
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    Jan 2019
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    Door sill. Start there.

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