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  1. #9676
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,024
    Quote Originally Posted by climberevan View Post
    As a GC I agree that you should report them. Do the world a solid.
    Get them to dig out and replace the 3CY of dirt, take pictures while they do it, and then report their asses to the City/County, and the BBB. 100% this is SOP for them and it is entirely unacceptable from an environmental and ethical standpoint.

  2. #9677
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,825
    Quote Originally Posted by I Skied Bandini Mountain View Post
    How about if we agree that a 125 foot span is not practical and economic and needs to be rethunk.
    Slackline tension calculator seems relevant to this discussion: https://www.balancecommunity.com/pag...ion-calculator

    I don't know the weight or sag you're going to be working with, but it suggests to me that you're definitely going to need some guy wires

  3. #9678
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    slc
    Posts
    18,131
    Quote Originally Posted by californiagrown View Post
    Get them to dig out and replace the 3CY of dirt, take pictures while they do it, and then report their asses to the City/County, and the BBB. 100% this is SOP for them and it is entirely unacceptable from an environmental and ethical standpoint.
    This.

  4. #9679
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    shadow of HS butte
    Posts
    6,501

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    Thanks for the replies all, too many to quote directly but I'll try to clarify a couple things

    - In no way do I anticipate tensioning the lights enough them to level, there will be several feet of sag. My super scientific test run was stretching out about 75' of extension cord from the 2nd story patio to me, on a ladder, holding the cord overhead. It was heavy, but nothing that had me worried about snapping a 4x4. The 11' that I had measured at the post end is actually up on a stone wall about 2.5' above the backyard area that the lights will span. There is a flower bed atop the stone wall and then it turns into farm field beyond. See attached sketch. So even if the lights sag 4', they'll still be about 9.5' above the main gathering area. Highly doubt we'll have any spans of 125', that was a conservative estimate. I bet the longest will be somewhere between 95'-110'.

    - I've all but ruled out quikrete. I'm a CE and have worked with a shit ton of concrete over the years. I know for certain I'm going to treat mixing any concrete like a fucking science experiment, not to mention actually following the curing instructions, which I'm not really set up to do properly. But most importantly this is going to be up for maybe a week, so screw concrete.

    - The wildcard: this property is a double lot, and half of it has been leased back to an adjacent farmer for like 20 years. So hoping we can call in a favor to have him auger 5 post holes.

    - I'm leaning heavily toward setting 4x4s. 4' deep sounds about right, and thinking I can build some very simple braces and pin them with concrete stakes or rebar for added security.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #9680
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Your Mom's House
    Posts
    8,332
    OK, this is a temporary thing? Dig a hole, put a post in it, backfill with dirt or rock or jizz or whatever, call it a day, You'll be fine. Use 6x6s rather than 4x4s if you're really worried, or put a post mid-span.

    I bet your farmer homie has a PTO auger. Definitely call him up.

  6. #9681
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    inpdx
    Posts
    20,362

    Home Remodel: Do, Don'ts, Advice

    That spread will sway in a breeze of any kind…consider cross wires to stabilize the array in the span

  7. #9682
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    21,440
    Wtf. Temporary install for an event. And your a CE? Don’t ask us retards. A 4x4 with a deep hole is just fine. It’s just wires and lights. Only thing I would add is to string wire and zip tie the decorative lights to that wire. It’s a long distance to expect crappy lights to hang.

    Bracing? Cross winds? It’s a fucking string of lights for a temp setup.

    PS. What’s the shindig? Marriage? Keg stands and boofing?
    I’ve just decided to be a middle aged somewhat depressed somewhat anxious fucktard until the end.

  8. #9683
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Joisey
    Posts
    2,516
    Quote Originally Posted by Core Shot View Post
    PS. What’s the shindig? Marriage? Keg stands and boofing?
    Sounds like the making of a gender reveal gone awry.
    Because rich has nothing to do with money.

  9. #9684
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    shadow of HS butte
    Posts
    6,501
    ^Got a couple years before that, hopefully


    I’ll be sure to update with some pics when it’s all set up


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums

  10. #9685
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    base of the Bush
    Posts
    15,005
    Keep it simple


    Click image for larger version. 

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    www.apriliaforum.com

    "If the road You followed brought you to this,of what use was the road"?

    "I have no idea what I am talking about but would be happy to share my biased opinions as fact on the matter. "
    Ottime

  11. #9686
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,024
    Quote Originally Posted by east or bust View Post
    Thanks for the replies all, too many to quote directly but I'll try to clarify a couple things

    - In no way do I anticipate tensioning the lights enough them to level, there will be several feet of sag. My super scientific test run was stretching out about 75' of extension cord from the 2nd story patio to me, on a ladder, holding the cord overhead. It was heavy, but nothing that had me worried about snapping a 4x4. The 11' that I had measured at the post end is actually up on a stone wall about 2.5' above the backyard area that the lights will span. There is a flower bed atop the stone wall and then it turns into farm field beyond. See attached sketch. So even if the lights sag 4', they'll still be about 9.5' above the main gathering area. Highly doubt we'll have any spans of 125', that was a conservative estimate. I bet the longest will be somewhere between 95'-110'.

    - I've all but ruled out quikrete. I'm a CE and have worked with a shit ton of concrete over the years. I know for certain I'm going to treat mixing any concrete like a fucking science experiment, not to mention actually following the curing instructions, which I'm not really set up to do properly. But most importantly this is going to be up for maybe a week, so screw concrete.

    - The wildcard: this property is a double lot, and half of it has been leased back to an adjacent farmer for like 20 years. So hoping we can call in a favor to have him auger 5 post holes.

    - I'm leaning heavily toward setting 4x4s. 4' deep sounds about right, and thinking I can build some very simple braces and pin them with concrete stakes or rebar for added security.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    As a fellow CE... youre overthinking this. Think more shady dirtwork contractor and less like youre gonna need to stamp it.

    4x4s will be fine. If youre super worried, install some guy wires in the directions you think it needs support. You know what those guy wires should be?... wire attached to 2' lengths of scrap wood buried horizontally in the ground (I.e. snow T-anchor). Jerry rig this shit, it doesnt need to last, and it will need to be ripped out and disposed of in a week, so keep in mind the ease of demo, too.

  12. #9687
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    23,409
    How do real cantinas do it?

  13. #9688
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,447
    With tequila

  14. #9689
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    499
    seeking some plumbing advice without asking too open-ended of a question. I'm planning to replace all the supply lines in my house and I know enough to make it work, but I want to know enough to pass an inspection. I read the supply section of the code and nothing jumped out at me, but code prose doesn't really lend itself to jumping-out. I guess my question is: what are some gotchas that cause DIY guys to fail inspections?

    I replaced all the wiring in this house and passed those inspections, so there's precedent for me figuring out this kind of thing. Electrical equivalents of what I'm curious about are like AFCI rules and having a neutral at all switches.

    This is a 1ba house with all the fixtures on two walls and above an unfinished basement, so it's minimally invasive. Doing copper instead of pex because it's exposed to daylight and I inherited a bunch of material from my grandpa's basement

  15. #9690
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    5,894
    If you passed an electrical inspection you should be detail oriented enough to pass a plumbing inspection.

    Read your local plumbing code.

    Pay attention to how you are supposed to support the pipe and protect the pipe.

    Call the inspection hotline if your local has one. Ask what they want to see and when. Different jurisdictions want to see different things (pressure tests, insulation on vs off, etc…)


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  16. #9691
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    23,409
    IME as a DIYer who doesn't know what he doesn't know, you only have to be to code in places a fat, old, lazy inspector can get to easily. At least in Sacramento. In Truckee the inspectors are more agile.

  17. #9692
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Southeast New York
    Posts
    11,909
    Quote Originally Posted by old goat View Post
    IME as a DIYer who doesn't know what he doesn't know, you only have to be to code in places a fat, old, lazy inspector can get to easily. At least in Sacramento. In Truckee the inspectors are more agile.
    The wisdom that comes from experience (and being old) I figure I can usually lean on 'I don't know what I don't know' but it has bitten me in the ass a few times and when it comes time to sell this place it probably will a few more times.

  18. #9693
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    truckee
    Posts
    23,409
    If we ever sell I plan a very thorough disclosure--leave nothing for the buyer's inspector to find to knock the price down after we accept their offer. Asbestos, lead, knob and tube, not to code wiring in the garage . . .

  19. #9694
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,498
    I built a cedar deck like, balcony cover. I get a lot of rain. Should I stain it, seal, it or leave as is and pressure wash every year?

    Home depot has:

    Oil waterproofing wood finish
    Waterproofing wood stain
    Stain + sealant

    What's the difference?

  20. #9695
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    livin the dream
    Posts
    5,894
    Go oil based.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Best Skier on the Mountain
    Self-Certified
    1992 - 2012
    Squaw Valley, USA

  21. #9696
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    2,498
    These are my options

    To bad there's no Schaeffer's dieck sealant.


  22. #9697
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Dystopia
    Posts
    21,440
    Quote Originally Posted by nickwm21 View Post
    Go oil based.


    Sent from my iPhone using TGR Forums
    Exactly.
    If you can buy it in your state

    Oil will last longer
    I’ve just decided to be a middle aged somewhat depressed somewhat anxious fucktard until the end.

  23. #9698
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,085
    All that pictured is garbage.
    Messmers uv plus is voc compliant here in SLC.
    Do yourself a longterm favor(because you'll be doing this again,and again, and again...) and use a decent product

  24. #9699
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Down on Electric Avenue
    Posts
    4,539
    ^^^^^^^^^^^

    Chuckling at the garbage...even the jank is pricy.


    I like Messmers.

  25. #9700
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Shuswap Highlands
    Posts
    4,378
    I’ve had good luck with a first coat of double boiled linseed oil, followed by Sikkens SRD. Pressure wash and recoat with Sikkens every couple years. Pricey, but it’s the only thing that stands up to our hot summers and cold & snowy winters.
    I’ve mostly given up on the deck itself and just pressure wash it every year, replace planks as needed. Redoing the preservative treatment on the cedar and fir railing this year though. This is the back stairs railing so far: Click image for larger version. 

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    Still going to put a coat of Cetol23 on the top plank.

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